The Complete Mystery of Madeleine McCann™
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Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann' Mm11

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The Complete Mystery of Madeleine McCann™
Welcome to 'The Complete Mystery of Madeleine McCann' forum 🌹

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Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann' Mm11

Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann' Regist10

Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann'

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Post by Jill Havern 16.04.19 11:12

NETFLIX TRANSCRIPT EPISODE 1:



PART ONE:
Reporter 1: Police in Portugal are searching for a three-year old British girl who is thought to have been abducted from her bed. Madeleine McCann was on holiday with her family in a resort on the Algarve. Her parents were having dinner a short distance away and they discovered she was missing when they checked on the room.
Jill Renwick speaking over the phone: The shutters had been broken open and they've gone into the room and taken Madeleine. 
Reporter 2: Sixty staff and guests carried out a frantic search until four O'Clock this morning.
Ernie Allen: As time passes, the likelihood of safe recovery grows less. 
Reporter 3: Now is the time to be looking. It's only really just happened. They don't want the trail to go cold. 
Reporter 4: The couple and their families are completely distraught.
Man: It's unexplainable.
Woman: Children just don't disappear from their beds in the middle of the night.
Ernie Allen: I don't remember any child abduction case globally larger, more high profile, more impactful than Madeleine McCann.
Man: If you made a dozen movies out of this... Nobody would believe them.
Justine McGuinness: It's the worst thing that you can possibly imagine happening to somebody, that their child disappears.
Robbyn Swann: They have tried for years to have a child, eventually resorting to IVF, and giving birth to their first little girl, Madeleine. We first got involved in this story because we were watching the news one night. Kate McCann was asked, how long would she look for Madeleine? And she said that she would look for forever and our little girl who's own middle name happens to be Madeleine, turned to me and said ''Mommy, would you look for me for forever?'' And of course I said the thing that every parent would say. ''Yes, of course I'd look for you for forever''


EPISODE 1: The beneath truth.
Robbyn Swann: But then I went away and I thought about it as a journalist and I thought about, ''What did it mean?'' What had the McCann's done? What was the story? 
Anthony Summers: The case appeared to be a great jumble of allegations and counter-allegations. You need to build a very careful chronology, devote all your time, go on a mining expedition into the story 12 hours a day, to be able to lay out, in the end, what every story is, to answer the question, ''What happened?''
Reporter 1: We've got more on that breaking news this hour. A three-year old British girl has gone missing in Portugal. 
Reporter 2: They believe she is still alive. And that they have a suspect in mind. 
Reporter 3: Police and sniffer dogs on the streets....
Reporter 4: .....Disappeared from her bed when they were having dinner....
Reporter 5:....Said a Portuguese man who was involved in the early searches....
Muddled reporters voices....
Sandra Fegueiras: A Russian man....
Reporter....200 Yards from where Madeleine McCann....
Reporter....We all want to be here for the salvation of Madeleine's....
Reporter......100 days since Madeleine McCann disappeared....
Radio chatter...Certain things about his behaviour...
Reporter...Police and sniffer dogs...
Reporter....Suspected traces of blood in the McCann's holiday apartment....
Gerry McCann, 4th May Madeleine appeal clip: Please, If you have Madeleine, let her come home. 
The disappearance of Madeleine McCann...
Leicester - United Kingdom
Gerry McCann in the hospital to a patient. ''How're you feeling? How did you find the scan?''
Robbyn Swann: Gerry had a good job in Leicester. Kate was working part-time as a GP. While mostly staying home with by then, three young children. 
Anthony Summer: She felt a bit uneasy. She felt sort of a bit odd about the coming vacation. In the end, it was the vacation that should never have happened. 
Cuts to the airport bus video.
Payne: Hang on, I think we're on video. Get everyone in. Oopsie you alright (As Madeleine falls on the escalator) 
Kate McCann: We went on the 28th of April and there was nine adult and the kids. It seemed like the ideal balance, really. Having a family holiday, the kids having fun and not getting bored, and for us to have a little bit of time too. Madeleine in particular was having a ball. 
Robbyn Swann: The ocean club was one of several complexes in the village of Praia da Luz. It was made up of purpose-built apartments and small villas, mostly self-catering. It had four pools, it had numerous tennis courts. It had a kiddie club where toddlers and smaller children could be cared for during the day. Mark Warner were the company that ran the Ocean club in Praia da Luz. 
Jayne Jensen: To say it's a middle class holiday would be fair. The children make friends in the kids club. And then the parents make friends or the parents meet because the dad sails and the other dad sails and then they arrange to meet for a drink. And then the wives meet or they meet on the tennis court.  So it's a very social holiday in that respect. My sister and I have been on a lot of Mark Warner holiday's together, mainly because we play tennis and being two ladies of a certain age, you people watch. And we had spotted them as a group because they were having fun. 
Neil Berry: We arrived literally the same Saturday that the McCann's and their party arrived at Praia da Luz. It was a typical family holiday, really. It's a mediteranian resort, the sun was shining for late April. We were happy with that. 
Jayne Jensen: We knew Gerry from our tennis group. He was well dressed, great sense of humour. You don't actually stand talking an awful lot, because obviously you're worried far more about your backhand or your lob [Chuckles]
Neil Berry: This is Jessica, my eldest, who was four and a half here, and she benefited most from the holiday by being part of the kids club. [Neil Points to a picture of a woman and 5 children] So, this is Jessie here playing ringleader [Neil points to the tallest girl on the left side of the pictre] And, uh, this is Madeleine here. They were of the similar age, months in it, and they became as thick as thieves. I remember they'd been out sailing, which I thought was quite brave of the kids club, but they took them out on the sea. And, um, they were together in the boat. Jess's only real recollection of the holiday was where Jess lost her straw summer hat in the sea and Madeleine launching herself in to recover it for her, much to the alarm of the kids club staff who swiftly grabbed her and dragged her back into the boat. 
Robbyn Swann: One of the reasons they had chosen the Ocean club was that it was a family-friendly resort. It operated a night creche. All of the McCann group decided this really didn't suit them. Kate and Gerry thought they'd have to put them down too early and pick them up too late and they'd just disrupt the children. 
Anthony Summer: The Tapas restaurant was across the other side of the swimming pool below the McCann's apartment. Apartment 5a. 60 yards away as the crow flies, about a hundred yards if you walked down the street, under an archway and then along besides the pool to the tapas, which was a canopied pleasant place to sit. 
Robbyn Swann: It would seem the most convenient place to have dinner while leaving their children to sleep in their own rooms. 
Gerry McCann: It seemed a fairly natural thing to do. It was so close. You can actually see the apartment. It didn't feel that different to dining out in the back garden. 
Robbyn Swann: The McCann's and their friends decided amongst themselves that they would operate what they thought of as a baby listening service. Every 20 minutes or half an hour, they would get up and check on their own children, and that's what they did and did successfully through much of their holiday. 
3rd May 2007
Neil Berry: In the afternoon on the Thursday, nearly a week into their holiday, the kids were particularly tired. Sea air and being out on the boats all day. Our intention was to put the kids to bed and then get a takeaway from the tapas restaurant to dine on our balcony. 
Robbyn Swan: About half-past Five, Kate went to meet the children where they were coming back from their respective kiddie clubs. And Madeleine was very very tired that night, she noticed it and asked to be carried home. Kate said she started to read a storybook about animals that has a little song in it about if you're happy and you know it shout your name. And the children barely made it through and Madeleine was almost asleep before the book was even finished. Kate then went and got ready for the evening and had a first glass of wine while Gerry was getting ready. He had come in while the children were having their final story and said his goodnights. By half past eight they were walking down to the tapas restaurant and getting settled there. They were among the first to arrive that night. Matt Oldfield reported to the McCann's when he arrived at 9 O'Clock that everything was quiet as he passed the McCann's apartment on the outside. About 9:05, Gerry got up to make the first check on his own children. He went into the apartment, through the back patio door, which was unlocked, and went to the bedroom door. and had what he described as ''One of those proud father moments,'' looking at his sleeping children and thinking how lucky he was. 
Anthony Summer: Around 9:25 Kate was about to leave to check herself, when Matt Oldfield offered to check for her. 
Robbyn Swan: He went into the apartment, again through the patio door, but didn't go into the room. He said he saw some light. He heard a sound as if it was one of the twins rolling over, but there was no other sound, and he went away satisfied. At ten O'Clock, according to the timeline given of the evening by Kate McCann, it was her turn to go to the apartment and have a check on the children. She went to the apartment, again going in through the patio door, and was surprised looking toward the bedroom to see more light than she expected to see, and the door opened more widely than she recalled it being open. She got to the door and then a wind slammed the door shut. She opened the door again...And this time realised that Madeleine's bed was empty. And the window was open, the shutters raised. 
Kate McCann voice: I then just went flying out down to the tapas restaurant, shouting, ''Someone's taken Madeleine!" And that's when the nightmare started. 
Jayne Jensen: Our tennis coach, was running past us, and, um, I just said ''You're going the wrong way,'' And he said ''No, I'll be back in a minute. One of the kids has gone missing.'' I left my sister in the bar and I went back up to find out what was going on. And as I turned round the corner and went up, there was a lot more commotion now. 
Neil Berry: Someone called up to us, calmly called up to us, ''Excuse me,'' You know, ''Can you see from up there?'' Or, ''Have you seen a blonde--young blonde child?'' And it was at that point where the alarm was raised. 
Jayne Jensen: We bumped into this chap Jez, who was on our tennis team, and he said ''Isn't it terrible about Gerry's little girl?'' And we said ''Oh my God, I didn't know it was Gerry.'' And that's when I heard that terrible noise. It was Kate howling. I could hear Kate howling. And it was an animal sound. I've only heard it twice in my life. One was when my mother died and one was when my nephew died. It's horrible. And it's--It's soul-destroying. Your childs gone. You know, how can anybody feel when their child's not lying in their bed? 
Kate McCann Voice: Not Madeleine, Not Madeleine, Not Madeleine,'' [Kate sighs] And Gerry was the same, you know. It's kind of--I'm not used to seeing Gerry obviously that upset. I can remember our friends shouting ''We need to close the borders,'' and they were shouting. ''Morocco, Algiers! Roadblocks! We need roadblocks!'' I just felt so helpless.
Jayne Jensen: By now, word's out in Luz. Basically, everybody was being called in. I mean, all the staff were there and obviously a lot of the guests. [Dogs barking sounds] 
Anthony Summers: They went back to the apartment and waited and got more and more agitated about it and still people were runnng around in the shadows in the apartment. And the police didn't come. Gerry went with a companion to the reception of the ocean club and urged them to call again. A message diverted a couple of policemen in a patrol car and they headed rapidly for the Ocean Club.
Robbyn Swan: There are two different brances of the police that are involved in the McCann investigation. One is the GNR. They are sort of the equivalent of a small town police patrol unit. They're the first on the scene. 
Neil Berry: We wandered over to the Ocean club. You just can't carry on with your evening eating and drinking and laughing if a child's gone missing. 
Jayne Jensen: So, whoever was available just went on the search. 
Neil Berry: I remember the police just saying that she's probably wandered off and fallen asleep under a bush....
GNR Officer speaking in Portuguese: Allegations are emerging through the 
Neil Berry continued: Which, to me, sounded ridiculous.
David Jones: I was on my boat in the Marina with my friends and I had to come back and there were no lights on. It should be open till two O'Clock and there was sort of nobody here, except I think the manager was clearing up. And, I said, ''What's going on?'' And he explained that there's a child missing and everyone had gone to look for the child. 
Jayne Jensen: All along the beach, the children's play area...There was a circle of area near the adult pool that I thought--I've always said it looked like a fairy circle so I was thinking for a childs mind. We looked all around there. Instantly, we were all the same people. We were all a whole group of people with one purpose, one aim. 
Neil Berry: Myself and the guys, we'd suggested that a group of us bundle into a car and head North and suggested that we would spread out...as long a distance as possible and head South through the resort towards the sea. 
Robbyn Swan: At about Midnight, the local head of the GNR unit decided he needed to alert someone in the PJ, who are the major crimes investigative unit. 
Goncalo Amaral speaking in Portuguese: When the case landed, I was the coordinator of the investigations. I was at the peak of my career after 30 years in the judicial police. The judicial police is the highest criminal investigative body. In Portugal, like the FBI of Portugal. 
Robbyn Swan: Goncalo Amaral was out having a very late dinner and sent an inspector and investigator out to apartment 5a. 
Goncalo Amaral: We came as soon as it was communicated to us, well, not right away. We arrived after the National Republican Guard, the GNR, who also got there late. The GNR were notified late. This lateness triggered a delay to the sequence of events. 
Robbyn Swan: When the investigator and inspector arrived, they were pretty horrified by what they found in terms of the lack of preservation of the scene. 
Goncalo Amaral: What we found was an empty place. It was very messy with clothes, which was normal, as they were on holiday, but it was messy. 
Robbyn Swan: Many, Many people had been in and out of Madeleine's bedroom and in and out of apartment 5a, doors and cupboards opened and closed. Evidence had been trampled. 
Goncalo Amaral: We inspected the place as if it had been a robbery. It is what you might call  the most ''minimal'' inspection in terms of detail. 
Neil Berry: We eventually ended back at the Ocean club, where there was quite a big gathering. It suddenly felt very, very serious, and very, very, sinister. Kate McCann was certainly insistent that Madeleine had not wandered off. She was quite insistent that she'd been taken. 
Anthony Summers: After Madeleine vanished, it dawned on a member McCann party, Jane Tanner, that she might well have seen something extremely important. At about 9:15, on her way back to look at her own children, she had seen a man crossing the road at the corner by the McCann's apartment. 
Clip of Jane Tanner on ''Madeleine was here'' reconstruction. Jane Tanner: I was walking up here to do the check and probably as I got to...It's hard to know exactly where, but probably about here, I saw the man walk across the road there carrying the child. 
Anthony Summers: The child appeared to be wearing light coloured pyjama's and to have bare feet, and it dawned on her  after it was known that Madeleine had disappeared, that just maybe she had seen the abduction of Madeleine actually taking place. 
Back to the Jane Tanner clip [Jane Tanner sobbing] [Sighs] 
Footage towards the Smith's sighting on the same street. 
Robbyn Swan: At around 10p.m. that evening, an Irish man named Martin Smith and his family, who had been in Praia da luz on the night of Madeleine's appearance, had seen a man carrying a little girl wearing pyjamas. 
Richard Bilton footage on the same road: Richard Bilton speaking: They saw a man carrying a child on his shoulder. Now, this was just before 10 O'Clock, about the same time that Madeleine McCann was discovered missing at the Ocean Club. 
Goncalo Amaral: They crossed paths with a man who was carrying a child, as if the child was sleeping, blonde, around Madeleine's age, and the man was walking briskly. She described the way he was dressed. 
Anthony Summers: That last morning, May the 3rd, Madeleine said, ''Mummy, why didn't you come last night when Sean and I were crying?'' 
Robbyn Swan: What had Madeleine meant and what had made her and Sean cry?
Anthony Summers: If an abductor came, had he been there the previous night? If an abductor came, had he been there the previous night, been disturbed maybe, or not gone through with his crime? 
Robbyn Swan: There was certainly a sense of frustration on the parts of both Kate and Gerry McCann. They were understandably very, very, anxious for things to be happening, and happening fast and when they finally stumbled off to bed for a desperate hour at about four in the morning, alone, they woke early and went out before the first police officers returned and really felt that they were, you know, searching for their daughter alone. 
Kate McCann voice: Obviously, we were up all night and...We just waited for that first bit of light. It was about 6 O'Clock. 
Gerry McCann voice: And then we went out searching, just the two of us, at daylight. 
Kate McCann Voice: And we were just searching...Through the undergrowth, through the bushes. 
Gerry McCann Voice: We were saying over, and over again, ''Just let her be found, just let her be found.'' 
Jon Clarke: Freelance journalist: [In Spanish] Good Morning Hector, how are you? Good Morning, how's everyone doing? [In English] Hi, guys. How are we getting on? All good? Funnily enough, I've kept the hotel bill from the first couple of days on the story. Hotel Belavista, there you go. From the beginning, right from the first day, from the 4th to the 5th. I got a phone call incredibly early. Normally if a job came in from the national papers in England, I'd get a call at 9:30 or half 8, perhaps, and it was 7 or 7:30 and it was the foreign desk at the Mail. They quickly told me that a girl had gone missing, potentially kidnapped, in the south of Portugal in the Algarve and could I get there as quickly as possible to investigate? 
[Male news reporter clip] More on that breaking news this hour. A three-year-old British girl has gone missing in Portugal. It's thought that she may have been abducted. She and her family were staying in a Mark Warner resort. Obviously something wrong has gone on there and we'll bring you more on that story as we find out...
Sandra Felguerias Reporter: In May 2007, the news came, a three-years-old girl disappeared from Praia da Luz and I was standing at my computer, astonished with the news. ''It's impossible, not in our country, not in Algarve. Algarve is the safest place in Portugal.'' And my editor-in-chief told me, ''Go immediately to Algarve.'' 
[UK Female reporter voice]...Praia da Luz in the Algarve. We'll bring you more details on that as we...
Jon Clarke: While on the road, interestingly, I got phone calls from both the Mirror And The Sun also asking if I could cover this case, which is quite rare to have, you know, all the papers asking for you to cover it and so I agreed. I said of course I would file for them as well and keep an eye on the story for them. For me, these stories are often, you know, kind of mysterious, you know? Your job is to go and try and unravel what it is. 
Sandra Felguerias: What motivates me being a journalist is to find the beneath truth that explains everything. I have this feeling inside that I need to run for the news. I need to be there and understand because that's my mission. I just had to go home, pick some clothes, and I was on my way to the Algarve. 
Jon Clarke: I don't think they said whether it was a girl or boy. I don't even think I had the age. I didn't have any idea who the family were. I fully expected to arrive there and for this child to have turned up and for it to have dissolved into a non-story. 
Sandra Felguerias: I was thinking that we go there for two days, she was going to be found in the next hours. 
Jon Clarke: I remember driving in and thinking it was, you know, a fairly pretty place with nice sort of stone walls. I'd never been here before, I didn't know anything about the village at all. I'm pretty sure it's not famous for anything, really. I don't think there's anything that any previous news stories or anything of particular note that's ever happened in Praia da Luz. 
Maria Laurinda Jones: Local resident: I was growing up around this area all the time. Me and all my friends [She points at  a little girl in the photograph of 15 children that she is holding] That's me. I loved it. I loved being a child here. 
Barry Sadler: Local property developer: The real name is Praia da Luz. It was Nossa Senhora da Luz. Our lady of light. Well, you couldn't get your mouth round that on a brochure could you? So now it's been updated to, Praia da Luz, which is, the beach of light. 
[Voice of female UK reporter] The best thing about Luz is it's beautiful, safe and sandy beach. As you can imagine, it's extremely popular with British tourists in the high season but it's equally loved by the Portuguese. 
Barry Sadler: In 1968 when I first came here, that is what this land looks like. [Barry holds up a photograph of Praia da Luz from back then] Just fields. 
Maria Laurinda Jones: My father was a fisherman. But when the sea was rough, he couldn't make any money. It was very hard. There was no jobs. 
[video promoting the Algarve is played] 
Barry Sadler: You want to give it the air of paradise and contintental and summertime, making it look like it was a great place to come to and it was, no doubt about it. 
[Back to video promoting the Algarve]
Maria Laurinda Jones: It gave more work to everybody. Like my sister, she was able to get a job being a maid and have a wage. It gave more jobs to the local men as well because they were building more houses. 
Goncalo Amaral: There have been interesting episodes. I remember many years ago when the tourists discovered that region, there was a British citizen who hoisted a flag by the beach. He had a house by the beach and everyone was outraged. All the fishermen said, ''That is Portuguese territory!'' 
Barry Sadler: People like coming here and people like the thought of having a holiday home. You know, saying ''I've got a villa in the Algarve.'' has a certain cachet about it. [laughs] And people like that. 
[Male reporter promoting the Algarve on an old video is played]
David Jones: This is the Mirage. [David enters the bar, and goes to open the window]  I built this...30 years ago. We have a terrace with--With Sea views. What has happened over the years is this town has grown and grown and grown so we have not much of the sea view left. But that's progress. For 25 years, it was the most popular bar in the area. I met a lot of people. So many bizarre people. Praia da Luz is a honeypot of unusual people, which I find very interesting. A lot of people about who they are and what they've been. They come down here and reinvent themselves. There is a poem, it's called ''Liar Land.'' ''All silver shores and golden sands and every morning, every day. Another liar, comes to stay.'' And it's true! [Laughs] 
Sandra Felguerias: Algarve was always the paradise of the year. I was so free there. Very, very safe. And this is the thing that doesn't fit in my mind. How could this happen in the place where I was when I was a child and when I felt so, so secure?
Goncalo Amaral: The first time I went to the Algarve I was on holiday. The next time I went to the Algarve was to work. They knew me from Lisbon, from prior investigations, and needed a good man and a good team there to fight drug trafficking. 
Rui Gustavo: Journalist: Expresso newspaper: Goncalo Amaral, when he trained, was the best student in his year. In fact, he trained under the current National chief of police. So he was an intelligent guy. 
Goncalo Amaral: There are lots of murders in the Algarve and in our country and bank robberies also occur and other violent crimes. 
Jon Clarke: The main opportunities here are involved in drugs and that's not necessarily for here, that's coming through here by the nature of it's geography, by nature how easy it is to land it. 
Goncalo Amaral: The Algarve is mainly a coastline of beaches and it's not far from Morocco, which is the centre for production of cannabis or hashish resin for Europe. In two and a half hours they can get to the Algarve coast.
Jon Clarke: In Southern Portugal, the Eastern European gangs, the Balkan gangs, you've got four or five big gangs from the UK, from Germany, from France, everyone vying for for attention, everyone finding opportunities. 
Goncalo Amaral: Seventy percent or eighty percent of the hashish that was trafficked to Portugal was apprehended in the Algarve. 
Robert Murat: I was living with my mother at the time. I was in bed when she came and knocked on the door and she told me that she had um, heard it on the news that a child had gone missing in Praia da Luz. 
Woman's reporter UK voice GMTV 4th May 2007: A very serious story is developing and is coming through to us. We can speak now to Jill Renwick, who's a family friend. Have they got any thought's on what happened?
Jill Renwick: She's been taken. She's been taken. That's all they know. 
Robert Murat: Praia da Luz is very small. We lived in a house called Casa Liliana, which was in the middle of the ocean club set-up. I can remember them mentioning Ocean club, so, one of the things we discussed was having a look around the garden, um, because we have low fences, some of the fences are low. So had to look around to see if we could see anything in the garden, which...There was nothing. We're at Casa Liliana, my mother's home here in Praia da Luz. While I was in the garden, I'd met up or had a conversation with over the fence an English gentleman, um, and asked him if he knew what was going on, and he said that a, um, a three-year old had gone missing. and they were having problems communicating with the police. That's when I suggested maybe I should go over there? And he said ''Yes, that would be a very good idea.'' They were struggling making themselves understood and other people that were there with them were struggling to make themselves understood, and actually, that's what I did have, language skills, so that's the only thing I could bring to the table, were the language skills. I was driven, that's for sure. I have a daughter that was relatively the same age as, um, Madeleine. and I felt that everybody should do as much as they could do to find her. 
Cut's back to Jill Renwick on GMTV 4th May 2007: The trouble is that the authorities, the people that might want to help to look to start with, but the police haven't been doing anything since about three O'Clock in the morning. There's a police car sitting there, but nobody's out looking. They really need help out there.
Jon Clarke: I think this is it, this is it, yeah, this is it. This is now what was the Mark Warner complex, the Ocean club. This one here. 5...5a. 
Footage get's played from 2007 - 4th May - Video of Gerry and Kate: Gerry McCann asks someone off camera: ''Where are we going please?.'' [Indistinctive chatter] 
Jon Clarke: I said hello to them. I introduced myself as a reporter from the Mail. And they said ''Hi.'' I think they may have said ''Thanks for coming.'' That was really, unfortunately, all I could get out of them at that point. So there wasn't much opportunity, sadly to talk to them about what had happened, the night before. Initially, there was maybe just a small bit of tape here in front of the apartment, the front and then a bit at the sides, where the patio doors were. 
Cut's to a female Portuguese reporter back in 2007 again showing footage of the tape whilst she is speaking: What happened then? Yesterday, around 7:30 in the morning, her parents--In the night actually...
Jon Clarke: And then there was a note on the steps leading up, saying ''Don't go past this point.'' It went up, and I looked in, the door was open, and I think I tried to speak to them. I didn't want to push my way through the door into the apartment, which would have been a crime scene, so it wouldn't have been appropriate to do that, but I got the impression it wouldn't have been difficult at all to have sort of have walked in and had a look around. You know, I don't think it was...It certainly wasn't fort knox. 
Goncalo Amaral: The initial approach, I won't say it was done badly but inadequate. Why? In Portugal, the disappearance of a human being, the disappearance itself is not a crime. It can't be punished. So the judicial police can't trigger any kind of investigation or use certain techniques and procedures, like wiretapping, for instance, or surveillance, et cetera, otherwise it would be treating it as a crime. Disappearances continue to be considered, in Portugal, as merely something to be investigated. 
Robbyn Swan: On the 4th, Kate and Gerry went to Portimao to give their statements about the incident to the police. One of the things they had stressed was that their friend Jane Tanner had told them of having seen a man crossing the street carrying a small child in pajamas. They firmly believed Madeleine had been taken. Kate and Gerry were interviewed, one at a time. The police officer sat laboriously typing up all of the answers. 
Anthony Summers. The policeman at one point asked, ''Kate McCann, is this your first trip to Portugal?,'' And she snapped back. ''Yes, but it's going to be the last.'' The ground was being laid for what was going to be, in the end, a disastrous relationship.'' 
Goncalo Amaral: I witnessed the statements being given. I didn't ask any questions, but I took part. I did say to the mother of the child that, ''Take it easy. We will do everything in our power to find your daughter.'' 
Cuts back to a female reporters voice on 4th May 2007 again: They have been searching all morning, and last night, as have staff and guests. For now, they have nothing to report. Obviously, everyone here is extremely concerned. One local I spoke to said that everyone who heard about it last night is getting involved. Photocopied pictures of the little girl, are being handed out around town, and both the national guard police and the crime squad are in. So that's the state of affairs at the moment. 
Eileen McCann with Trish Cameron in 2007 on the news clip being played: She's a doctor. He's a cardiologist, a consultant. Saves peoples lives and this is how he gets repayed? Somebody takes his kid. [Sobs] 
Maria Laurinda Jones:  Everybody was looking everywhere and the police were looking, everybody was looking. I went looking to see if I could find anything. I have six children and one of them was only three years old. I was very sorry for the parents. I prayed for the little girl. I prayed a lot for her. 
Jon Clarke: This was a shop I went into and as I came out of the shop, there was an expat woman. She had a flyer, like a flyer, a picture of Maddy, and she was going around, and they were putting them up on walls. ''Have you seen this girl?'' And they had a few, a stack of them, so I said ''Can I take one?'' And really just started walking around the resorts. I'm a father of a small girl who was about to be two in fact. You felt it in the stomach. It's a horrible feeling that, you know. someone's lost a child. That summer, we'd been away in Majorca and we'd left a listening device in our room and gone down to the restaurant. And you go, ''By the grace of God...'' We were down the road slightly with our daughter upstairs in the room of a hotel, but 150, 200 meters away. Everybody did that, and all our friends would do that. You know, it was just a case of as many people helping as possible. The shops were going on as normal, everything was going on relatively normal, apart from a few expats and a few locals who were sort of helping in this search. 
Male reporters voice 2007: It is a striking community effort.  
British man speaking to a reporter in Praia da Luz in 2007: Whenever we've got the spare time, we've just got to chip in a couple of hours or anything every day. It's just got to be done. 
British woman speaking to a reporter in Praia da Luz in 2007: There wasn't any...Any doubt in what we had to do. We all... We all started looking. 
Goes to footage of police on the 4th 2007. 
Jon Clarke: There was a sense that a girl had walked off at night and maybe she was just gonna be found wandering around the field, she'd fallen down a hole, she'd tripped up, she'd banged her head, that she was going to be found. [Jon begins to walk near the apartment and describes as he points] There was a big trench here, from about here...going down, leading down from about here, all the way down the road, about this wide, and six foot deep, and there were two or three guys working in the trench. You kind of think, ''Could she be down there? Could she have fallen down there? Could they have buried her by accident?'' 
Barry Sadler: The algarve, once you leave the main road and the tourist areas, there are wells all over the place. I could take you a ten minute's drive where I live there and you can just go and look down a well, which is, I don't know, 100 ft deep.  Uh, I'm sure the child didn't wander up there by himself, but you don't know, accidents can happen. 
Robert Murat: I worked initially with the GNR. In Portugal, we have multiple versions of police and in Praia da Luz, we have the GNR. They cover anything outside of major towns. And it was small translations of people who may have seen sightings or what they thought might have been something of importance. So I went around and worked with the police and just...Just um, helped out. Between myself and the police, we set up little groups to go and knock on doors. In apartments, through the blocks that were around, and talked to people and asked them if they'd seen or heard anything. It wasn't deep searches. It was just literally talking to them, and asking them if they'd seen anything or heard anything and just having a quick look around. 
UK reporter voice cutting back to 2007: Well, police have just temporarily broken off their search. They've been searching all morning, and, as you said, last night, as have staff and guests. For now, they have nothing to report. Obviously, everyone here is extremely concerned. One local I spoke to said that everyone who heard about it last night has been getting involved. Photocopied pictures of the little girl are being handed out around town and both the National guard police and the crime squad are involved. 
Footage shows police searching with dogs.  Another UK female reporters voice: Officers have launched a Nationwide hunt, alerting ports and airports. At the resort, sniffer dogs have been scouring the area for clues. 
Footage of a female tourist saying to another who are searching: We're trying searching everywhere round here...
Voice of a UK male reporter: As news spread, holidaymakers, resort staff, and villagers joined the operation. 
John Hill speaking on the news: We set up a strategic search, from the right-hand side of the village across to the left. 
Jose Dias Voice: Okay, my name is Jose Dias. I am responsible for the Algarve's tourism board. There is a little bit of negligence from the parents leaving, but I'm very surprised. This is, Uh...It's a strange case. Now, how come a child suddenly disappears from a...an apartment? I'm still very stunned with what's happening. So, as the time goes by, I...I feel a little bit worried. 
Interviewer still in 2007 outside apartment 5a: It's not good for the reputation of the area. 
Julio Barroso Local Mayor: Of course it is not, but I understand as well that after the first thought, after the first way of reaction, people will consider that what happened here could happen anywhere. 
Ernie Allen: I heard about Madeleine's disappearance inititially via media. at the time I was running the National center for missing & exploited children. and I was simultaneously running the international center for missing & exploited children. Today, if your child is reported missing, using technology and the latest information systems, we're getting missing child photos out to the public and to law inforcement almost instantly. What we've seen in the United states and elsewhere, uh, and it's very frustrating to parents, is there's some cases that attract mass media, there's some cases that attract very little attention. My view was always that the determiner was the circumstance of the case. There was a transcendent case in the United states in 1979 New York. 
US Reporter voice on a news footage: Police and neighbors have combed the area around the missing boys home at the 113 Prince street several times over to no avail. 
Ernie Allen: A little boy named Etan Patz, the image of the child was seared into the brains and souls of millions of American's. 
Goes back to reporter and news footage, reporter asking: What are your thoughts now? Do you think the kid is still alive? Do you think he's near here? Voice trails off...
Ernie Allen: Six years old, abducted on the first day he was allowed to walk alone to the bus stop. 
Footage goes to a detective called William Butler in an interview: The chances of the boy coming back alive are less and less. 
Julie Patz speaking: I hope that he's with somebody...Wiser than him, who will take care of him. 
Ernie Allen: There were lots of other child abduction cases at that time. What was it about that case? The circumstance. 
Footage goes back to 1979 and a female reporter saying on the Patz fire escape: Julie Patz says she took her son downstairs, she came back up and watched from this fire escape as he passed down West Broadway towards the bus stop, where a group of other children and parents were waiting. She never dreamed he didn't get on that bus, not until four O'Clock in the afternoon when, he failed to return home. 
Ernie Allen: Do average people, average parents identify with the circumstance? Does a parent think, ''There but for the grace of God go I''? A little boy named Adam Walsh became a transcendent case in 1981. 
Reporters voice in 1981: Adam vanished from a Sears toy department in a Hollywood mall. 
Ernie Allen: The child wandered away from his mother in a Sears store in a shopping mall in South Florida. 
Overlapping voices of Adam's parents: It's changed our life's forever....We want to help them... 
Ernie Allen: How many parents walk an aisle away from their child? 
Adam Walsh in 1981: We were lucky to have him for six and a half years. He was a beautiful little boy. His murder and abduction changed our lives forever...
Ernie Allen: Madeleine's story was like that. If your child isn't safe at a resort, where people are having fun and enjoying themselves, where is she safe? So it translates to every parent everywhere, uh, and the circumstances made it news. 
Back to a UK reporter in 2007: Back to that breaking news this hour, a three-year old British girl has gone missing...
Reporter two: She was asleep in her hotel room at the Mark Warner Ocean club resort in Praia da Luz. 
Robert Hall BBC correspondent: I was a general correspondent in Northern Spain, in Bilbao, to cover a completely different story about a sailing race. 
Hall speaking in 2007 on camera footage on a boat: Thirty thousand miles behind him...
Robert Hall present day: People started to talk about the fact that there was this story developing down in Praia da Luz. It's a missing child in a holiday resort in the summer. It's going to connect with an awful lot of people. 
Sandra Felguerias: We are talking about a three-year old girl. Everybody has children. Everybody's afraid of losing one. 
Robert Hall: For us it was a no-brainer. We needed to get there. We dashed to the airport, flew to Madrid, Madrid to Praia da Luz. Hired a car and drove like mad, and we literally pulled up at five to six, just before the six O'clock news that night.
BBC Reporter on BBC news in 2007 footage in the studio: Let's join Robert Hall, who's on the Algarve for us tonight. Robert. 
Robert Hall in Praia da Luz footage: Well, Ben, Gerry and Kate McCann are still in shock tonight, awaiting news of their missing daughter. We're heading towards 24 hours since she disappeared. It's an event that shocked not only holidaymakers in this resort, but also the inhabitants of this little Portuguese town. They've all been involved...
Jon Clarke: At around five or six, there was build--it was starting to build up. There were already people arriving, journalists were arriving, someone may have come down from Lisbon. I remember the local Portuguese press arriving.  
It cuts to footage of reporters outside 5a...
Sandra Felguerias: When I've arrived there, we were, not many journalists at that moment, maybe, five or six. We were all facing something that we didn't understand at all. 
Robert Hall: And the main question was, how on earth was it possible for somebody to abduct a young child and walk away, or something, without anybody seeing it? 
Footage to 2007 a man says: Nobody found nothing.
Reporter: Do you live here? Do you think it's safe to live here? 
Man: Yes, it's very safe. 
Robert Hall: This is a holiday resort. There's people all over the place. Not to do with us, people just wandering about. 
Sandra Felguerias: From a safe resort in Algarve, in our safe country...
Robert Hall footage overlaps from in 2007: In their conversations with police, Madeleine's parents have made it clear that whilst they didn't take up the offer of child care, they were confident that because the restaurant was so close, it's just over this hedge, they could get to the apartment regularly to check on the children. The police are also trying to work out why, if little Madeleine did wander into the street, she wasn't spotted by somebody in the many apartments that overlook it. 
Robert Hall back to present day: I can't recall in my career going to a story like that where it had happened in those circumstances and in that environment. It was a mystery. 
Female reporter on film footage back on the 4th May 2007: The English Ambassador arrived in Lagos with a team of British investigators specialised in cases of this nature. 
John Buck speaking: I have--Been in touch with the National chief of police during the course of the day and also with the Chief of police here in the Algarve, and they have assured me that everything possible is being done. There is an intensive and extensive search and investigation underway. And that will continue during the night. 
Jon Clarke: We gathered here, hoping to, uh...We were told that at some point, there would be an opportunity to speak to the family, that there was going to be some sort of a press conference. 
Cuts to footage of a Portuguese news room in 2007 Male presenter speaking to a female reporter: A statement from the judicial police and a statement from the parents. We know that in Britain, and North Amarican tradition, parents who go through such things make direct appeals via television to...
Robert Hall: A lot of local Portuguese press and some British journalists, but it wasn't huge, it hasn't really exploded. 
Jon Clarke: They moved the McCann's to a couple of apartments down. And they came out and this was where the press conference was, standing there. [points to outside the apartments] 
Cut to 2007, McCann's coming out of block 5 with others and camera's going off clicking. 
Robert Hall: It was clearly very, very difficult for Gerry, that first night. 
Footage goes back to 2007, Gerry's statement to the press he says: We've got a very short statement to make. 
Male reporter interupts: Sir, could you step forwards please? 
Robert Hall: It was very raw and very early. 
Reporter back in 2007: It's just for the BBC and ITN because of the microphones. 
Gerry McCann continues after moving forward: We've got a very short statement to make. ''Words cannot describe the anguish and despair that we are feeling as the parents of our missing beautiful daughter, Madeleine. We request that anyone who may have any information related to Madeleine's disappearance, no matter how trivial...
Sandra Felguerias overlaps present day: At that moment, all you see is suffering. I remember that I was keep saying to myself, ''You can't cry, you are reporting, you can't cry.'' But at the same time, I feel that this is not news, this is not a story. This is their life. 
Footage back to Gerry in 2007: Please, if you have Madeleine, let her come home to her mummy, daddy, brother and sister. As everyone can understand how distressing the current situation is...
Jon Clarke: It was uh, an incredible moment. You had been working all day, trying to piece together what had been going on, and it just brought it home. 
Sandra Felguerias: I saw a lot of male journalists not crying, but feelng in pain. 
Jon Clarke: This is not solved. This is not good news. There's no body, no one knows where she is, it's almost 24 hours later and no one's any the wiser at all. 
Footage back to Gerry McCann in 2007: We ask that our privacy be respected, to allow us to continue assisting the police in their investigation. Thank you. 
Male reporter in 2007: For the McCann's, it is now a matter of praying for a breakthrough. 
Sandra Felguerias: You don't have a corpse, you don't have a lead, you don't have people to interview. You have nothing. 
Male Reporter in 2007: Let's go to our top story, police investigating the disappearance of Madeleine McCann in Portugal say they are now treating a British man as a suspect who lives just a few hundred meters from the holiday complex where Madeleine was staying with her family. 
GMTV Breaking news: We have some breaking news this morning just coming into us. It is feared that a three-year old British girl has been abducted in Portugal. Local police say the girl was on holiday with her parents in the resort of Praia da Luz in the Algarve. We'll obviously bring you more details on that as we...
Sandra Felguerias: The calender changed. We didn't have any more 3rd of May, 4th of May, 5th of May. We have first day Madeleine disappeared, second day, third. We counted the days for the day that Madeleine was vanished.  
Rev. Hubbard Haynes voice speaking in a church in Kingston, Ontario, Canada: We pray for children all over the world. We pray for Kate and Gerry McCann and for all parents of abducted children. We pray for Madeleine...
Susan Hubbard: We took an overnight flight from Toronto and we landed in Lisbon on May the 5th and I was holding Caspian, who was just five months old, and there was this old, tiny, Portuguese woman and she said. ''Hold onto your baby. Hold onto your baby. There's been an English child taken.'' And I was like, ''What? Where?'' She said, ''Praia da Luz.'' 
Kelvin Mackenzie : She's a very attractive little girl and she disappears on a perfect summer holiday night, and nobody, but nobody, seems to know where she vanished.
Jim Gamble: One or two individuals represented a more significant person of interest. 
Lori Campbell: Certain things about his behaviour just made me feel uneasy. 
The disappearance of Madeleine McCann.

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Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann' Empty Re: Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann'

Post by Jill Havern 16.04.19 11:13

NETFLIX TRANSCRIPT EPISODE 2:




GMTV Breaking news: We have some breaking news this morning just coming into us. It is feared that a three-year old British girl has been abducted in Portugal. Local police say the girl was on holiday with her parents in the resort of Praia da Luz in the Algarve. We'll obviously bring you more details on that as we...
Sandra Felguerias: The calender changed. We didn't have any more 3rd of May, 4th of May, 5th of May. We have first day Madeleine disappeared, second day, third. We counted the days for the day that Madeleine was vanished.  
Rev. Hubbard Haynes voice speaking in a church in Kingston, Ontario, Canada: We pray for children all over the world. We pray for Kate and Gerry McCann and for all parents of abducted children. We pray for Madeleine...
Susan Hubbard: We took an overnight flight from Toronto and we landed in Lisbon on May the 5th and I was holding Caspian, who was just five months old, and there was this old, tiny, Portuguese woman and she said. ''Hold onto your baby. Hold onto your baby. There's been an English child taken.'' And I was like, ''What? Where?'' She said, ''Praia da Luz.'' 
Kelvin Mackenzie : She's a very attractive little girl and she disappears on a perfect summer holiday night, and nobody, but nobody, seems to know where she vanished.
Jim Gamble: One or two individuals represented a more significant person of interest. 
Lori Campbell: Certain things about his behaviour just made me feel uneasy. 
The disappearance of Madeleine McCann.
Part two - Person of interest. 
2 days missing.
Robert Hall: On the surface, it's so banal. A families on holiday, put the children to bed, literally go within sight of the apartment to have dinner. 
Robert Hall footage going back to 2007: I think the key, Ben, is for them to try and piece together what may have happened here. If you look at the geography... 
Robert Hall present day: You take it in turns to go and check the children. It's all so routine. 
Reporter in 2007: All they had to do was come out of the poolside tapas bar there, come up this pavement. Behind this white wall, it's very difficult to see what's going on inside the restaurant area, but it is interesting to note that on this little alleyway here, you can actually get a sight through the hedge of what's going on, so anybody watching would be able to see exactly who's coming and who's going because just here, well, this is actually the McCann's flat...
Another reporter: It's also quite public It's overlooked by big apartments on the otherside of the road. Now, there are quite a few people staying here...
Robert Hall present day: I keep coming back to the question which was there on the very first day, which is ''How?'' How is it possible for some stranger to know that those children are alone, go in, remove one child without waking up the others or apparently waking up the child that they're taking? They then make their way out again. They don't know for sure when the next person from the dinner party is going to come up and in through those doors. They're going out into a lit street. I guess the only conclusion you can draw is that somebody was watching that apartment, somebody planned it. 
Sandra Felguerias as footage is being shown of the press in 2007: I've never been surrounded by so many journalists from the UK, then they start coming  from other countries, Belgium, Spain, even from the United states.
UK male Reporter in 2007: We're dancing around the worlds press. 
Portuguese famale reporter in Portuguese:...But only correspondents from British dailies. - Now, lots of journalists...-There really are a lot of people.
Sandra Felguerias in Portuguese: - And everyone is asking the question, is it possible to find Maddie?
Sandra Felguerias present day in English: We were so many for that little road in front of the Ocean club....
[Footage 2007 camera shutter clicking] 
Sandra Felguerias present day in English:...That we are trying to dispute the territory. ''Oh God, I need to put my camera. Can you please go away? Can you please just let me do this live report now?'' 
Sandra Felguerias in 2007 in Portuese: All in all, four houses have been searched...
UK female journalist speaking: Speaking to holidaymakers here, no one can quite believe what's happened.
Jayne Jensen present day: You feel misplaced. You're on holiday, this disaster's happened. If you can imagine this sort of sleepy, beautiful holiday resort and suddenly there's just people everywhere. The media circus was growing by the minute. Every newspaper was there. TV stations, helicopters, SKY news and everything all around. And everybody wants their story. We felt we were scurrying around because it just felt so under the spotlight. So we went back to our apartment actually, and we stayed there because you didn't know where to go, what to do. 
Male holidaymaker speaking to the press in 2007: There have been dogs, there's been helicopters, The police have been here again this morning. The dogs...
Neil Berry present day: Everywhere we went, it was busy with press trying to interview us, following us around. I remember them saying ''Just give us a piece to camera and we'll go away. Just tell us what's going on.'' 
[Female report to Neil Berry in 2007 footage]...Find anything? He shakes his head.
Neil Berry present day: There's just a sense of desperation. 
[Female reporter to Neil in 2007: No signs, no witness? - Neil replies: Nothing. Female reporter: No one saw anything? Neil shakes head: Nothing.]
Footage of the McCann's and twins coming out of the Ocean club reception. 
Richard Hall: Clearly at that point, questions were beginning to form because you do hope as a parent that your child is going to reappear within hours. All they could do was sit in that resort and wait. 
[Male reporter 2007] For the second consecutive night, Gerry and Kate McCann emerged to ask for help. 
[Gerry McCann 2007 appeal on the 5th] We would again like to appeal for any information, however small, that may lead to the safe return of Madeleine. 
[Male reporter 2007] Tonight, everyone involved knows there can be no letup if there's a real chance that this little girl can come home safe. 
3 Days missing...May 6th 2007
Footage in PDL surrounding Ocean club as voices are speaking...
[News anchor] Seven minutes past six, still nothing in the search for little Madeleine McCann. Our correspondent...
[Male reporter]...There's been no official comment by the Portuguese police in terms of interviews or a press conference, and that is causing confusion here.
Present day: Goncalo Amaral. I remember on the first few days, I would leave the police facilities and nobody would know me. 
Cuts back to 2007 a woman UK reporter speaking on camera: The information is very slow to come from the Portuguese authorities. 
Goncalo Amaral present day: Praia da Luz was crowded with journalists and TV crews. At first I thought, ''Thank God, nobody knows me.'' But then things started to get more complicated. 
[Female UK reporter in 2007] Portuguese police don't give out information as the investigation is progressing. For us, that's quite strange and I think it's taken...
Goncalo Amaral speaking present day: People have the right to be informed that the police are doing something, but our judicial framework in criminal and procedural terms, is based on secrecy. It creates a safeguard for the investigation to find the truth. That's the reason this principle exists. In order not to jeopardize the investigation. 
[Male reporter in 2007 1] Police here can't rely on CCTV footage.  It's a rarity in Portugal, with the exception of petrol stations. We're told a member of staff noticed a woman and a child matching Madeleine's description.
[U.S male reporter] A little girl who looks similar to Madeleine was seen on CCTV holding hands with a woman just a few hours after she disappeared from the resort in Portugal. 
[UK male reporter] Now, what these reports suggest is that a member of the public noticed a man with a girl answering Madeleine's description behaving in an unusual way in a supermarket in the town...
Robert Hall present day: There's a lot of speculation going on. 
[Female UK reporter from a helicopter in 2007] There are reports of one witness seeing a bald man dragging a blonde girl...
[Male UK reporters voice overlaps the females] There's talk of a bald man seen disappearing down towards the marina, but nobody can substantiate that.
Robert Hall present day: It was clear that we were at arms length  from official police information. We had to just make assumptions from what we could see going on as to what their stragety was.  
Robert Hall footage speaking in 2007: But all anybody wants is some hard news of this little girl...
Sandra Felguerias present day: We were 24 hours a day live, knowing nothing. 
Video footage cuts to 2007 Sandra Felguerias speaking on camera:...Imagine a three-year old child in pajamas...
Sandra Felguerias present day: All we knew is that she was missing. 
Jon Clarke: Yeah, from the first day, I've got original high definition pictures. This is the police arriving for example, with sniffer dogs. [Jon is sat at his desk pointing at pictures on his laptop screen] at about four or five O'Clock in the afternoon on the first day. By this point there were quite a lot of detectives in Lagos and none of them knew what to do or were doing anything. This is the Policia judiciaria, [chuckling] which is a funny looking headquarters. You can just about make out the police badge here. See all the detectives? Look at them, all plain clothes chaps, scruffy looking buggers. Look at them all wondering what to do next. 
Goncalo Amaral: There has to be a fast response from the police stastically the first 72 hours for police to do their work and make progress. 
4 days missing.
[Helicopter sounds] Robert Hall: From up here, you get a real sense of the problems faced by a small police force. There are hundreds of small apartments and villas here, all of them have got to be checked. More difficult for a police force that is already stretched. 
Anthony Summers present day: This is a time when typically the population of the area of Praia da Luz triples from some 400,000 to 1.5 million people. 
Ernie Allen: It's difficult. It's particularly difficult for small police departments with limited resources. It's particularly difficult for small police departments that haven't worked these kinds of cases before. 
[Male UK Reporter in 2007 camera footage of the police showing as they're speaking]...These pictures of police on the Spanih border are deeply worrying. The officers are supposed to be checking vehicles leaving Portugal. Instead, for 40 minutes, they sit in their own cars out of the rain. 
Ernie Allen present day: Time is the enemy in the search for a missing child. 
[Same male UK reporter 2007] A van with blacked-out windows drives by and this just hours after Madeleine went missing. 
Ernie Allen present day: The Portuguese judicial police were slow to implement things like checks on the highways, roadblocks, looking for the possibility of a fleeing abductor. 
Goncalo Amaral: A long time had passed since the childs disappearance and the time to go from Portugal to another country is within an hour, an hour and a half, you could cross the border. There are things which are virtually impossible for us to stop. 
[UK male reporter back to 2007 speaking] At a news conference this evening and under mounting pressure, the police finally, and perhaps belatedly, provided a description of someone they would like to interview. 
Olegario Desousa - Chief inspector Policia judiciaria: We appeal to the person, Caucasian. approximately 35-40 years of age, medium built, approximately 5 feet, 10 inches tall and was possibly carrying a child or an object that could have been taken as a child. 
Goncalo Amaral, Present day: At the beginning of the investigation, a police artist was used to draw what Jane Tanner described as a man she'd seen with a child in his arms. 
[Richard Bilton] Take the e-fit of a suspect One was produced and this shopkeeper was shown it by detectives. 
Simon Russell speaking about the egg with a side parting e-fit which was claimed the Portugal police released: It was an oval shape with hair on it. Uh, no definable features, no nose, no mouth, no eyes. Um...
[Male UK reporter] Of course, the description is frustratingly vague, but it's importance lies in the timing. 
[Reporter in Portuguese]...He described the sketch to us and his words were ''An egg with hair.'' 
Goncalo Amaral, present day:  She describes the hair and the drawing ends up looking like an egg and it was even published which was ridiculous. Why would you publish something like that? 
[News anchor In the UK interviewing Jill Renwick - 2007] We're joined by a family friend of the McCann's, Jill Renwick, good morning. 
Jill Renwick: Good morning. 
News anchor: Have you spoken directly to them in the last little while? 
Jill Renwick: The last text I got from Kate was, ''I have no faith in the Portuguese police, please help.'' Then we phoned everybody we knew that would maybe have an influence or would know somebody, politician's and press, just to see if they could get any kind of help there. 
Jim Gamble present day: The McCann's had connections through family with people in the media and they engaged whoever they could to heighten awareness of this. 
Back to 2007 - Kate McCann's direct appeal with Gerry McCann.
[Man in background filming] Okay, quiet please. Okay, in your own time.
Kate McCann looking at the camera. We would like to say a few words to the person who is with Madeleine or has been with Madeleine. Madeleine is a beautiful, bright, funny, and caring little girl....
Goncalo Amaral Present day: I think it was premature. It puts pressure on the kidnapper. If there is a kidnapper. The kidnapper knows that from then on, they're after him. 
[Footage back to Kate McCann's appeal 2007] Please tell us where to find her...Or put her in a place of safety...
[Gerry McCann from a press conference in 2007 holding up a picture of Madeleine Vatican Radio:] For anyone who's listening who may have been in the Algarve, there is...
[Reporter] People are being asked to look out for her distinctive right eye. 
Goncalo Amaral Present day: That birthmark made her stand out from all the other children. As a colleague of ours said, that mark was a death mark and if we make this public, it can put the child at risk. It puts her survival at risk. 
[Footage goes back to Kate's direct appeal 2007] We beg you to let Madeleine come home. We need our Madeleine and Madeleine needs us. 
Phil Hall PR consultant & former newspaper editor,  present day: It's a very difficult choice. You either face it or you run away. And in their situation, their first though was, ''The more publicity we get, the more chance of getting Maddie back. 
[Male reporter, 2007 footage of Kate and Gerry] Today is Mother's day in Portugal. It is customary for daughters to give their mothers flowers on this spring morning. 
Rev  Haynes Hubbard: inside the church in PDL: The context of this service is to cling to whatwe know...
Susan Hubbard: We'd been there a few days and we spent the night in our new home there knowing this child had been taken, but we had no idea as to the magnitude that was awaiting for us the next morning, which was our first Sunday in Luz as the new priest of the Algarve. and that was the first time I met Kate. 
Haynes Hubbard: We arrived for the English service, which started at Noon. then the doors opened..
.[footage of Kate at the doors of the church, camera's clicking people hugging her]
Haynes Hubbard back to present day: ...And we heard this strange sound. -Ch-Ch-Ch-Ch...-Yeah, it was just a strange...It sounded like crickets or something. 
[Cameras clicking again footage 2007 Kate and Gerry outside the church]
Haynes Hubbard: Hundreds, ranks and ranks and ranks of cameras, taking pictures of this mum and dad who didn't know where their child was. 
[Footage of a local speaking to the press  in 2007 outside the church, speaking in Portuguese]  I just hope for the parents that the little girl reappears. for all of us who have children. 
Local woman 2 speaking in Portuguese to the press: There's no words to describe what we saw in her heart. 
Male local 3 in Portuguese to press: The local community undertands the parents anguish. It affects all of us.
[Footage shows local women outside the church crying.]
[Camera shutters clicking as Gerry stands outside the church]
Kate McCann holding cuddle cat speaking to the press: Gerry and I would just like to express our sincere gratitude and thanks to everybody, but particularly the local community here, who have offered so much support. I couldn't ask for more. I just want to say thank you. Please continue to pray for Madeleine. She's lovely. [Shutters clicking as Kate and Gerry walk away]
Goncalo Amaral present day: The searches for the child with the support of other residents and the GNR were always searches for a living child. 
Back to 2007 [Reporter 1] I think they're aware of internation media pressure...
[Reporter 2] The police operation has been ramped up, though. We're told 150 detectives have been called in, working three-day shifts here while juggling... 
Goncalo Amaral present day whilst still showing footage of 2007 police searches: One of the most important things when a child disappears is to do an investigation of the neighborhood. You see who lives there, how long they have lived there, who doesn't live there, who arrived recently. 
[Reporter speaking 2007] Changes in the police operation as we're passing new roadblocks, Roadchecks that are being set up. There are police combing a campsite...
[Reporter 2 in Portuguese] Hundreds of apartments of all the tourists complexes of the Praia da Luz are being searched by the judicial police. There is no door left unopened.
[Helicopter thrumming sound] 
Ernie Allen speaking present day as footage still being shown from 2007: There should be an organized, scientific grid search. Yes, you should search the derricks and the fields and bodies of water. But that's not all you do. At the same time, you search for that child as if she's alive, and if law enforcement is prepared and moves quickly, the likelihood of safe recovery of this child is very high. 
[English woman speaking in 2007] It doesn't happen here, you know? You just don't hear of it and it's just such a shock and, you know, just everybody wants to help and see what they can do. 
Phil Hall present day: On the whole, people did rally round. Local Portuguese were turning out and they were assisting the police as much as they could. 
[Male reporter as video being shown of locals and police searching in 2007] As every hour passes, more have volunteered. Local residents, holiday makers. They may lack expertise...
Robert Murat present day as footage in 2007 shows him speaking with some police officers: I actually spent most of my time with the police at the other side of the police cordon with the GNR who were working at the site. It felt there was an excitement in the air, something...Maybe excitements the wrong word, but there was this energy going on there. People were incredibly positive that they would actually find her. 
[Footage of a female reporter speaking in Portuguese showing BBC footage of Madeleine as she is speaking]...Whoever has the child gives some information...
Robert Murat's voice speaking over hers present day: At that time, there was a lot of press about. Journalists flitting around in every direction, every sense, trying to discover what had happened and trying to get as much information as possible from every angle. My mum set up a stall and this is where I'm saying the community came together...
Jenny Murat speaking on camera at her stall in 2007: They might not be comfortable to speak. Um...But here, they can come and they can write it down. I'm not going to ask their name or anything so they might be more comfortable. Let's see if something turns up. Let's hope we get something. 
[BBC news footage, female news anchor speaking still in 2007] Police in Portugal confirm, Madeleine McCann was abducted from her holiday apartment. Detectives say they believe the three-year old is still alive. 
[In Portuguese Guilhermino Encarnacao director Policia Judiciaria speaking to press in 2007] In the Portuguese legal system, an abduction is not just where ransom is requested. If someone takes someone away to abuse them sexually, that is what we're working on. 
[Male UK reporter speaking] If you can just show the camera over the wall, and that is the window where it's suspected that possibly the intruder went in. 
Jon Clarke speaking present day whilst footage of apartment 5a outside is being shown. We had police confirmation that they were looking into well known paedophiles, British and German, who lived in the area that were on the sex offenders database that had come here and that were on an official inerpol list, which was really, straightaway, quite... sinister. 
[Footage of Lori Campbell speaking, the Sunday Mirror newspaper journalist in 2007 to the camers] I spoke to my news desk...
Jon Clarke speaking over her present day: Lori Campbell was the reporter on the ground for the Sunday Mirror and we went off to local villages, looking into known paedophiles in the area. I remember driving in and thinking, you know, it was a fairly pretty place...
Jim Gamble: There were a large number of sex offenders who had been in the broader geographic footprint. Is that unusual? No. Number one, sex offenders take holidays like everybody else. Number two, some of them will go out there for their own predatory reasons because they've got access to children, young people who are scantily clad in an environment where it's easy to blend. 
[London. United Kingdom. 2007 news anchor] Police investigating the abduction of Madeleine McCann are appealing for anyone who stayed at the resort in Praia da Luz in the fortnight before she disappeared to come forward with their holiday photographs. British detectives....Voice trails off.
Jim Gamble 2007: We don't want photographs of scenery. We don't want photographs simply of their family. We want the public to look at the photographs they've taken and consider who else is there in the background. 
[Camera shutters clicking as footage shows holidaymakers PDL 2007 on the beach] 
Jim Gamble present day: We knew where the McCann's had visited, which beaches they had gone to, where they'd been around the pool and elsewhere, so we'd scan the photographs against those areas that we knew the McCann's had frequented. 
Gerry McCann speaking in an interview with Kate in 2007: That also allows anyone who has photographs to upload them at www...
Jim Gamble present day: Because very often, a predator, if they are incited to offend by some contact with a child that they suddenly feel drawn to, the likelihood of them watching them for a period of time is quite strong. [Footage in 2007 shows Gamble showing a huge TV screen at a conference ceop.upload and Madeleine's picture] We were desperate to help and we were trying to be as inovative as we could by using the technology that we had to do that. 
Gerry McCann continues speaking in the interview with Kate in 2007: And I would strongly encourage anyone 'cause we truly believe that somebody who has been here or lives here will have seen something or knows something suspicious about someone that will lead us to get Madeleine back safely. 
7 days missing...8 days missing...Child playing on the beach on a swing slowly. [Heartbeat echoing sound]
[Uk woman holiday maker 2007 PDL speaking to a press interview camera 1] The longer it goes on, the more concerned I become because while there's somebody out there, it preys on your mind. You know, initially I thought that this little girl had wandered off. Then when you hear that she has been abducted, you start to panic. 
UK woman holidaymaker 2 outside the Ocean club reception with her child. I haven't slept. I've probably slept no more than 2 hours a night since it's happened. I just keep getting up to check on her.
Jon Clarke present day: The locals have suspicions and a lot of people had suspicions, but you didn't know. You couldn't know. It was very hard to know. So it was a horrible kind of climate of fear and paranoia here. 
Robert Hall in 2007: ...Runs a restaurant just a mile from the scene of the kidnapping. Today he'd told me he'd seen a man acting oddly. 
Restaurant owner describing the stranger: Uh, he had white dirty pants. 
Robert Hall: He seemed a little out of place?
Restaurant owner: He was out of place, absolutely. 
A man and woman local with a Portuguese accent: Man speaking: We saw somebody, small hair, short hair. Woman speaks: -Short.
Jim Gamble present day: You're really clutching at straws. But, of course, sometimes in investigations, it's about luck and, actually, in the best investigations, you make your own luck. And there were one or two individuals who represented a more significant person of interest than some others. 
Jon Clarke: The very first person I bumped into was a guy here outside who I later discovered was Robert Murat, who said he was helping the family, doing some translation, was filling people in on what was happening. He'd told me what time she'd gone missing, that...The age, her name. I think maybe it was him that used the name Maddie, rather than Madeleine, 'cause the parents called her Madeleine, and I don't know if they used the nickname Maddie.
Robert Hall in 2007 describing footage of Kate and Gerry walking in PDL:...Clutching the little pink toy that was Maddie's favourite...
Robert Murat overlaps speaking present day: I'd been approached by a lot of the press.I remember one of the guys asking me what color were the pajamas, for example, or what was she wearing, and that's the first time I met people within the group McCann's. And I did ask them that question. I can't remember if they did give me the answer or the answer came back later. I can't remember the exact details, but I did ask that question.
Jon Clarke: A fairly engaging, but slightly strange fellow. Slightly unsual shall we say. He was just...There, just standing around. It was almost like he'd decided, he was gonna be the liason officer, you know, the public liason officer, just to talk to press and to help out. I mean, he could have just been trying to help, like people are. They just wanted to do their best so, you know, he lived locally, he worked locally, so he probably just wanted to help. 
[Cuts to 2007, Portuguese reporter speaking] We have little information about the potential suspect. An identity portrait has been done. Other than that, I can't say anything else. 
[In Portuguese a reporter speaking amongst other muffled voices] No information about this suspect is being made public. We don't know if it's a man or woman, or if they're Portuguese or if they are English. The same nationality as the parents. Um, the appeals...
[Robert Hall 2007] Everybody is pulling together, but we still need and the police still need the piece of that jigsaw that could lead them to Madeleine.
Jon Clarke, present day: We were all camped out in a bar in Praia da Luz  and I was unwinding after, you know, a fairly hard day. 
Robert Hall: We were sort of saying. ''What have you heard? Have you heard this? Have you heard that?'' And in the course, of all of these conversations, Robert Murat's name was mentioned. There was this chap who lived on his own, spent a lot of time sort of talking to journalists and, you know, finding out what was going on. 
Jon Clarke: Initially, I probably kept them to myself, but then Lori Campbell, a reporter from the Sunday Mirror, I think she also found the guy a little bit strange. She asked him various questions about what his involvement was and he'd been very vague with her. 
Robert Murat: [As he's speaking it shows a picture of himself with Lori Campbell and another woman journalist] At some stage, I was speaking, to a couple of female journalists, one of those being Lori Campbell. While we were having this chat, I noticed, Um, a journalist or a photographer, in this case, taking photographs of me.  I actually got a bit annoyed about it. I actually said to him, ''Look, I'm not sure why you're taking photographs. Please don't use those photographs.'' Um...And ''No no, it's nothing, it's nothing.'' I said. ''Well, it is, because that guys taking photographs of me and I have no idea why.'' 
Jon Clarke. I think she'd felt there was something unusual about him from the Soham investigation in England, the Soham crime, the two young girls who'd gone missing. 
[Female UK reporter during the Soham search] The two missing girls were captured on CCTV in this sports center car park. These are thought to be the last images of Holly and Jessica. 
[Male interviewer speaking to Ian Huntley] Reporter: You're the school caretaker. The girls, Jessica and Holly would know you and they saw you on the front doorstep. What went on?
Ian Huntley: The girls--I don't know the girls. Um, I stood on the front doorstep, grooming my dog down. She'd run away and come back a bit of a mess. 
Jim Gamble present day: If you look at the murders of Holly and Jessica, high profiles murders of two children in the UK...
[Ian Huntley's voice over laps Jim Gamble's from that earlier interview then goes on to the footage] It doesn't help the fact that I was one of the last people to see them, if not the last person to speak to them. Um, I keep reliving that conversation and thinking perhaps something different could have been said, perhaps kept them here a little bit longer. 
Jim Gamble present day: The school caretaker, Ian Huntley, had been out and about, had been offering help, had been offering support, had been talking to the media.
[Ian Huntley to a reporter again speaking] And off they walked in the direction of the library over there. 
Jim Gamble, Present day: He was asking questions to ilicit a little bit more information for himself, which ultimately led him to becoming a suspect. 
[Ian Huntley speaking to a reporter on the news again] It's very frustrating, knowing we have... People that way inclined amongst [He smiles] us and us not knowing who they are. 
[Uk male news anchor in a TV news studio] Ian Huntley guilty of murder...[Reporter]...Murdered Holly and Jessica and left their bodies in a ditch to rot, but not once did he turn to their parents in court and say ''I'm sorry.'' [Anchor] ''You showed no mercy, no regret,'' The judges words as he sent him down for life.
Jim Gamble present day: People in proximity, people who offer themselves up to provide help, support, or appeals, then of course that fits a profile, and that was mirrored in what people saw in the earlier behaviour of Robert Murat. 
Robert Hall: There had been the Ian Huntley issue. He came over and said. ''I can be helpful.'' So enter Robert Murat who also said, ''I can be helpful.'' 
Jon Clarke: It was a bit odd. You get two journalists together with a feeling in their stomach that something's not quite right, that it needs to be acted on. I think you need to do something about it. So she went and reported this guy had been acting strangely. 
10 days missing
Robert Murat present day: I went to dinner. That's when I first realised there was a car behind me. When I left, I realised the car then, was following me again. When I got before the campsite in Luz, I pulled over and the car went past. I let him go past and I went behind him. I then decided, because I felt I was being followed, to go to the PJ office. I went upstairs, knocked on the door. No one answered. No one was there. I then ran the inspector that was in charge of the Luz operation and explained the situation. I said, ''Look, I think I'm being followed. Um...If you want to talk to me, I'm right here. Come and talk to me. If there's...'' You know, and he said, ''No, No, No, it's nothing to do with us. It's just journalists.'' So, I got back in my car and then drove out and saw the same car that had been following me...And chased it. Which wasn't the smartest thing to do, I don't suppose. After getting the registration, I went back to Casa Liliana. I rang the police inspector and told him that I was being followed and he said, ''But, it's not us.'' I said ''Okay.'' He said, ''But why don't I come down and we'll go for a drink in Lagos?'' I said, ''Okay.'' So this was quite late by this time. So he came down with another guy and so we all went into Lagos. I actually believe they wanted to get me pissed. Unfortunately for them, I don't drink. I...I drank a coffee. 
Goncalo Amaral: Robert Murat started as a translator for some witness statements that were collected in Praia da Luz. After that, someone implicated that he could be involved in the child's disappearance. We had a surveillance team following Robert Murat. We tapped his phones and even his house was under suveillance. Robert Murat's house was scanned with a radar device to attempt to determine how many people were inside the house. 
Robert Murat: The next morning at seven O'Clock, they called me and said that they had a breakthrough and they needed me to go and do some translating for them, which I said, ''Okay, give me a few minutes. Let me just get up.'' So, I literally got up out of bed, put my jumper on. ''They need me now.'' Went to the gate, and that's when they raided the house. 
[Footage of Murat's being shown with Police - 2007]
[Female UK reporter] Dawn at Casa Liliana, 200 yards from where Madeleine McCann went missing and in unmarked cars, police arrived to begin the largest search of this investigation. 
Robert Hall: Present day as footage being shown in 2007 at Murat's with the police: Somebody said, ''The police are going into Murat's house.'' And everybody just went. Everybody ran down the road. 
[2007 Portuguese woman reporter in Portuguese speaking]...And where the commotion continues with all the journalists trying to report the story.  The suspect is none other than an Englishman...
Sandra Felguerias present day as footage from Murat's in 2007 still is being shown: The Portuguese police was inside his house, excavating, and the attentions were not longer on the flat where Madeleine was vanished, but all the journalists went to Robert Murat's house. 
[Sandra Felguerias  reporting in 2007 In Portuguese] The police were always aware of Robert Murat as the suspect who was behind Madeleine's disappearance...
[Male reporter UK] They have been here since seven a.m. A tent sits on the drive and beneath it, forensic officers work. 
[Uk male reporters voice and blurry footage] Who lives there?
[Jenny Murat] Here?
 [Reporter] Yes. 
[Jenny Murat] Me.
[Reporter] Do you know why they're searching? Why are they searching? 
[Jenny Murat] I don't know, no. I can't say anything. 
[Lori Campbell]  I've been at the scene quite a lot over the weekend, on a Saturday and Sunday, Um...And certain things about his behavior just made me feel uneasy so...So, um...[Voice trails off]
Robert Hall Present day speaking over Lori's voice: You know, an awful lot of journalists and that's our job, to notice stuff and to, you know, put two and two together and people were beginning to put two and two together. 
[Lori Campbell 2007] Um, he has a wife and a child back in the UK, in the North of Englahd, and he's going through a divorce at the moment. He was just too close to the investigation. Um, he was spending far too much time talking to the media...
Sandra Felguerias present day: I saw Robert Murat there the first or second day trying to help, like we were trying to help. 
[Female UK reporter 2007] To give you some indication as to how close the two properties are, the house Madeleine was taken from is at the end of this street. You only have to move around 200 yards up it to find the house that the police are now searching down amongst the greenery with the green tarpaulin. 
Sandra Felguerias present day: Maybe I'm too innocent and I didn't thought about that possibility, but...Maybe he's the guy. 
Robert Murat: They came in, they went into the house. My bedroom, they took everything, and...And then stuck me in a police car and off I went to the PJ headquarters in Portimao. I remember being scared. That I do remember 'cause I had no idea. Because I felt, ''Be honest, be truthful, get over this. They'll carry on with their thing, they'll find out that you had nothing to do with it.'' But they didn't want that. It wasn't what they wanted.  Um, they wanted me to confess. There was a couple of PJ officers, one typing and one asking questions, and it was a long process because the typing was two-fingered typing. None had the skills of a typist. They didn't give me any food, they didn't give me any water. Um, nothing. 
Goncalo Amaral: On that day I was at the police headquarters. A normal investigation was carried out. 
Robert Murat: Multiple people came shooting in and it felt quite threatening and telling me that I was guilty and my time was up and the more I said I hadn't done, the more they said I lied and was lying and I had done it. I hadn't got a clue what was going on. Um...Uh, I was a mess. I had no...I literally wasn't functioning. I actually felt I was being set up. I felt like they were gonna do anything and everything to...Um...Make it me. 
[Male reporter 2007 outside PJ headquarters at night] It was the middle of the night when they left. Disappearing into the darkness with Robert Murat. 
[Olegario De Sousa at a press conference the next day] A 33-year-old male living in the area of the events was named as a formal suspect. This male was interrogated as such, but no evidence was collected in order to ground his arrest and subsequent judicial interrogation. 
Jon Clarke present day: Being an arguido in Portugal is an unusual word. It doesn't mean you're charged. It means that you're...You're more than just a suspect. You actually become officially a suspect. It's quite a serious thing for the police to do that. 
[Robert Murat surrounded by press and having questions fired at him in 2007] You'll have to ask the PJ. 
[Reporter] It seem's it's going to be the end...- Sir, what do you think?
[Robert Murat] You'll have to ask the P that. 
[Reporter] Are you happy?
[Robert Murat] You'd have to ask the PJ that question. 
[Reporter] But they don't talk to us. 
[Robert Murat] There's a reason for that.
[Reporter] Sorry?
[Robert Murat] There's a reason for that.
[Reporter 2] What do you think of this operation?
[Reporter 3] What is your opinion?
[Reporter 1] Robert?
Jon Clarke present day: I think just because he was released didn't necessarily mean that he wasn't involved and didn't mean that any of the people around him weren't involved. It meant there wasn't enough evidence to charge him. For me, it almost, in some ways, justified my job that the initial suspicions I had about this man were being taken seriously and actually could lead to potentially a conviction. It was a very tangible, very interesting developement in the case. 
[2007 footage a male reporter UK speaking in a helicopter overhead Ocean club PDL] Over the last 36 hours, the investigation into Madeleine's disappearance appears, for the first time, to have found some focus. 
Robert Hall present day: We're all amature detectives in a way under those circumstances and we all sit there trying to piece together what we know and make something of it. There's a fair chance, I think a lot of people, ''Well, this could be the breakthrough. Here it is, it all fits.''  
[Richard Bilton in 2007] So this seems to be a big developement, seems to be things moving quickly, but we don't know where it will lead. We just know that tonight, we do have a named formal suspect and he lived in this house. [Points to Murats house] 
[Male UK reporter 2] Leaving a property still behind police tape, Jenny Murat, a ''find Madeleine'' poster in the back window, her son at the center of the enquiry. 
Local Portuguese resident, a woman speaking in Portuguese: I haven't seen him more than once. I got the feeling he wasn't totally normal. 
Ralph Eveleigh, Robert Murat's uncle: His mother says, on that night the kid disappeared, they were both in the house together all night, so...[shrugs]
Local UK woman resident/friend: I just hope it's all solved pretty soon, his name is cleared and, you know, I think it's disgusting that his name's been mentioned without pure evidence.
Robert Murat present day: I can remember just pacing around the house and around in circles and not being able to stop and going round and round and round and round...Uh, Just--I can remember...Just not...being able to put two lines together, two words together, two anything together. Putting myself in a room in the dark and crawling up on a chair and just wanting to die. Just absolutey...Um...Hell on earth. 
Kelvin MacKenzie: A tabloid take on news is not one that necessarily stimulates the intellect. It stimulates the emotion. You're stimulated from the moment of the headline or the moment of the lead of he telecast, that when you read something, you say ''My God!!!'' He turns out to be an estate agent. Guilty! He turns out to have a bit of a dodgy eye. Guilty! He turns out to want to be helpful. Double guilty! 
[Headlines from 2007 flicker on the screen - Headline 1 - He turned out to be just like Huntley.  - Headline 2- Suspect or scapegoat?]
Jon Clarke: You have to put the whole Robert Murat case, you know, that he's a slightly unusual looking fella and he had an ex-wife back in England and a daughter the same age as Maddie, which was even more...Strange. 
[Cuts to footage in 2007 in a helicopter above the Ocean club - Male reporter speaks] Flying over the apartments from the east, we travel down the road and after a couple of seconds, the villa where Robert Murat lives quickly comes into view. This was where police collected the man they describe as a formal suspect early yesterday morning...
Jon Clarke present day: The fact that there's almost a line of sight from his house to the apartment, there was a feeling that maybe the family had been watched for a few days to see what their movements were. 
[Richard Bilton, reporter - speaking on camera in 2007] 'Cause it does feel like this man is the center of this enquiry and yet he hasn't been charged, he hasn't even been arrested, and all of this, the searches and everything, could come to nothing. 
[UK male reporter] We've learned that police also searched his residential building where Mr Murat's brother-In-Law, Paolo Miguel lives. Detectives also searched this tidy, well kept hotel. In the village of Burgau. It's owned by Mr Murat's cousin, Sally Eveleigh. 
Kelvin MacKenzie present day: The Portuguese police, by the way, are briefing the old journos left, right and center because they actually want this to turn out to be...Somebody like him because that would then clear the air for the tourism in the area. 
[Cuts to an interview outside the Ocean club with Kate and Gerry McCann in 2007] Portuguese reporter asks them both. But did you know Robert Murat? Gerry McCann: I'm not going to comment on that. [Clears throat]
[Male UK reporter] And the regional government's president says the events of the last two weeks are putting those who have come here to relax. 
[Julio Barroso] I would like to ask all the journalists, please remember that you could be the one in the house in holiday. 
Kelvin MacKenzie, present day: The last thing you need was the idea that there could be a Portuguese pedo-Murderer around. 
13 days missing
[2007 a Portuguese reporter speaking in Portuguese in a helicopter about Murat's house] As far as we know, from inside the house, the crime scene investigators took different types of tech equiptment. 
[Female Portuguese reporter in Portuguese as footage plays outside Murat's house] They follow this lead, apparently of a paedophile with no criminal record, an English paedophile residing in Praia da Luz. Also, we didn't see the images, but agents were seen holding video cassets. We're probably talking about a sexual motive, about a paedophile...
[News fanfair playing whilst showing Murat's picture] [Anchor speaks in Portuguese] Good afternoon. A man was made an arguido in the case of the disappearance of Madeleine. Robert Murat, he's 35 years old...
Sergey Malinka, Present day: I remember when I find out that Robert has been interviewed by police and I was like, ''Woah! This is the guy I'm doing a website for.'' I mean, I know him, I know him. I'd been working day and night so I didn't pay much attention at the very beginning, Thinking, ''Is it true or not?'' Because I got my own things to take care of. To me, he was just a normal guy that lived in Praia da Luz with his mum. Um...What harm can he do to somebody? At that time, I was 22 years old. And I already had a beginning of my own business, my own computer company. I was introduced to Robert to use my services to create a property website. 
Goncalo Amaral: Sergey Malinka was, I believe, also mentioned by someone and then as we attempted to collect more information, he also had a connection with Robert Murat, so this raised suspicions. 
Sergey Malinka: A friend said that SKY news would like to interview you...
[Footage showing Malinka in 2007 talking to a reporter] I don't really know him that personally. Uh, I did some work for him as a website and we have a strictly customer relationship. 
Goncalo Amaral present day: We were in the process of investigating someone and then we hear that he went to speak to journalists. That's when we approached him. 
Sergey Malinka: They took my phone, my car keys, and they put me into a black car. When I asked them, ''Who you are, guys? What's happening?'' They said, ''We're police.'' But they never showed me any indentification. Firstly, I thought maybe some sort of speeding ticket, or maybe I parked in a handicap area, you know, something stupid and silly, or maybe I--I copied some sort of softwear I shouldn't have done or, you know, anything out of those sci-fi movies that you always watch and you never believe happens. For the first two or three hours, I was sitting in a car in Lagos. Then afterwards, I think they drove me to one of the petrol stations on the motorway and any questions that I asked were ignored. It was scary. It was like life-threatening scary. Basically, I was stripped of all the rights of making a phone call or asking any questions. They had just basically been holding me in a car. And I find out that they waited for the warrant from the judge to search my apartment. 
[Footage cuts to 2007 outside the PJ headquarters. Male reporter speaking in Portuguese] There's little information Sergy Malinka, about who this man is.What I can say at this point of the investigations is that a man in his 30s...
Sergey Malkina present day: I was trying to tell them that this is not my equiptment. This belongs to somebody else. I'm only fixing it temporarily.
[Footage cuts back to 2007 - UK male reporter speaking] The man in the yellow shirt is...
Sergey Malinka present day: I remember quite clearly when they were packing things into their car. I saw like, maybe 150-200 people sitting everywhere with the cameras. You can never be prepared for a thing like that in your life. ''What do I do? How do I act? Where do I look? Should I hide? Or should I not hide?''  When you're in a situation when you can't control and you're stripped of all the basic rights and it's just--it's worse than death, I think. 
[Footage back showing in a helicopter arial view of PDL Ocean club, then to Kate and Gerry: UK male news reporter is speaking in 2007] As ths latest episode of the inquiry unfolded, there was a reminder of it's purpose. Madeleine's mother and father out walking. This investigation is happening all around them. 
Gerry McCann 2007: And as far as we are concerned, until there is concrete evidence to the contrary, we believe that Madeleine is safe and being looked after and that is how we can continue in our efforts.  
14 days missing.
Sergey Malinka present day: Don't laugh yeah? [Shows a picture of him as a toddler in a kind of large travel cot type object] I'm like a sandwhich of pillows and nets so I wouldn't escape and open something while my parents were busy. In the year of '98 Russia had a bit of a problem, I think it was default when the dollar went sky high. [Points to another picture] There's my parents when they married. So a lot of people lost their possessions and their businesses. My parents were, unfortunately, the victims of this, so they looked for Europe for a better life. All my life when I was in Russia, I really wanted to achieve something. So my focus here in Portugal was to...You know, become a successful person.
[Cuts back to 2007 UK male reporter] Last night, police arrived, at 22-year old Sergey Malinka's flat. It's claimed he designed a website for the British man who's a suspect in the case, Robert Murat. 
Sergey Malinka present day: The news were releasing all sorts of wonderful things and untruthful statements and, you know, it was just crazy. I've been called a paedophile, I've been called a sexual predator, I've been called the Russian mafia, a human trafficker. My mother was taken for questioning. That was one of the most difficult moments of all that because my mum didn't speak, or hardly spoke in Portuguese and very bad English, so I couldn't imagine what she would have gone through in that room. I saw my father, he was all pale and my mum was crying on the sofa, saying, you know, ''What's happening? Why are we being treated this way? Is it because we are Russian's?'' I said, ''No mum, It's got nothing to do with that.'' They asked me a lot of questions about Robert. That was quite strange to me that they asked a lot of questions about him, not about me. I explained them how I got involved with Robert. So there's nothing I knew, any secrets or any--sort of, his personal life. There's nothing I could have told them. The more tired I got in that room, the more aggressive and pushy the questions were from the police, from the officers. Eventually, things got a bit ugly and he said, ''I will put this little girl on your back.'' or something and he slapped me on my back with his palm while saying that. The last detective who walked in was Mr. Amaral. He looked like he was out of breath or something and I was sitting on the chair so he said, ''On your feet.'' He kicked the chair. They asked me. ''Do you know anything about this phone call that Robert made to you at Midnight?'' I think it was 23:30. And I said no, because I never recall this phone call. 
Jon Clarke: The police had reasonably good suspicions that there was some...Something strange, some collusion happening at 11:30 or 11:40 the night that Maddie went missing. 
Robert Murat: The police basically, Um, were...[Stammers]...Looking that I had made a phone call to Sergey, um, and I've never denied making a phone call to Sergey. I just cannot remember it. There was no...No chat between two people. I don't know if it was a pocket dial or not, which it could well have been. Um...I may have rang, I don't know. I honestly have no recollection of that call. 
Jon Clarke: The fact that these phone calls were made late at night to me was very suspicious. 
Sergey Malinka: It was, I think, a few hours that we'd been going through the same thing with different inspectors. So I think each one of them had their own conclusions, so to speak, when they didn't get anything out of me. In the end they just said, ''That's it and you're free to go.'' 
[Footage cuts to 2007, a male reporter speaking in Portuguese] The Correio da Mahna newspaper reports that the computers apprehended from Sergey Malkina had their hard drives erased. 
Present day interviewer asks Sergey Malinka: The material they consficated, they took computers and 27 CD-ROMs.  And, now, there were allegations made about what was on those CD-ROMs. And I wonder if you're able to talk about that.
Sergey Malinka: No. I'd rather not. 
Interviewer: Okay. 'Cause I think...I think...What I think is there's an opportunity to go--
Sergey Malinka: Yeah, but there's no way I can prove because they confiscated not just my hard drive, it was a lot of CD's from the clients and from...Uh...Uh...And the things--They say they find pornography there. Show me one computer in the world that doesn't have some sort of cookie or something from a porn site. Um, I'm not saying I didn't have it or I did have it. What I'm saying is they should have defined which computer had it and which didn't because it's just a statement, ''There was something there.'' 
[Footage cuts to Gerry and Kate McCann PDL Ocean club press conference] Gerry McCann: In general terms, in terms of suspects, and I know there's been a lot of media response to that. I would say, as a family and I hope that everyone else here treats all suspects the way that we would hope to be treated and that they are pressumed innocent until someone is charged, arrested, and convicted of any criminal offence. 
[Male reporter muffled voice says ''Thank you.''] 
[Gerry Nods and he says ''Thank you.''] then they turn to walk away. 

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Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann' Empty Re: Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann'

Post by Jill Havern 16.04.19 11:14

NETFLIX TRANSCRIPT EPISODE 3:


The disappearance of Madeleine McCann.
Jim Gamble: My career actually began in the army. I was in the military police. came out, went into the police in Ireland, rose through the ranks to become head of Special branch Counter Terrorism in Belfast...And then moved to England and became Deputy Director General of the National Crime Squad. I'd been  the opportunity to build this new Child Exploitation & Online protection Center and I, you know, thought, ''Well is that a step backwards? Is that something that is, you know, less significant than the work that I've done?'' My own ego was preventing me from taking this step into child protection. You know, you talk about the road to Damascus. I was sent to speak at a conference in Cambodia and they took me to a dump called Stung Meanchey. Trucks came in every five or ten minutes and they dumped rubbish across the place, all sorts of noxious substance. And some families and very small children rummaged through, uh, that garbage every day. And in that environment, traveling sex offenders would visit and they would rent those children, they would take them to a hotel, bathe them, abuse them, and then dump them back in the street again, I met a young child, Traaynoi. The charity that had taken me out there recovered her back to their facility, a tiny little child who was simply being used as a commodity uh, by people because of her vulnerability that existed all around her. And she later passed from a...From a serious blood disease. And it was a humbling experience for me. And as I sat on the plane on the way back, I came across an anonymous piece of poetry. and it said...I can't actually get this out, usually.  ''I spent an hour with Laughter we chatted all the way, but I barely remember a single thing, from what she had to say. I then spent an hour with Sorrow, And Ne'er a word said she, But O' the things I learned the day, That Sorrow walked with me.'' I thought, ''It's time to pack away your own ego, to pack away the things you think you are important because here is an opportunity to do something whereby you can make a real difference,'' 
Sandra Felgueiras: It was strange. Things didn't add up. What if the other children had the same attention? Could they be here right now? 
Episode three - Pact of silence.
Jim Gamble: This was a story that was gaining global traction. 
Footage shows the London eye and the houses of parliament.
[2007 Male reporter 1]...Reputation is linked to Madeleine's fate. They have...
[Female reporter speaking in Portuguese] 
[Male reporter 2] Madeleine's disappearance has...
Jim Gamble: The McCann's had mobilized the media. It was a discussion, you know, on breakfast TV, breakfast news. 
[Footage UK news presenters/reporters BBC 2007] Female Anchor:...She joins us from the Portuguese resort...
[Philomena McCann on ''This morning'' on ITV London footage 2007] It's every parent's worst nightmare...
Jim Gamble present day: It was a discussion across the breakfast tables. 
[Female UK Reporter 2007] Celebrities including JK Rowling, and topshop boss Philip Green have contributed to a £2.5 Million reward fund.
Jim Gamble present day: The prime minister wanted to know. 
[Footage of Gordon Brown speaking on GMTV UK 2007] . Gordon Brown -...So we can get Madeleine back...
Jim Gamble present day: The Home Secretary and others wanted to know. Everybody that was anyone wanted to be engaged, briefed, you know, and informed about what was happening. 
LISBON - PORTUGAL
Paulo Pererie Cristovao: The pressure, the biggest pressure comes from inside the police, not from the media, SKY news, or something like that. It comes from inside the police. [As footage from 2007 shows three Portuguese police officers walking outside PJ headquarters including Amaral] ''Okay, Let us solve, let's solve.  What do you need? What do you need? Come on! Come on! Come on! Bring me results for me to shine,'' 
Goncalo Amaral: We have to report to directors. Directors have to report in political terms in cases like this to ministers. There's a lot of people who know what is happening. Too many people. So there is inherent pressure. 
[Olegário De Sousa -  Chief Inspector at a press conference in 2007]...The effots of the authorities...
Goncalo Amaral present day: Then there was the other pressure that was the media circus. 
Patricia De Sousa Cipriano, Lawyer and president of Portuguese association Missing Children: The authorities, the prosecutor, the PJ, were so, so stressed with the media pressure. They were always there. They couldn't work. They had to give press conferences. [Footage shows many different bursts of press conferences with Olegário De Sousa in 2007] So much pressure, so much questions. 
[Footage showing PJ including Amaral being hounded by press in 2007] Goncalo Amaral speaking in present day: We couldn't even go out for a coffee because we were surrounded. 
[Female reporter from the UK as some PJ officers are walking down the street]...Could we ask you, do you have any suspects in the Madeleine enquiry?''  PJ officers waving them off and shaking their heads no silently. One officer says, ''No.'' 
Patricia De Sousa Cipriano present day: So much political, uh, involvement. 
[Gordon Brown speaking to the press in 2007] Every parent I know will be thinking about Maddie's family, her parents...
Goncalo Amaral present day: It was all down to political pressure. There was political pressure. 
[Reporter in Portuguese 2007] The English Ambassador arrived in Lagos...
[John Buck, English Ambassador 2007 press conference PDL]... I have been in touch with the National chief of police...
[Interview 2]...With Cabinet Ministers here in Porugal, with the Prime Minister's office...
[Interview 3]...Police family Liason officers from Leicester police have now arrived to act as a point of liason between the Portuguese police and UK police forces in case there is any way in which police in the UK can further assist. 
[Female Portuguese reporter in Portuguese] The English police are recieving a briefing...
Jim Gamble present day: ACPO, the Association of Chief Police Officers, as it was then, The National Police improvement Agency, and Leicester constabulary and the Metropolitan police, and CEOP we were all looking to see what we could do to help. From the outset the feedback that was coming in was that there were difficulties arising. 
[Cuts to 2007 news footage, Portuguese male anchor speaking in Portuguese] The National Director of the Portuguese police says that the case is far from settled.
[2007 Alipio Ribero National Police Chief Policia Judiciaria speaking to press] But he guarantees that there are new components to the investigation. 
Justine McGuinness present day: I think the attitude from the Portuguese police was, ''We can deal with this  We don't really need anybody else's help.'' Of course, if you're the parents of a missing child, your natural reaction is going to be, ''Well, why aren't you accepting help from other experts?,'' 
Rui Gustavo, Journalist, Expresso newspaper: The English media and the English people started to criticise the Portuguese media and the Portuguese police for what they were doing. 
Jim Gamble: It was almost down to, you know, ''Our police are better than your police. We're better than you at this,'' And vice versa, so there became this extremely unhealthy, extremely frustrating tit-for-tat. 
Rui Gustavo: They thought that the behaviour of Goncalo Amaral, a leader in the judicial police in the Algarve, was shameful. But he was a police officer with a bulletproof reputation. 
Goncalo Amaral: I was called a 1001 different things. Incompetent, drunk, fat...All that stuff. Police officers are people, too. They are human beings just like everyone else. 
Rui Gustavo: The Portuguese police have an aura about them. and there is a view that the PJ are one of the best forces in the world.
Jim Gamble: So all of that added to a sense of resentment. 
Goncalo Amaral: We were monitored having lunch, who we were with.  They called us every name under the sun. Insulting us, labelling us incompetent. 
Jim Gamble: Some of the Portuguese police began using phrases like the Brits, the UK authorities were behaving like a colonial power. Now, that set the political and policing context out there. 
Justine McGuinness: I had followed the case, like an awful lot of people. I'd actually been to Praia da Luz before. Funnily enough as a child. Funnily enough as a child. It's a very odd town, in a way. There's quite a lot of fairly newly developed areas. A huge number of strayed dogs too. It gives it a slightly menacing atmosphere. Coupled with the joy of people going on holiday. It's a slightly bizarre place. I was approached by, um, by a headhunter, actually. Really had, you know, quite an in-depth interview. My role was to make sure everyone knew that Madeleine McCann was missing. 
50 days missing.
[Shows 2007 footage of Kate and Gerry and press and family releasing green and yellow balloons for Madeleine...] 
Justine McGuinness present day speaking over the footage being played: We went down to the beach to highlight that Madeleine had been missing for 50 days. A highly charged emotional envronment. 
[2007 a woman holidaymaker saying on camera: It's so emotional. It's so sad. A local woman speaking in Portuguese: By the grace of God, there will be progress]
Justine McGuinness present day: The balloons were an indication of hope, really. 
[Justine speaking to the press in 2007: Kate and Gerry are...
Justine McGuinness present day: You don't want to make everything about misery the whole time. 
[2007 Female reporter 1] Fifty days since Madeleine went missing, fifty balloons, each with a photograph of the missing four-year old tied to it, released by Madeleine's parents, Kate and Gerry McCann. 
[Female reporter 2 saying to Kate] It's a difficult day to you? 
Kate McCann: Every day is difficult, yeah. 
Justine McGuinness present day: The story of Madeleine McCann's disappearance had ballooned into an absolutely gigantic news story across the world. 
[2007 Crowd clapping as they countdown for the balloons to be released in a school in the UK...four, three, two, one...] 
Justine McGuinness present day: Kate and Gerry were very attractive from a news editors point of view. 
Robbyn Swan: Kate had been born in Liverpool um, Gerry in Glasgow, Catholic backgrounds. Both had worked their way up from pretty humble beginnings, um, into medical school. Kate had specialized in anesthetics and moved into becomming a GP. Gerry had moved through sports medicine into cardiac work. 
Justine McGuinness: Kate and Gerry, in my view, were very much the symbol of aspirational Britain at the time. 
[2007 Shrine of Fatima, Portugal] Kate and Gerry being filmed going to meet the Pope. 
Phil Hall PR consultant and former newspaper editor, present day: The sheer weight of the pressure on them was overwhelming them. There were just so many media from all around the world now, making it impossible for them to move. There was nothing they could do without being followed and reported upon. It was impossible now to say, ''We're gonna put a lid on it.'' The story was running and it was to try and keep it as accurate as possible. 
Justine McGuinness: It wasn't just a case of reacting to what was in the press that day. There was quite a lot of planning. 
[2007 Security at the shrine talking to press] [Security man...Which camera is...?] [Reporter This one... -No not him... - SKY] [Security man...-SKY?] [Reporter...-Okay] 
Susan Hubbard present day: At the time, they didn't talk about the struggle. They just kept moving. They just kept going forward. 
Justine McGuinness: One of the things I used to say to them regularly was, ''You have a plan. Keep your focus.'' 
Ernie Allen: My impression was that Gerry McCann was a devastated father and as a result, he had talked to lots of people and I was one of the people he called. One of the things I said is the attention span of the public is really short. Todays crisis on the front of the local newspaper is replaced by another one tomorrow. So you need to fight for Madeleine. You need to make sure the world doesn't forget that your daughter's out there. 
Justine McGuinness: We treated it as...As you would a political campaign, actually. 
[Male reporter in 2007] A short time ago, Kate and Gerry boarded a private jet, provided to them by Sir Philip Green, the boss of Topshop, minimising their time away from the twins. 
Phil Hall present day: As a parent, you fight tooth and nail for your children. You'd do anything for them. And to sit there and do nothing and just follow the police advice, say nothing, do nothing, I think that's impossible. They want to do anything they think will help the child. 
[Gerry McCann speaking at a conference in Amsterdam 2007] It's not a tour. We're having a series of very brief visits.
[Woman - There are a certain number of people who do find this whole roadshow slightly abhorrent.] 
[Kate and Gerry in Madrid, Spain] Gerry McCann: We are here to ask the Spanish public for help. I don't want to spend time, you know, talking about press conferences. I want to spend time talking about the investigation, really. 
Justine McGuinness present day: They weren't interested in becoming celebrities themselves. They were interested in finding their daughter. There's quite a big difference there. 
[Kate and Gerry McCann 2007 in Rabat, Morocco, lots of children holding up Madeleine flyers cheering ''Madeleine! Madeleine!''  Gerry McCann: I think everyone's seen today the support that Moroccan people are giving Kate and I...That if they see Madeleine...Or someone who looks very much like Madeleine...
[2007 St Peter's square. Vatican city] 
Susan Hubbard speaking present day: They wanted to see the Pope. She felt like the Pope could add power to the prayers of finding Madeleine.
[Footage 2007 shows Kate and Gerry McCann kissing the Pope's hand and him blessing Madeleine's Picture] 
[Male Reporter: What do you think of what they're doing?  Is it time to stop what's been called the ''roadshow?'' It is not a word that they like.]
Justine McGuinness present day: You could tell that there was a certain level of...Hostility. 
[2007 press conference , Berlin, Germany. Kate and Gerry sit with Clarence Mitchell at their side. Female reporter: How do you deal with the fact that more and more people seem to be pointing the finger at you, saying the way you behave is not the way people would normally behave if their child is abducted? And they seem to imply you had something to do with it. Gerry McCann Stammers...Kate McCann: To be quite...To be...To be honest, I don't actually think that is the case. I think that is a very small minority of people that is criticising us. Um...- You know...The facts are out there. We were dining very close to the children and we were checking on them very, very regularly. Um, you know, we are very responsible parents and we love our children so much and I think it's only a very few people that are actually, um...[Deep breaths] Criticising us. Gerry McCann: I have never heard before that anyone considers us suspects in this and, um, the Portuguese police certainly don't and without going into too much detail, uh, about the circumstances, we were with a large group of people, um, and, you know, there is absolutely no way Kate and I are involved in this abduction. 
[Video footage cuts to Praia da Luz sea and beach full of holidaymakers [Male reporter] Luz itself is now crammed with thousands of holidaymakers, but it is still one little girl that dominates here. Every twist and turn in this case is followed by the Portuguese media, but the tone is different to the UK, more critical, more speculative as the weeks move on. [Local male speaking: I think this case get's so important, so big, just one girl and lot's of people, lots of kids kidnapped] 
Patricia De Sousa Cipriano present day: Right now, in this moment, you have 1,667 missing children cases. Okay? 
Sandra Felgueiras: This was the beginning of the mixed feelings. If it was with a Portuguese couple, uh, a normal Portuguese couple, they wouldn't have that help. They wouldn't have that influence that the McCann's had. 
[Footage of the huge Madeleine inflatable poster on the PDL beach. Gery shaking a photographers hand smiling. Gerry McCann: It's hard work]
Goncalo Amaral present day: There is a philosopher, Ortega y Gasset, who said, ''When the heart rules the head, passion takes over reason.'' These cases with children and helpless people are always cases which appeal to our emotions are always cases that appeal to our emotions and make it harder to keep that control.
[2007 Male anchor speaking Portuguese in a news studio. The judicial police is investigating the strange disappearance of a 11-year-old boy in Lousada. Rui Pedro disappeared yesterday without a trace...
Sandra Felgueiras present day: The Portuguse start feeling, ''Oh look, we have a missed boy, Rui Pedro, and nobody did this. Nobody came to the streets making live reports every day.'' 
[2007 Male reporter in Portuguese: The family of Rui Pedro still believe that he is alive. At the scene of the disappearance, there is only the bicycle of Rui Pedro. There are no other leads. Rui Pedro female speaking on camera in Portuguese: We don't know what happened to Rui Pedro. 
Homayra Sellier president of Innoconce in danger, present day: Rui Pedro's mother wants to see if she can find her son. After the bust that was back then considered as the biggest cyber pedo-criminal network, which was called the Wonderland club. 
[Female reporter: Wonderland, an extensive and sophisticated club of paedophiles, with it's own committee, rules and vetting proceedures. Over 1,000 police and child protection officers in 13 countries simultaneously raided 105 Wonderland members. We had 750,000 members, that's three quarters of a million,  different images of paedophilia]
Homayra Sellier present day: After the Wonderland bust, there were CD-ROMs, and films which were actually scenes of rape, but from those CD-ROMs were extracted pictures of children. The only places where the parents can come and see the photos is Geneva. Not the CD-ROM, not the photos. And amongst those parents is Rui Pedros mother. And she would like to have access to the seized material. Maybe her child would be amongst those faces. I felt very, very, sad for her, because Rui Pedro was actually amongst those children who's photo was identified on Wonderland ring. I'm sorry to say this, but for me, she was already...A more than broken woman. She was...She was like a ghost. That visit was not helpful. She came with a lot of hope in her heart, but she went back with empty hands. Rui Pedro is amongst the children who were identified, but the child wasn't there phsyically. He's still missing. 
Patricia De Sousa Cipriano: The way the Madeleine McCann case was conducted, uh, by the authorities in Portugual and the authorities in Britain...Was so different from the other cases, in terms of resources, in terms of funding...Uh, in terms of media. And I started to wonder, ''What if the other children had the same attention? Could they be here right now?'' 
Paulo Pereira Cristovao Former detective, Policia Judiciaria: I can assure you that in Portugal, the money that police spent, or the government spent, to the investigation of that eight or nine Portuguese childs is not one percent...of the money that we spent on Madeleine. Why? Why don't they invest in our children? 
[2016 Filomena Teixeira Rui Pedro's mother speaking to a reporter in Portuguese: They have everything available to them, even a helicopter, things like that. I never had that nine years ago. I didn't have it. I didn't have anything.] 
[2007 Female UK news anchor in a studio speaking: Police in Malta are investigating reports of possible sightings of Madeleine McCann after tourists claim that a girl matching the four-year-old's description...] [Male U.S reporter speaking: Bosnian newspapers are full of pictures and stories about a possible sighting of Madeleine McCann in a city of high religious significance]  [Female U.S reporter speaking: A Dutch newspaper publishes a letter claiming to know the location of her body] 
Anthony Summers present day: There were myriad reports as to what had happened to Madeleine coming from all over the planet. 
[2007 Woman police officer speaking: We think It is important that the Portuguese authorities have immediately the information about this letter so they can...]
Anthony Summers present day: Some of them clearly nonsense, but even the ones that you thought were nonsense had to be followed up. 
[2007 Male UK reporter speaks whilst footage of the police working in PDL in the area: Plainclothes officers visiting the area where it's feared Madeleine's body might be buried]
Anthony Summers present day: They were understaffed and over-stressed and just not capable of doing everything. 
[2007 Male uk reporter again: But it appears to be very difficult to establish what the exact location is that they are looking for.]  [UK female news anchor: A photograph of a young girl resembling Madeleine McCann is being analysed by British...] [Olegário De Sousa -  Chief Inspector at a press conference in 2007...Lots of information regarding couples with little childs with, uh, blonde hair and a lot of them or all of them have been checked] [Female UK reporter: Could this petrol station in Marrakesh be a crucial link in the search for Madeleine? A couple on holiday there believe they saw her with a man. Mari Olli woman witness: She had this, um, pretty face and long, blonde hair and on the side to the shoulders. Green eyes and she had a little, like, sad look in her face. She said with, Uh, an accent then, ''Can we see mummy now?'']
Mari Olli present day: A little blonde girl in that petrol station is just...Well...No, that was not a very normal thing to see. 
Ray Olli: And we got back to Spain later on that night. [2007 Male Spanish anchor in Spanish as Ray is speaking present day] I put the television on and then I said to Mari, ''There's a little girl missing.'' And Mari came in and said, ''That's the little girl I seen at the petrol station.'' 
Mari Olli: It was so strange, what I saw, and when I saw the picture, it just hit me. 
Ray Olli: You try to ring the Spanish police and they didn't seem to want to know or understand. Then you tried to ring the Portuguese police and they didn't seem to want to know. 
Mari Olli: Nobody was interested. 
[UK female reporter 2007: The petrol station is one of the few places in Marrakesh with CCTV, but with no reason to keep the tapes, they were recorded over]
Ray Olli present day: If we'd have known a little girl was missing, then we could have probably done something about it. We didn't know the thing in her eye. By looking at her you could have said, ''Yes it's her,'' or ''No, it's not her.'' But we didn't know and I think that is the most upsetting part about it, that we had a very close encounter, one would say, but we didn't know. 
Ernie Allen: Law enforcement has to ask for help. These cases are huge and the typical law enforcement agency doesn't work cases like this very often. I mean, maybe never. 
Justine McGuinness: In Britain, we had the most amazing organisation called CEOP. Gerry and I had been to see the person who led CEOP at the time, a gentleman called Jim Gamble who did absolutely amazing work. They used counter-terrorism methods to enable them to find children that were being exploited and their work was just...Unbelievably thorough. 
Jim Gamble: I recieved a call from Leicester police to say that Gerry McCann would like to visit CEOP. So I went back to say, ''Well, I'd be happy,'' But I wanted reassurance that he was not a suspect. and I was given a categoric reassurance, and he visited CEOP. And I have to say the first time I met Gerry McCann in person, Um...[Clicks tongue] I think it's harsh to say, but I probably didn't really like him. 
[2007 footage, Gerry McCann outside of CEOP building holding facewards a missing child with Madeleine's picture poster. Reporter: Mr McCann, how're you doing? Gerry McCann:-Yeah, good thank you.]
Jim Gamble present day: So, it wasn't a warm welcome. I've met many survivors if abuse and their families and there is a feeling of empathy, there's a feeling of warmth, but Gerry was very cold, and very controlled. 
Goncalo Amaral: Gerry seems like a very controlling person. He's someone that knows how to dominate others very well and maintain his pose. 
[2007 Interview Gerry McCann: What you have to remember are...There is a huge amount of work going on in the background.]
Goncalo Amaral present day: He's a surgeon, so, it's not easy to catch him off balance. 
Margarida Davim Journalist, co-author of ''Pact of silence'': I haven't read this article in ten years  [Laughs] Reading it again, it's interesting. because by printing this, um, it became, um, a change in the whole story that was being told by media. The article is called ''Pact of silence'' And it was printed on the 3rd of June, 2007. 
[Male Portuguese news anchor 2007 speaking in Portuguese. Tonights guest on Edicao das Dez is Journalist Felicia Cabrita...]
Margarida Davim Journalist present day: The most famous journalist back then in our team was Felicia Cabrita. Because of the work she had done on Casa Pia, a paedophile case that really stirred up a lot in the media and politics in Portugal. 
Felicia Cabrita: Casa Pia is a state owned institution that provides children with poor backgrounds with shelter and education. Therefore, they are responsible for taking proper care of those children. What we found was that, instead of being cared for, of being nurtured and raised in a supportive environment, there was this scheme, since as early as the '60s, where American millionaires with private jets would travel to Portugal, obviously with the connivance of higher-ups in the Casa Pia Hierarchy, and would do whatever they wanted with those kids. 
Margarida Davim: So it was a story that really shocked the public in Portual, and paedophile became a subject. 
Felicia Cabrita reading from the ''Pact of silence'' article: ''It's been a month since Madeleine McCann...Vanished without a trace. A few kilometers from Lagos, in the Ocean Club resort in Praia da Luz, the faint illumination further denifies the amience. At the reception which leads to the tapas restaurant, there is nobody. Getting inside is easy.'' I only started investigating this case about three weeks after the press started covering the story. I found it very strange. The police in Portugal in regards to this case were not focusing on the family, but only on the actual kidnapping and we know that in most cases, the culprit is someone who is close to the child. 
[2007 Reporter in Portuguese: One month, without Madeleine, but her parents retain an unshakeable faith that she will be found. Sunday mass is part of the McCann's routine. Devoted catholics, they have been given the key to the chapel so they can pray in peace.
Felicia Cabrita present day: And while the mass was happening and everyone was focusing on it, I decided to go and eat at the Ocean Club. Maybe because I am know In Portugal, the staff let me stay and choose the table I would like to sit in, and I chose the exact same table that the McCan's used to have dinner at. 
Goncalo Amaral: They always had dinner at the same time at that table, which was always reserved. 
Felicia Cabrita: And this is where I find, the first contradiction in relation to the parent's statement. 
[Gerry McCann speaking in an interview 2007: But, you know, you've seen the proximity of the restaurant. There was a line of sight to the apartment and it was not dissimilar to dining in your garden]
Goncalo Amaral present day: The table, despite what they say, sits far from the apartment and has limited visability to it because when they dined there, there was plastic behind them that wasn't very transparent as to allow them to see the back of their apartment block. 
Felicia Cabrita: From the position I was in, it was completely impossible to see the apartment or room where they had left the children to sleep. As an investigative journalist I have to ask ''Why?'' Why would you lie about such a simple thing? 
Robbyn Swan: Joining the McCann's on the holiday were a group of friends, um, David and Fiona Payne, Matt Oldfield and his wife Rachael, along with Russ O'Brien and his partner Jane Tanner, and the mother of Fiona Payne, a lady by the name of Dianne Webster. Six of the group were doctors and between them they had eight small children several of them toddlers. 
Margarida Davim: We had a feeling there was something wrong with the timeline. 
Robbyn Swan: The parent's all decided that every 20 minutes or half an hour, they would get up and one or the other of them would go and check on their own children. 
Anthony Summers: And sometimes they would also check on the children of one of their friends or one of the children of their friends.
Margarida Davim: Some of them said that they were going to see the children through a window. Others were saying that the adults would come in the room to see how the children were doing. 
Felcia Cabrita: The parents versions in terms of timing don't match. Their version is chaotic and didn't match with employee's, who were working and served them in the hotel version. If they kept the time they said they were at dinner and were leaving to see the kids, we would be in an opera by Stravinsky. One would sit, the other would leave. It would have been hysterical.  
Paulo Pereira Cristovao: You say that you used to go there every 20 minutes, but he said he goes there every half an hour and she said every hour. 
Goncalo Amaral: It seemed that no one was at the table and were all off to the apartment. What is emphasised is that they say there was a security system in which everyone was looking after everyone else, but that's not quite how it happened. As is normal on holiday people are very relaxed, they drank a lot of alcohol and sometime they would walk home to pee. 
Robbyn Swan: One is accepting the word of the McCann's and their friends for this timeline, and that they sat down together and wrote out their timeline and then 24 hours later, they revised their timeline. And worked it out again.
Goncalo Amaral: The childs father said, in his first statement he said, he got in through the front door. He contradicted himself in a subsequent statement and in his second statement he admitted to having entered through the back door which, he usually left open. That's a major differnce. 
Felicia Cabrita: The McCann's do not stand up to investigation. 
Goncalo Amaral: The child's mother said that, ''When I went to look for my child, I peeped under the bed and I didn't see her.'' She couldn't have peeped; The matress went all the way to the floor. 
Felicia Cabrita: There are questions in the air. Why leave the children alone? Why did they not use the babysitting service the hotel provided? They didn't use it. You see a man who emotionally supports someone and is suddenly transformed into a suspect. 
68 Days missing...
[Reporter 2007: The only official suspect in the investigation into the abduction of Madeleine McCann is being question again today by police in Portugal.]
Robert Murat present day: There was what you call a confrontation took part...Took place in a very small office in the PJ building, um, and they were with three of the McCann group. [Footage shows Rachael Mamphilly Oldfield, Russell O'Brien and Fiona Payne going into the PJ building in 2007 on the day Robert is describing] 
Goncalo Amaral: There were statements which said that Robert  Murat had been near the apartment on the night and they spoke of Robert Murat as though he could had been involved in the disappearance. 
Robert Murat: So a little--A tiny little room with a little desk and a couple of police officers in there and, um, they went through each of them, um, and asked them their view and versions of this, and uh, each one one of them basically said they'd seen me there that night. And I--I again, basically said that that was not true. And then towards the end of that interview, Um, One of those members of the group basically came out and said, ''I know it was him, I recognise his eye.'' Which...I am blind in one eye. I have a detached retina, but it's...As you may see, it is slightly recognisable. It's not recognisable in the dark. The fact is, that people who do know me, were there that night. The police were there that night. And...None of them saw me. The only person who saw me was these three people. And that for me is strange in itself. Um, do I believe they were confused? No. I think they, whatever their intention was...Um...Had the intention of saying what they said. 
Felicia Cabrita: None of it makes sense. 
Margarida Davim: It was strange and things didn't add up. I remember that only one of the friends, Jane, said she saw a man. 
Goncalo Amaral: Just like we say in Portugal, the wine from Porto get's better with time, that statement got better with time. There were more and more details in Jane Tanner's statement. So much so, it lost credibility, because she kept on adding so many details, even saying that she knew the person, describing what the baby was wearing, describing what the kidnapper was wearing. 
Margarida Davim: The word that we ended up using as a title, ''Pact.'' came from David Payne when he said that they had agreed with Gerry not to talk about what happened. 
Goncalo Amaral: That's why a police reconstruction was needed to work to uncover the factual truth of the matter. 
Sandra Felguerias: The truth is, they are the keys for the untold story that is, what happened on the hours before her disappearance. 
Kelvin Mackenzie: What is anybody scared about that the dinner guests can say which is not going to totally back up the story of what happened that night? And I don't understand why...[Stammers] Do the dinner guests want to just forget what happened? Have they been asked by the McCann's not to say anything? Has somebody else asked them? 
Robbyn Swan: ''There must be.'' people thought you know, ''Where there is smoke, there is fire. They must be hiding something.'' 
Kelvin Mackenzie: How do they view what happened that night? After all, it will cast a shadow over them. 
Goncalo Amaral: The act of abandoning their children, leaving them alone for such a long time, was not unique to the child's parent's. Every one of their friends did it. So there seems to be an alliance between everyone to protect someone. 
[2007 Male reporter: So little information and so much media coverage, speculation pours in. And this week, unattributed sources said the McCann's and their friend's were coming under scrutany] Justine McGuinness getting out of a car addressing press 2007. ''This is actually a private road.
Justine McGuinness present day: I noticed that there was--A shift going on in terms of, you know, how the McCann's were regarded. Journalists were working in a vacum when it came to facts. 
[Footage cuts back to Justine saying to press as she is shutting a gate to a house: Look, come on boys, just belt up. [Female reporter to Justine: You know, we are doing our job, you know] 
Justine McGuinness present day: And there was hostility from the Portuguese police. 
[2007 female Portuguese reporter: The judicial police's initial theory pointed towards Madeleine's kidnapping. Now there is less and less interest in that line of enquiry]
[Male reporter in Portugese 2007: The Portuguese and British authorities have intercepted phone calls and emails from the McCann's and their inner circle] 
Ernie Allen present day: It is far more likely that a parent or family member is responsible in these situations than a random stranger. So law enforcements obviously should, interview the parents, Uh, should in many cases polygraph the parents, should talk to those close to the child, close to the family and rule that out. 
[Male reporter 2007 showing on a computer Missing Madeleine website: This is the official website dedicated to finding Madeleine McCann. Her father Gerry writes a daily blog, or diary, and the latest entry is remarkable for it's emotional tone from a man who, just recently, had seemed so composed in public at least.]
[Female reporter in Portuguese: Gerry McCann finishes by addressing the kidnapper or killer directly. ''If you've done something you regret, it's not too late to do the right thing.'']
Jim Gamble present day: When Gerry talked about the possibility of writing an appeal, I helped construct a letter by just providing some advice about what I think you would say. You know, I'd do it along the lines of some people, you know, make mistakes, terrible mistakes in life that they never intended, but that ultimately it's never too late to do the right thing. But in shaping that, I was actually talking to Gerry. I think it was the only way of delivering that message or reflecting that thought. If it's something that happened, if it was a mistake, You know, it's never too late just to come out and stop all of this.
[Female reporter 2007: Portuguese police say vital evidence may have been destroyed in the case of Madeleine McCann. About 20 people crammed into their hotel room after the 4-year-old went missing.]
Jim Gamble present day: If we have a break-in, we want to seal the door. We want to know that scene is at it was or as close as possible to the time the crime took place. So that you can then reflect on that, um...Under the microscop so to speak, as the investigation moves forward. 
Fransico Courte Real, professor, National institute of forensic medicine:  Of course it was a difficult case. We are talking about an apartment used by tourists. So it is natural that there are other guests coming and going into the apartment and natural that hotel maids go into the apartment. So there's always a lot of people, naturally, who may have left biological traces. 
Sandra Felguerias: The criminal police arrived to the crime scene four hours after she vanished. The flat was full of people. 
Robbyn Swan: What they were interested in was finding the child so they immediately began joining in the search. They did nothing to seal off the apartment and people came and went. 
Goncalo Amaral: A father who just lost his child--Will he think, ''I can't let anyone in?'' I think we cannot demand that from them. 
Sandra Felguerias: If I am a mum, I want to recover, um, my daughter. I know this is a crime scene. I don't let anyone go in there. The first thing that rational and intelligent people do, and they are, is to preserve the crime scene, is to help the authorities...To find, what happened. They didn't do that.
[Male reporter 2007 in English: When Kate McCann went to check between 9:45 and 10pm, she found the shutter of the window on the ground floor apartment was open and Madeleine was gone]
Anthony Summers present day: I mean the shutters business is--Is, is, there's conflict about the shutters. According to Kate McCann, when she went into the children's room and realised that Madeleine didn't appear to be there, she looked around, and one thing in particular struck terror into her. The window was wide open and the shutters on the outside were raised all the way up. 
Goncalo Amaral: The first issue is whether they opened from the outside. If someone came through could could you open them from the outside? 
Robbyn Swan: But she screams, and everybody comes running, et cetera, sprinted back to the apartment...And then the childrens room, Gerry lowered the shutter at the open window. 
Goncalo Amaral: Fiona Payne's mother, one of the first things she does is try to open the blinds, but is unable to do so. 
Anthony Summers: The police reported that the shutters had been almost closed by the time the police got there. 
Goncalo Amaral: When the police arrived, nothing was as the childs mother described, which was the window had been wide open. the blind's completely lifted, wind coming in with a clear means of escape. That state of affairs was not seen or reported by anyone else, which raised some suspicion. Whether the window was open or closed is only relevent to the couples hypothesis. The other issue is that in the forensic inspection in which fingerprints were collected by our colleagues who were on duty that first night, the only fingerprint they find on the window--On the glass on the inside--It's a palm of the right hand of the mother of the child, tilted so as to open the window. Not to close it, to open it. That's the only fingerprint there. There's no gloves imprint, only that fingerprint. That's when we start thinking about the parent's as suspects because that's a staging of a crime. It's staged.
Martin Grime forenic dog trainer and handler:  When the dog indicates in the field, it will either be human decomposition or human blood. Human decoposition is very persistent, very pungent to the point where we've been able to locate, in blind searches, graves 40 years after the body has been removed and the body was only there for a short period of time. With blood the crime scene investigators have been to the house and somebody has cleaned the blood up to the point where nobody can see it. That doesn't mean there isn't any there to find. With floorboards, some blood might drip through the gap and, um...Run around the back of the floorboard, which won't be able to be seen but it'll still be there. The odour will still be coming through the gap in the floorboards and the dog will pick it up and respond to it. The FBI invited me over to America and we assisted with the development of their canine program and they were quite, um, sceptical about the blood dog at the time, and they got 12 identical pieces of cloth, they put a tiny spot of blood in the center of one of the cloths, they washed it three times I think, and they put it in a line-out for me when I got there and said, ''Tell us which one it is.'' Keela went up the line and not only identified the right cloth, but the exact spot where the blood had been.
89 Days missing...
Robbyn Swan: Goncalo Amaral at that point in the summer, chose to do something that had been suggested long since by the British police. He took them up on an offer of more expert help in their search efforts. 
Goncalo Amaral: You have to be an experienced person and have a logical mindset which allows you to make a hypotheses and follow specific line of investigation, knowing that this direction might be a dead end and that you might have to turn back and then go in a different direction. 
Justine McGuinness: The dogs coming over wasn't regarded as in any way negative. 
[Sandra Felguerias in 2007 in Portuguese: These British dogs are unique in the world. They are the only ones capable of sniffing the first odours emitted by the cadaver when the body ceases to function.]
Sandra Felguerias present day: He had two dogs, one was sniffing cadavers and the other blood. 
Justine McGuinness: The more experts you have working on a case, surely the better it is for everybody. 
Goncalo Amaral: Gerry McCann, he was scared of the dogs coming. 
Justine McGuinness: And then, of course, there was a surprise.
[Robbyn Swan speaks as Video footage is shown in 2007 of Martin Grime and the dogs inspection. Apartment 5a]
Robbyn Swan: On the first day of the searches involving Eddie and Keela, they were taken to apartment 5a. First, Eddie, the dog trained to scent human cadaverine, the scent of a corpse, was brought into the apartment. Eddie's behaviour changed the moment he came through the door of the apartment. He became tense and aware. 
Martin Grime: He would work very well in large area searches and his response to finding was to bark. [2007 Dog searches footage shows Eddie jump on the sofa in the apartment sniffing around]
Robbyn Swan: The dog handler, Martin Grime, said Eddie didn't alert in any other situation except when he scented that which he was seeking, the scent of human cadaver. 
[Video footage 2007 of Eddie sniffing around the wardrobe of the McCann's bedroom in 5a. Eddie marks cadaver in the corner of the wardrobe]
Sandra Felguerias present day: I didn't know which details the McCann's took off and why they took off those details. I was 100 per cent sure that they didn't share the whole information they had. Something very different from what they've told the whole world happened. 
[Back to 2007 footage, Eddie barks a hit behind the sofa in apartment 5a under the window]

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Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann' Empty Re: Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann'

Post by Jill Havern 16.04.19 11:15

NETFLIX TRANSCRIPT EPISODE 4:


The disappearance of Madeleine McCann
31st of July 2007 - Opens to the sound of Eddie Martin Grime's cadaver dog, barking as they're inspecting apartment 5a, Praia da Luz, Portugal. 
[Martin Grime speaking in the video footage, 2007, explaining the process as it's happening. The only two places where he picked up enough scent to give me a bark alert are in this bedroom in this corner where he was barking [Martin points at the wardrobe] Moving on to the other room, he's decided, ''Yes, that's what I'm looking for,'' and that's where he's given me the bark indication. What we should understand with this one is that he only barks...]
Robbyn Swan present day: After Eddie's work was done, Grime brought in Keela the blood dog. 
Martin Grime: Keela was trained to see if we could train a dog that would locate human blood. Without responding to human decomposition or animal blood. 
Robbyn Swan: She too went around the apartment not particularly interested. Until she got to that sofa area. 
[Martin Grime 2007 as the footage is being shown of Keela sniffing around the area where Eddie marked. ''She's trained to follow my finger and conduct sniff tests. So, wherever my finger goes, her nose will follow. Keela's response to finding something is to point. She'll stop with her nose as close to it as she can possibly can without touching it.'' Keela marks the same place behind the sofa as Eddie]
Justine McGuinness: If you go out there and you put yourself up, you've got to expect at some point that there will be a backlash. 
The Disappearance Of Madeleine McCann
Episode 4 - Heaven and Earth
Jim Gamble: I suspected the parents from the very outset because at the end of the day, statiscally, it's likely to be the parents or someone who is in close proximity with the child. 
[Reporter 1: The search for Madeleine McCann has taken a frightening turn right back to the vacation home in Portugal where she was last seen]
[Reporter 2: Some very wild questions, unattributed, are out there being discussed openly]
[News anchor: Forensic experts in Britain will study suspected traces of blood found in the apartment in the Algarve where Madeleine McCann was last seen three months ago]
Goncalo Amaral: I've always been sceptical about using the dogs. Martin knows successful cases. They are never cases where the dogs solve the investigation or the case. They are cases like this one, where the dogs help the police with their work. 
Robbyn Summers: On the third day of their work in Praia da Luz, the two specialist dogs were taken to the villa where the McCann's had been staying since Madeleine Disappeared. 
Justine McGuinness: The police gave notice that they were going to search the villa and everybody needed to be out. I think I had mixed feelings at the time. At least it was a step forward in terms of the investigation. 
Robbyn Swan: Neither dog immediately alerted to anything, except...Eddie, the cadaver dog, alerted to Madeleine's toy, cuddle cat. 
Goncalo Amaral: I thought that he child doll may have come in contact with a dead body. There was someon always going around with that doll and that person was the child's mother. As such, it can indicate that the mother... [Footage cuts to 2007 Kate McCann and Gerry outside the church in PDL, Kate wearing the trousers where there was a cadaver hit and holding cuddle cat. Kate McCann saying...''Gratidude and thanks for everybody...''] May have been in contact with her daughters corpse. Simply that.
[A police spokesman has told the BBC there are now indications the toddler was not abducted. [Olegário De Sousa -  Chief Inspector at a press conference in 2007]...The child could be dead...]
Sandra Felguerias present day: When the PJ let the information come out that they were investigating the possibility, that Madeleine being dead, and the McCann's being implicated in her murder, they didn't say this exactly by these words. They said that only, ''We investigate the possibility of her being dead.'' 
[Reporter 2007: In the capital, Lisbon, I spoke to the Chief Inspector, acting as an official spokesman to the enquiry. Olegário De Sousa: Clues have been found that could point in a possible, uh, death of the little child...]
Sandra Felguerias present day: And the thing is the same because the only people that they were investigating behind this possibility was the McCann's. 
[Male reporter 2007: There is a different feel, to this inquiry and to the coverage, much more speculation surrounding the McCann's and the fate of their daughter]
90 days missing...
Robbyn Swan: Meanwhile, the Portuguese police asked Grime and his team to search cars that had been used both by the McCann's and their friends and by others involved in the case. 
[Reporter 2007: We think about ten cars were searched, two from the Robert Murat family, others from family and friends and we know that one of them was the hire car that's being used by Gerry and Kate McCann]
Robbyn Swan present day: Martin Grime wrote in his report, um, that he, at the time, had no idea which car belonged to which individual. He first deployed the cadaver dog, Eddie. [As Robbyn speaks footage is shown in the car park, it shows the McCann's car and a flyer on the window as he walks past...Then carries on showing footage of Eddie sniffing the cars] Searching car by car, Eddie gave no alert. [Footage shows Eddie doesn't hit on Malinka or Murat's cars at all.]
Martin Grime present day: Odour lingers and it migrates and transfers. To the dog, that item may still be present. 
[2007 Footage of the cars in the carpark inspection, Eddie reaches the McCann's car. Eddie hits, barking loudly, on the driver side of the car]
Robbyn Swan present day: But then in front of a silver Renault, he alerted to something on the driver's side door. Keela, the blood scenting dog, too, alerted at the silver Renault. She also alerted to something in the boot of the car on the right side. 
Sandra Felguerias: At that moment, the country, and I would risk saying the world, was in shock. I think the feeling here was, they lied to us, they were lying to all the world. That was the turning point. 
Rui Gustavo Journalist Expresso newspaper: The case became really strange when the dogs detected the blood in the room.
[Female reporter 2007: But if the blood really is from Madeleine, how can you explain it? Gerry McCann: Well, we don't know...Kate McCann cut's in: At the moment, it's all speculation]
Rui Gustavo present day: Also the smell of the corpse in the car that the parent's used later on. That can't be explained. 
Robbyn Swan: Martin Grime had 30 years experience working with police dogs at that point, and Grime attested at the time that they wouldn't misfire. They wouldn't inadvertently pick up animal blood for human blood or midetect the smell of rotting food for that of a corpse or cadaver. The police took away boxes upon boxes of the McCann's belongings. They took the boxes to another location where they then deployed the dogs again. This time, the cadaver dog Eddie reacted to some clothing that was in one of the boxes. 
Goncalo Amaral: It was mainly clothes from the child's mother. They were the objects where they detected corpse odours. Some trousers, a blouse.
Robbyn Swan: This led to the Portuguese doing minute, detailed investigation and producing numerous samples from the living room of apartment 5a, near the sofa where the dogs had alerted and from the boot of the McCann's rental car. Fingernails, other substances that might be susceptible to DNA research, all of these were packed up and sent off to the Forensic Science Service in the UK for DNA analysis. 
[2007 male UK Reporter 1: The sample recovered from the McCann's apartment will be analysed over several days by Britain's Forensic Science Service]
[2007 female UK Reporter 2: If it does prove to be blood, scientists will then extract DNA to see if there's a match to Madeleine]
Justine McGuinness present day: By the time we got to the stage, the media had exploded in numbers. It was absolutely huge. 
[2007 Male UK Reporter: Every twist and turn in this case is followed by the Portuguese media, but the tone is different to the UK, more critical, more speculative as the weeks move on]
Justine McGuinness present day: My colleague David Hughes, came out to Portugual and helped me because you can't physically even answer the phone at the rate that the phone calls were coming in. 
David Hughes PR advisor to the McCann's: I was sitting on a London bus and my phone went and she literally rang up and said, Uh, ''How busy are you? Do you fancy coming and lending a hand?'' Simply 'cause it, you know, had become such a huge story. Virtually every newspaper, all the broadcasters were covering the story on a daily basis. 
[2007 UK news studios footage of a female anchor holding up a newspaper reading out the headline:...Just as it was on The times there, ''Maddy parents fury at Algarve slurs'' Male anchor...Allegations made against the parents...Daily mirror]
David Hughes present day: So I quite understood there'd be a sort of huge sort of workload. I remember one of the first things I was involved in was a Sunday morning religious program. That was something which they were keen on because it, A, reflected their own personal faith and secondly, thought it would mean that they would have a chance reaching perhaps audiences which, um, other convential media hadn't reached. 
[2007 On the show Heaven and Earth Kate McCann speaking: I was like--I mean, you've got that total feeling of helplessness and I was just praying straight away and there's a series of people that I rang, um, who I know have got a lot of faith and I said, ''Please, just start praying.'' And this chain kind of went off and you don't...I mean, I just didn't realise, really, how important my faith was.  Gerry McCann: And the helplessness that first night, and even...I wouldn't say I'm the most religious person in the world, but even then, I just slumped, um, and we phoned the priest that married us and this was three or four O'Clock in the morning and... Kate McCann cuts in: It was ten past two. - He's still got it on his phone. [They both Chuckle] --And-- Host: They're never off duty. Gerry McCann: Yeah, and he said, you know, ''What can I do?'' And I just said, ''Just pray.'' 
97 days Missing...
David Hughes present day: They had um, heard the firt sort of implied suggestions regarding the sniffer dogs that morning. 
[Reporter 1, 2007, in Portuguese: The parents of Madeleine McCann were at the police station this afternoon]
[Reporter 2 In Portuguese: 5pm, Kate and Gerry McCann leave Portimao's Policia Judiciaria precinct. They leave through the back entrance in a Renault Scenic, which was already inspected by the police. 
David Hughes present day: There was a tense atmosphere because it was the first point at which, you know, there'd been any suggestion of a serious nature that they could have had any negative role in the whole sort of proceedings. 
[Reporter 1 in 2007 in Portuguese: They left in a car that was inspected by the police]
Justine McGuinness present day: I think the suspicion was that the hire car had been used to um, transfer Madeleine's body. 
Susan Hubbard: When Kate came back that day and realised they were no longer believing them or that they'd started to doubt their whole story, uh, her despair was...Yeah, beyond what you'd want to hear, you know, someone...You know, crying and because her realisation  immediately was, ''They're not looking for her.'' 
Haynes Hubbard:-That's right.
Susan Hubbard: From the moment that they distrusted her, she knew they weren't looking. It was an awful time.
Haynes Hubbard: Yeah, that was pretty awful. 
Susan Hubbard: The press was at it's height then, too. 
[Female UK reporter 2007 as footage is shown of Kate and Gerry walking in the streets PDL: Exactly 100 days since Madeleine McCann disappeared, her parents Kate and Gerry have been to church this morning in Praia da Luz]
Justine McGuiness present day. The weight of media interest...I counted well over 70 photographers outside the church alone. 
Haynes Hubbard: We closed the doors for them so the press wouldn't come in.  And I remember and we actually--I remember we gave them the keys, so that they could go in and hide because it was nasty, it was extroadinarily nasty. 
Justine McGuinness: Right from the beginning, the McCann's were warned by everybody involved that you know, if you go out there, and put yourself up, you've got to expect at some point that there will be a media backlash. You know, it's like a tsunami. If the wave goes out...At some point, it's gonna come back in. With equal or increased ferocity. 
David Hughes: It was the most astonishing and an absolutely unique sort of professional experience. Such an enormous deluge of attention. One wasn't having to hunt down publictiy. One was having to manage it. 
[Male UK reporter 2007: In the beginning, they asked journalists for help. But nearly four months on, the relationship has soured]
Justine McGuinness present day: You're put on a pedestal and then the pedestal is ripped out. 
115 days missing...
[Male Uk reporter 2007: Media speculation has been rife here since the police admitted three weeks ago that Madeleine might be dead. That statement was based on new forensic evidence recovered from the families holiday apartment]
David Hughes: The approach of everyone involved was to not criticise the Portuguese police or the authorities. Everyone trying to sort of button their lips about what we really thought of their performance. 
[Interviewer to Kate and Gerry footage played in 2007: Do you still have faith in the police investigation and do you have faith that you will see Madeleine again? Kate McCann: [Tut and sigh] I think yes, and yes are the two answers to that...]
Justine McGuinness present day: But then the relationship obviously changed. 
Anthony Summers: A factor that constantly affected the case in Portugal was the Portuguese law of judicial secrecy. The police are not allowed to discuss the course of the case in any way. 
[In a TV studio in Portugal speaking in Portuguese Alipio Ribiero - National chief of police Polcia Judiciaria to others in the studio: It could be that this test is not conclusive, could bring us some lead]
Anthony Summers present day: Madeleine's parents were gagged from talking to the press about what they learned from the police.
Goncalo Amaral: If they had broken judicial secrecy, they could be sentenced to up to three years in prison. 
Jim Gamble: But it seemed as the investigation went on, that information was being leaked to the media, that lots of people suspected were coming from the Portuguese police.
Sandra Felguerias: I talked with many people inside the PJ. I felt they were giving details about something they wanted public. 
Anthony Summers: So the law was one thing. What the police were actually doing was quite another. 
[UK male reporter 2007: The media spotlight on Kate and Gerry McCann made their daughter the most high profile missing child in the world. Last week the McCann's called their lawyers when the Tal & Qual newspaper claimed the police now believed the couple killed Madeleine]
Anthony Summers present day: By late summer, there was an implication that they might have over-sedated her, um, by administrating a drug. 
[Justine McGuinness reading out a statement on behalf of the McCann's to the press in 2007: ''The past 120 days have been horrific for us, our family, and friends. We have tried to ignore some of the more ludicris speculation, but we simply could not ignore T&Q's report]
Anthony Summers present day: Another newspaper went on to suggest that in their holiday apartment that they had a syringe for injecting drugs into their children. 
Justine McGuinness: All sorts of theories were out there, like that a sort of syringe was found in the apartment. 
[Sandra Felguerias to Kate and Gerry McCann in an interview in 2007: In that evening, did you give your kids something like Calpol to help them sleep? Gerry McCann:-You know, we're not going to comment on anything, but, you know, there's absolutely no way we used any sedative drugs or anything like that and... You know, Calpol is a very common remedy used by parents all over the world...]
Anthony Summers: Calpol is a very common remedy used by parents all over the world in one form or another to help their children with fever or pain. After Madeleine had disappeared, for five or six hours, there was a great hubbub in Apartment 5A, policemen coming and going and the friends of the McCann's coming and going and much talking and wailing and worrying. And yet the twins who were still there, little babies, still slept on. Continued to doze, weren't woken. 
Paulo Pereira Cristavo: Everybody went in and out of the apartment, screams, shouting. I don't know. 
Goncalo Amaral: There were two twins asleep, about a year and a half old, sleeping close to all the commotion.
Paulo Pereira Cristavo: It's not normal, still sleeping, sleeping, sleeping during...
Goncalo Amaral: A lot of noise and they never woke up. And they left to another apartment still sleeping. Madeleine's mother spent the whole night checking on how the twins were breathing--if they were breathing or not, if they were alright. She was worried about them. So this is all very strange. 
[2007 Female Anchor speaking in Portuguese: Kate McCann's father spoke to the newspaper the Sun, and admitted there was a possibility she was given Calpol. It's a medicine used to combat fever and pain, but it's also used to help sleeping] 
Justine McGuinness present day: Obviously the Portuguese police had a theory and other people um, speculated on that theory. 
Rui Gustavo: It was immediately obvious that the parents could be considered suspects. Various Hypotheses were immediately put forward. The polices hypothesis was that it was accidental death, that the parents had hidden her body afterwards. 
[2007 Male interviewer in Spanish saying to Kate and Gerry McCann: When you heard that the police had found blood in the apartment, how did you react? Gerry McCann goes to take his mic off his top: Do you know what? [Static cackles from the mic] Gerry adds impatiently. -This is all investigation. And you need to speak to the police. People in the background: Gerry....Gerry just...Gerry McCann: You know, all your questions are about the investigation and we can't comment on it. Justine: Gerry, just...Just...Sit down. (Trying to calm the situation) Gerry McCann speaks still frustrated: We can't answer questions about the investigation. Justine: They know that. Male in English: What they want you to say is it's speculation. Justine: So that you can then say ''Stick to the official line.'' Interview cuts off]
Footage is shown a worker in a lab getting hair strands out of a plastic tiny pouch with tweezers. 
Robbyn Swan: On September the 4th, the British scientist who was doing the primary forensic work in the UK on all the samples from the floor area near the sofa and from the boot of the McCann's rental car, that Renault Scenic, sent an initial report through to Portugal. 
[2007 Female UK anchor: Police in Portugal recieved the initial results of forensic tests on material found in the apartment from where Madeleine disappeared]
Robbyn Swan present day: That report was written in English and translated into Portuguese. The Summary that the Portuguese investigator submitted to his superiors was shorn of all the caveats that had been in the original, the caution to await a final result. It was bald and it was very...Incriminating. 
Justine McGuinness: I remember one of the journalists saying to me, there was something that you wouldn't expect in a place that wasn't expected. 
[Female Portuguese anchor speaking in Portuguese in a studio: The Portuguese police has received the test results for the Madeleine McCann case]
[UK male reporter 2007: Preliminary results have now been returned to Portugal. Detectives have said today that they are happy with the results]
Anthony Summers: The police are not allowed  to discuss DNA evidence, and yet they leaked information to the press. 
Justine McGuinness: You can't pin down exactly where that information came from. I've got my own suspicions, but, you know, they're suspicions. 
[Sandra Felguerias 2007 in Portuguese to the camera: Another piece of information I have at this moment is the police have now clarified what happened to Madeleine...]
Sandra Felguerias present day: And this was information the PJ uncover sources told me. ''We found, 70,90 Marks, that were exactly...Equal to the blood of Madeleine.'' It was Madeleine. She was inside a car. 
[Sandra Felguerias 2007 To the camera in Portuguese: There was a match of 80% minimum between the DNA samples found inside the rental car that the McCann's hired 25 days after Madeleine disappeared and the childs genetic profile. Now the scientists are making progress with final data. It won't be just an 80% match but, a full match]
Goncalo Amaral present day: The traces found in the car closely matched Madeleine's DNA profile. We were given the information. We didn't dream it up. 
Robbyn Swan: Essentially, the Portuguese police's case against the McCann's involved the following: That she had died by accident on the night of 3rd of May, that the supposed checks on the children had been concocted, that they had hidden their daughters body, perhaps in a fridgerator until a later time, and that her body had thus subsequently been transported in the rental car they had rented some weeks later. 
126 Days Missing...
[UK Reporter 1 2007: Kate McCann will arrive at the police station in Portugal in an hours time with her solicitor. Her husband has also been told he will be formally interviewed tomorrow]
[UK Reporter 2 2007: Those close to the McCann's are very concerned by the increasing number of reports in the Portuguese press that seem to come from leeks in the police]
Justine McGuinness present day: It was a really lovely day summer's day. They have a very close relationship so obviously, before she went in to be interviewed, um, they had their own time together. 
[2007 Male Reporter in Portuguese: Many people, Many tourists, and, of course, many journalists followed Kate McCann to Portimao police station.] 
[UK Male reporter 2007 trying to snap Kate in a car: This is it. This is it]
Justine McGuinness present day: Kate was obviously nervous. You know that the journalists are going to follow you. 
[2007 Footage is being played of Kate's car stops outside the PJ station: Reporters yelling]
[UK Male reporter: At just before Two O'Clock, Kate McCann arrived, brought here by her husband Gerry, and accompanied through a wall of media by her sister-in-law]
[Justine says loudly to the journalists as Kate and Gerry Kiss: Can you clear a path?]
Justine McGuinness present day: It was clear to me that information had been given to different media outlets, you know, in advance of things happening. The Portuguese police wanted to make sure that the journalists were in place. 
Then this is replayed.... [UK Reporter 2 2007: Those close to the McCann's are very concerned by the increasing number of reports in the Portuguese press that seem to come from leeks in the police then it adds...-And place them at the center of this investigation]
Justine McGuinness present day: The Tsunami was coming back. 
[Justine McGuinness speaking outside the PJ station to reporters holding their mics out as she says: -I'd like to read a statement, um, on Kate's arrival at the police station in Portimao today. ''Kate and Gerry are happy to help the police in their investigations to find their daughter Madeleine.'' 
Goncalo Amaral present day: She came in with a media spokesman and her lawyer. I don't think the interrogation took more than two hours. More would have been too much.
[UK Male reporter 2007: Huw, it's eight hours since Kate McCann arrived here at the investigation headquarters and she is still in there being questioned. There was actually just a short break, but, the interview, I'm told, has resumed]
Justine McGuinness: The questioning went on for probably about 11 hours. She was very clear with me that they'd been incredibly aggressive with her. 
[UK Male reporter 2007: The interview is detailed, but yet they haven't reached the main substance and they expect there is still a long way to go] 
David Hughes present day: Kate was more often more visably distressed in the media than Gerry so they might have thought she was a...a....a weaker target, in some way. 
Anthony Summers: After that first session, she was advised by her lawyer that the police were offering a plea bargain. 
Goncalo Amaral: What was said is that it's a different thing to admit to concealing a body than to be later confronted with another much stronger accusation than merely concealing a body or fabricating a crime scene and that the sentances were completely different. Her reaction was very violent. 
[Jon Corner in an interview speaking on camer in 2007: Kate phoned me in the early hours this morning. And during our conversation, uh, she did tell me that the Portuguese police had offered to uh, cut her a deal and if she was lucky she'd only get two years]
[UK Male reporter 2007 as footage shows outside PJ headquarters and journalists everywhrere, waiting...: Friends of the family have told the BBC that they are unsettled with what is happening]
[UK Male reporter 2 In 2007: And we know now that in those interviews it was put to Kate McCann that she was responsible for the death of her daughter Madeleine, something that she strenuously denies...]
[Kate McCann stood outside the PJ with her lawyer Carlos Pinto de Abreu . Carlos speaks: The investigation is obviously still underway and, as you well know, we can't reveal anything. Now, I can assure you...]
David Hughes present day: When Kate emerged from her interview, Kate had really been sort of put through the wringer and had faced a lot of distressing and ridiculous accusations. 
Justine McGuinness: On the journey home, I remember just thinking she was utterly exhausted. 
Susan Hubbard: She just cried and cried. And she wasn't speaking. We didn't know what was going on. She just kept saying words, she wouldn't...And finally we realised she had gone through something where the police no longer believed her.
[Shows newspaper headlines UK saying about Kate's ''plea deal'']
127 days missing...
[Female UK reporter: Friends of Kate McCann say they expect her to be charged in connection with the disappearance of her daughter Madeleine]
[Male UK reporter: She'd only been back at her villa for a few short hours. Questioned into the early hours by detectives, Kate McCann was required again this morning. And as she left. she already knew she was to be declared arguida, a named suspect]
Justine McGuinness present day: In the journey we tried to make sure that the conversation was light. You're in a different legal system, so, you don't necessarily know how everything's going to work. You're not in control of the situation. 
[UK male reporter 2007: At investigation headquarters in Portimao, the police cleared a path. And alongside an enormous media presence, hundreds of onlookers]
Justine McGuinness present day: There was a media frenzy going on outside the police station, a clear signal that there was information going out to different media sources, and that we were facing something quite large. 
[Philomena McCann speaking in an interview in 2007 on the day Kate was being made an Arguida: We're just beside ourselves with worry now because, you know, where has this evidence come from? How come things have changed so drastically? How can Kate possibly be being accused of this? It's shocking] 
David Hughes present day: It was a horrid little gloomy building (Speaking about the PJ headquarters) Um...You know, darkened corridoors. It was a very sort of forbidding atmosphere. 
Anthony Summers: She sat there and had to listen to all the same sorts of questions, all over again, including that the suggestion that the dogs had seen some kind of sinister evidence during their searches. And more than 40 questions leading up to the notion that she had in some way had known about a fatal accident to her daughter and concealed the facts about her death. As Kate sat listening to this, she declined to answer every single question. She comforted herself by muttering under her breath, ''bloody tosser, bloody tosser.'' Just swearing quietly under her breath. 
Goncalo Amaral: What was in question was whether or not they had concealed a body and simulated a crime. She was made arguida and questions were asked and she refused to answer those questions.
David Hughes: I was in this anteroom with the British consul and some ordinary, you know, police officers. The news was on inside the police station. Outside, there was now a vast crowd in the square, lot's of media, and at this point Justine gave an interview highly critical of the Portuguese police in very unflattering terms. 
[Justine McGuinness to a reporter in 2007 outside the PJ headquarters: They made a series of ridiculous allegations. I mean Kate...]
David Hughes present day: I heard her saying this and I thought, ''Oh my goodness! What's their reaction going to be?'' And they were all going absolutely bananas. 
Goncalo Amaral: They always had to have someone with them to serve as a spokesperson. They were always very concerned about their image, which is something that shocks me.
[Justine McGuiness, same interview in 2007: Well, they believe they have evidence to show that in some way that she's involved in the death of her daughter, which of course is completely ludicrous. Reporter: But it's quite specific. What is? Justine: They--They have suggested that blood has been found in a hire car that they hired 25 days after Madeleine was taken]
Justine McGuinness present day: A lot of people involved in the investigation, English wasn't their first language. It's not just about language. There's cultural interpretations as well. The Portuguese police would have found it rather difficult to have understood why on earth, you know, you'd leave your children at home, if you're going out for supper with friends.
Sandra Felguerias: There was a very, very nasty criticism against Kate. Comparisons between the British and Portuguese behaviour, about being a mum in Portugal, and about being a mum in the UK saying that the English people usually leave their kids alone and this is normal. It's generated the image, the picture that Kate was the cold mum, the mum that didn't cry, that didn't have emotions. 
Susan Hubbard: Kate came back to us broken. Kate could be put in jail. She could be put in prison and without any control over this situation anymore. 
[UK Male reporter 2007: Can you just be clear with us? Are they suggesting from what was heard last night in the interviews that Kate is primarily responsible and that Gerry is some sort of secondary figure? Is that what was put to Kate? Justine: That was the suggestion, I believe, that was made]
[UK Female reporter: Kate McCann was today made a formal suspect in the disappearance of her daughter Madeleine. Friends of the McCann's confirm she is an arguida after police called her in for questioning again today]
[Male UK reporter: It is harder for the police to comment here because of the secrecy laws. A spokesman, though, told me that they were just doing their work, that they were looking forward to putting the truth on the table. He confirmed that Kate McCann has arguida status, a position that in this country has a clear meaning. Portuguese man says to the reporter: It means that you are a formal suspect in this investigation]
Goncalo Amaral present day: People are constitued as arguidos because they are suspected of committing a crime and not for having committed a crime. 
Justine McGuinness: You're dealing with an environment where the police probably think that a woman would be easier to break. Gerry presents as quite tough. 
[UK Male reporter 1 in 2007 as Gerry get's out of a car outside PJ headquarters: Gerry arrived to be interviewed as a witness]
[UK male reporter 2 amongst the other dozens of reporters: How do you feel, Gerry?] 
[UK Male reporter 1 continues: No words as he walked in, but on his blog today, he has said that if anyone knows about the May the 3rd, when Madeleine Disappeared, knows that Kate is innocent]
Justine McGuinness present day: The front of that police station, there's nothing welcoming about it. It's a door in a wall, really. Once you stepped inside, going from a light, sunny environment, into quite a cold and dark room.
David Hughes: We knew that serious alligations were gonna be put to them. 
Goncalo Amaral: He was shown footage of the dogs, that it was irrelevant, and at the end, he said something like, ''I don't see anything here that will help me find my daughter,'' Something like that. 
[Sandra Felguerias in Portuguese 2007: Right now, the interrogation of Gerry McCann, continues after six hours here in Portimao]
Kelvin Mackenzie present day: Some of the evidence is quite shocking. 
[Footage 2007 is shown Gerry stood outside the PJ headquarters in front of the press with his lawyer]
Kelvin Mackenzie: You're beginning to doubt the veracity of what you have been told by the McCann side. 
Sandra Felguerias: Everybody giving money, everybody crying and giving sympathy. Three months later, they are criminals. 
[Footage shown of Gerry and his lawyer again 2007 PJ headquarters. Reporter: Gerry, what is your status? Carlos Pinto de Abreu addresses the press: Kate and Gerry McCann...They have both today declared arguido. With no...[UK male reporter: And todays developement's have left the family angry. John McCann to a reporter 2007: Because anybody who knows Gerry and Kate knows that to implicate them in any way is ridiculous]
Kelvin Mackenzie present day: As they start talking about blood on the carpet and why was the window left open and was somebody rolled up in a carpet in the back of the car and all the rest of it, so you were beginning to be asked to believe...That the McCann's themselves were somehow responsible for their own child's disappearance, that the whole thing was a complete act, and that in some way they were laughing at you. They were responsible, and at the same time, they were seeking your money to help the investigation or to find the killer. You know, you could understand why, the Portuguese police might feel that...The McCann's are people we have to simply talk to. 
[Female reporter in 2007 as Gerry is getting out of his car outside their villa, after his lawyers press statement. Mr McCann, Hello, good evening. could you just give us some words, please? Gerry McCann as he's unlocking the gate: I can't say anything, I'm afraid. Female Reporter: Alright. How do you feel? - How do you feel Mr McCann? Gerry McCann: Tired. Sandra Felguerias: Did you expect, um, this decision today? Gerry as he's holding the gate open: Can you let the car in please? That's all I've got to say at the minute]
[Male UK reporter 1 outside PDL church: Exactly a month ago, Kate and Gerry McCann, in front of the worlds media, joined worshippers to mark 100 days in the seach for their daughter. Their plan to attend a service here tonight has been cancelled]
[UK male reporter 2: The vicar, who's become a close friend of the McCann's, says he's worried about Kate. Haynes: She seemed as in any mother who's just been told that she's a suspect in her own daughters death. Uh, she seems like a mother who has spent...Has had an hours sleep...is in a foreign country, and is worried about where her daughter is]
Susan Hubbard present day: It was an awful time. 
Haynes Hubbard: Mm-Hmm I remember thinking how stupid this is, how stupidly misguided this is because this is taking away from looking. 
Susan Hubbard: And the press was so crazy. The local people who were in Praia da Luz...Silently, quietly continued to support them. The Population of Portugual, not so much, no. 
Jim Gamble: People who were once standing alongside them were abandoning them. Uh, they were very much isolated and alienated, and you began to hear people saying things about them with regard to, ''Well, it's because of their status, they weren't properly investigated,'' And there were those undertones that acutally, ''If they're not guilty of the murder, they're guilty of absolutely neglect because they left their child by themselves.''
Goncalo Amaral: Leaving the child alone in a foreign place for hours on end--it was multiple evenings throughout the week--is negligence. 
Felicia Cabrita: I wouldn't feel safe leaving my daughter every night, from 8pm until 1am alone in a hotel room with her baby siblings. Therefore this guilt, whether the parents want it or not, they will have to bear. Because we don't know exactly what happened to Maddie. But one thing we know, she was abandoned on many evenings and on that evening she was alone. And that is the point. 
[UK Male reporter 2007: The BBC has been told by friends of the McCann's the latest developements mean they will now remain in Portugal. They say as well as finding their daughter, their aim is to clear their names] 
David Hughes present day: It was that weekend immediately after they had been made arguido's.
[UK male reporter 2007: With the media camped outside, Kate and Gerry have no plans to leave their house this weekend, not even to go to church] 
David Hughes present day: And so in the briefing, we said Gerry, Kate and the family are just going to keep themselves to themselves, nothing is going to happen. 
129 days missing...
David Hughes: We saw in advance that some people had alleged that it was a sort of, you know, cut and run following the events of the previous few days. And yes, there had been implications that they would stay and stay and stay. I know Justine had had a bit of an argument with Gerry about it. He said, ''Thank you for your opinion, but that's what we're doing,'' Basically. [Chuckle]
[2007 footage shows Kate and Gerry getting into their car]
Sandra Felguerias present day: There was the conviction that they were guilty. It become growing up inside of us. ''Why are they escaping?'' Why, if they are so sure that Madeleine is vanished, and she can be, whether in Portugal, or in Spain, or around, why don't they stay?
[2007 Footage of Kate and Gerry in their car, a male reporter yells: Why do you leave now?]
Sandra Felguerias present day: They don't want to be there because otherwise they can be arrested and they can't face that. 
[Back to footage in the car in 2007. Reporter: Gerry...] Camera's are still flashing like crazy.
Sandra Felguerias present day: Because if they were really looking for Madeleine and if they believe she is there, if it was with me, I would prefer to stay in Portugal and to look after her, despite everything the police and the judges could do to me. 
Goncalo Amaral: And they realised the investigation was going towards establishing or investigating their involvement in their daughters disappearance. With them here in Portugal...It was possible for us to reach this goal. They were very afraid here in Portugal.
Susan Hubbard: Kate couldn't imagine leaving Luz where she'd last been with Madeleine. But Gerry was very determined to protect his family. And they were feeling unsafe. They were trying to split them and ones confessing against the other and it felt really scary. They felt, how do they stay? ''We need to go for Sean and Amelie, so that I'm free to look for Madeleine, to fight for Madeleine, I can't do that if they're gonna put me in prison here.'' 
David Hughes: Now, it had been agreed between meyself and Justine, that I would accompany them on the plane back to the UK, and she would stay for dealing with the media interest from those who hadn't realised what was going on. 
[Justine McGuinness talking to press in 2007: Sorry, sorry, sorry: She accidently bumps into someone's microphone, looking as it falls on the floor. Okay, alright, just calm down everybody. Reading out a statement for the McCann's. ''Kate and Gerry McCann will be returning to the UK today with their twins Sean and Amelie as originally planned. They are returning to Britain after careful thought. They wish to reintroduce the twins as much as possible to an ordinary life in their home country.'']
David Hughes present day: By the time we were taken onto the waiting plane, about a third of it was full of camera crews who had bought tickets at the last moment, having heard what's going on. There was one particular, uh, camera crew who became particularly difficult and the captain emerged from the cabin and informed them that if this carried on, he would have them arrested. 
Haynes Hubbard: There was this tremendous sense of--sadness that they were going home without their daughter. 
Sandra Felguerias: That moment made me feel they were escaping from the nightmare, that Portugal had been for them, because everybody was shouting in Portugal, saying, ''You're liars, you shouldn't be here,'' 
[Male UK reporter 2007: Good afternoon, The parents of Madeleine McCann are due to land at East Midlands airport very shortly..]
Sandra Felguerias: And at the same time, I saw Kate and Gerry with the twins descending from the stairs of the plane, devastated by what was happening, what was being told about them, arriving in their home and trying to have some peace. 
[Gerry and Kate McCann holding the twins as they've gotten off the plane, press waiting, 2007, Gerry holds up a peace of paper to read from as he speaks: ''Whilst it's heartbreaking to return to the UK without Madeleine, it does not mean we're giving up our search for her. We cannot give up on our daughter until we know what has happened. We have to keep doing everything that we can to find her. Portuguese law prohibits us from commenting further on the police investigation. Despite there being so much we wish to say, we're unable to do so, except to say this. We have played no part in the disappearance of our lovely daughter Madeleine''] They walk away...

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Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann' Empty Re: Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann'

Post by Jill Havern 16.04.19 11:15

NETFLIX TRANSCRIPT EPISODE 5:


The disappearance of Madeleine McCann
Episode starts: Wind, thunder....Leicester, England.
129 days missing...
Lee Marlow speaking present day: I think Leicestershire's a kind of a hidden gem of England and I say that as a patriotic, you know, person born and raised here. Rothley is situated in North Leicestershire. It has a really nice fish and chip shop, a pretty village square, there are some nice pubs. It's your archetypal English village. I don't think it was know for anything really, [Stutters] The McCann case. 
[Haynes Hubbard speaking outside the church in PDL 2007: And I was thinking, ''Luz is gonna be quiet again,'' And suddenly I realised their little town in Leicester is going to be deluged with exactly what we've just had. Um...And they're not going home to quiet and...Peace. They're going home to the same struggle in another place]
[Male UK reporter 2007: A police escort out of East Midlands airport then the short drive to the village of Rothley and their home]
[Female U.S reporter 2007: Her parents vowed to stay until she was found. but they returned home this weekend without Maddie, clouded under suspicion after being named formal suspects in their little girls disappearance.]
[Male reporter speaking French 2007]
[Female reporter speaking Portuguese 2007]
[Male UK reporter 2007 as Kate is carrying Amelie into the house: This is the first time that Kate McCann and the twins have been in the home since Madeleine disappeared...Footage shows Kate's uncle Brian Kennedy waiting at the front door for them. [Over lapping reporters voices yelling to them] 
[Brian Kennedy, Kate's uncle, to the press still outside the house 2007: Kate hasn't been back to the house since this started. so it's going to be extremely difficult]
[Susan Healy speaking inside her home, wearing a missing Madeleine, look into my eyes T-Shirt speaking to a reporter: I do worry about how difficult it is for her to have walked through that front door today um, and gone into Madeleine's bedroom which is as it was when--when they left for their holiday. It must be absolutely awful for them. Camer shows footage of Madeleine's bedroom window with toys sat inside it]
[Two Female U.S anchors: Part of the reason the McCann's came back, their two-year-old twins--Wanting them to have as much of a normal life as possible, but so hard for them to return without their little Maddie]
[Helicopter flies above the McCann's house]
[U.S Female reporter: The twins often ask about her. They simply tell them she isn't here, at the moment, but they remain surrounded by her toys, her other belongings, and photographs as each day passes without her]
[UK Male reporter: The couple had left in May, hoping to return happy and refreshed after a family holiday. This was hardly the homecoming they'd prayed for]
Robbyn Swan present day: Kate and Gerry McCann had been chased from the Algarve, by the press, named as suspects in the investigation by the Portuguese police, uniformly being vilified. The truth is, though, they were not completely alone. There were people watching. 
Music introduction...
[Man's voice 1: You can sense them taking their gloves off and thinking, ''Right, everything changes'']
[Man's voice 2: Whilst you're looking at the parent's, you're not looking for the kid]
The disappearance of Madeleine McCann episode 5 - The fightback...
[Plane whooshes ahead]
Mallorca, Spain.
Robbyn Swann present day: One of those people watching was a businessman by the name of Brian Kennedy.
Brian Kennedy: I was following the story like everyone else. I saw that the media and the world had turned against these people. I was thinking, ''No way! Abso--I'd lose all faith in human nature if these parent's are involved.'' We were in the fortunate position in which we had all the resources to be able to reach out and help them. [Brian speaking on the phone: And what's the headline?] Many of my friends said to me, ''Why are you getting involved in this? What happens if they're guilty?'' And my response was, ''But imagine if they're not guilty.'' 
Patrick Kennedy: If you can do something to help, then you bloody better try and help. I think that's something, you know, that my dad is all about. 
Brian Kennedy: When I waled into their lawyers offices, they both looked like a wreck and I explained, that, ''Look, I'm here to help,'' Kate started to tell the story and after 12 seconds, just reading the emotions, everything told me, 100 percent, that this woman was absolutely genuine and she was a victim. I said, ''You don't have to tell me any more, Kate. Let's just get on now and talk about what we can do from here to try and find Madeleine.'' 
Robbyn Swan: Kate McCann recalls how overwhelmed she was by the thought that this man they didn't know was willing to put his cash and time on the line to help them. She could barely keep herself from flinging her arms around his neck and just breaking down and thanking him. 
[Brian Kennedy speaking on the phone speaking Portuguese] 
Patrick Kennedy: I was proud of him that he wanted to help another family that were going through such turmoil, such a tragedy. It's like, ''Right, let's do something to help this. This is not right.'' 
[UK Male news anchor 2007: A Scottish millionaire businessman is giving financial backing to the parents of missing Madeleine McCann. Brian Kennedy, who made his millions from double glazing, has pledged to meed Kate and Gerry's growin costs to help in the hunt for their daughter. The tycoon who's estimated to be worth, 250 million pounds, is based in Cheshire]
Brian Kennedy present day: I grew up in a high rise blockof flats in Edinburgh, working-class family. I got married very young and uh, had to start paying bills. Built up various successful businesses.  [ Video footage shows Brian Kennedy speaking at a press conference: The first rule of business, is to stay in business.] If you walk into your boardroom, make sure you're the dumbest guy in it! [Chuckles]
[Reporter 1: It can't have been the homecoming of course, that Kate and Gerry McCann were hoping for four months after their daughter disappeared from their holiday flat in Portugal. The couple have returned home after being declared official suspects.] 
[Reporter 2: They could hold that arguido status for eight to ten months, and in that time, either one of them can be called back to Portugal to be questioned.]
Brian Kennedy present day: The first thing was to be able to get Kate and Gerry sufficient legal protection to ensure they couldn't be taken back to Portugal, from which we're all sure they would have been hung, drawn, and quartered. 
[BBC Anchor talking to Philomena McCann on BBC breakfast news in 2007: How angry are you, how angry are they about being made official suspects by the Portuguese police? Philmena McCann: The fact that they have been made this arguida status, they're not allowed to discuss things. They have been effectively gagged by the Portuguese. I'm furious, the rest of the family are furious. It's adding insult to injury. They're at an all-time low and the Portuguese legal system to us is a complete maze and we now need help to negotiate that and that process has already started]
Brian Kennedy present day: One of the top lawyers is a guy called Rogerio Alves. He was a well-respected lawyer in Portugal. The Portuguese had decided Kate and Gerry were guilty. For him to represent Kate and Gerry was a major cultural issue for him. 
Rogerio Alves Lawyer for Kate and Gerry McCann: The case was not very popular in Portugal. I used to go very often to the television, to the media, to talk about justice matters. So I was truly aware that the public opinion court decided that they had to be guilty. 
[Footage shows Gerry going into PJ headquarters 2007 as reporters yell: ''Gerry! Gerry!'']
Goncalo Amaral present day: When they left Portugal in September, it had been agred that we should follow an enquiry that allowed for the possible involvement of the parents in the childs disappearance. When they left for the UK, someone saw them coming off the plane. 
Robbyn Swan: In Praia da Luz on the night of Madeleine's disappearance, an Irishman named Martin Smith and his family had seen a man carrying a  little girl wearing pajama's, um, in the street, not far from the Ocean club. 
Goncalo Amaral: Martin Smith, sees the images of them coming off the plane...And he says, ''This is the man that I saw, This was the man I saw taking that child.'' Because of the way he carried the child, the way he walked, it was the same person that he'd seen before. 
[A picture of Martin Smith's police statement to a police officer in Drogheda, on the 30th January 2008 as a male's Irish voice speaks: I would be 60 to 80% sure that it was Gerald McCann that I met that night carrying a child. 
Rogerio Alves present day: All those voices saying, ''They are guilty, guilty, guilty, guily!'' I went to London in September 2007. I want to look in the eyes and reach my conclusion...
Picture shows arial view of London and...140 days missing...
Rogerio Alves present day: I met Gerry and Kate. We talked for a long time. What I found was a father and a mother suffering, fighting against all odds, trying to understand why everybody's considering me guilty? ''What have I done? Is it not enough what happened to me? Is it not enough that my daughter disappeared, that nobody can find what happened, that nobody can provide me solid information? Is it not enough that I cannot sleep?'' 
Brian Kennedy: At the end of it, he said, ''Fine. I will support you and I will represent you, and fight your corner,'' and he proceeded to do so. 
Rogerio Alves: I had some comments. ''Well, he's going to...To win a lot of money. He's making this for money.'' 
Brian Kennedy: Going into petrol fuel stations and on a few occasions, people would spit on him, when they knew he was representing, defending the McCann's. This is what we were up against here. 
[2007 Male News Anchor speaking in Portuguese: The head of the bar association believes that the McCann couple are innocent. Rogerio Alves, says that this was the defining factor in his decision to accept and defend Madeleine's parents.  Rogerio Alves in Portuguese: It was my personal and lengthy conversation with the couple that led me to accept the job...]
Rogerio Alves present day: But I don't care much, to be honest, because I'm a lawyer. What I intend to do is make things fairly and to protect my clients, especially when they are right. 
[Rothley - United Kingdon. Video footage shows the ress surrounding the McCann's house. 2007]
Phil Hall present day: I think people, you know, criticised the McCann family, for, you know, dealing withthe press so much, but you have no choice. They're not going to leave you alone. They will follow your every move, TV cameras, radio crews. I think people want to try and paint it as a pack that followed them from Portugal up to Leicestershire. Well, when you've got a story of this magnitude, to somehow say to the press. ''Well, just go away and forget it.'' It's not gonna happen. The public are not gonna allow that to happen because they want to buy the newspapers and read the stories. 
David Hughes: The British media were under huge pressure. Two things they were told to do was get great photographs of the McCann's, Kate in particular, and, you know, possibly the twins if you can, which, of course, raised completely separate ethical issues, and the other thing was get a new angle to the story. 
[2007 David Hughes talking to press outside the McCann's house: All they're doing is taking the children out to a sort of play area, probably for about an hour. Um, so if you could respect that um, and, you know, when they come out of the gate, when they come back in, don't crowd in. Please don't take photographs of the twins. Okay? Don't all shout ''yes'' at once!]
Phil Hall present day: Soon after the McCann's return to Britain, I drove up to meet them. I drove up one night, it was very late when I got there, I think seven or eight O'Clock, and, um, they were sitting in the kitchen and Gerry made me a cup of tea and I was struck by how...Shocked and how completely riddled with grief Kate McCann was. I felt very uncomfortable, actually, being there, talking about a missing child as some sort of PR exercise because, you know, we were to discuss what they were to do and, um...Gerry was very strong. He had a sponser who'd come forward, a businessman, who was prepared to pay for the PR to help him, and he wanted to know whether we could put up five or six of my staff onto the campaign, try and keep Maddie's name alive and out there in the press. I said, ''Gerry, I think, you know, you've got to be careful. I think if it's too well-oiled a machine, I think the public will feel very uncomfortable about it.'' I spoke to Gerry once or twice more, but nothing materialized from it. I think in the end, he understood that I just thought having too slick a PR campaign would work against them. 
[Female UK reporter 2007: Mr Mitchell says he's been hired for as long as it takes...Voice trails off saying. His salary paid for by an anonymous businessman...] As footage shown of Kate and Gerry and Clarence Mitchell outside their house addressing the press]
Lee Marlow former journalist present day: It became, you know, that already high excitement with the trucks with the satalite dishes and the cameramen and the photographers and the journalists and they're all jostling for position and they all want the story and, you know, even as a journalist, it's what I do, it makes me wince when I see that.
[Male UK reporter 2007: Madeleine's great-uncle was surrounded by the media as he gave a short statement at the village green. Brian Kennedy: They're fine. They--They've had a decent nights sleep and between...]
Lee Marlow present day as footage is still being shown: You could feel that some elements of the British media, you could sense them taking their gloves off and thinking, ''Right, everything changes.'' 
[Footage shows the Daily Express headline: Syringe found in Madeleine's apartment...Then another: Maddy 'Pills overdose'... Daily Express again: Madeleine: Body hunt at incinerator.]
Nick Carter, Former editor, Leicester mercury newspaper present day: Rothley's a perfectly pleasent, nice place where, you know, something like this, satalite trucks and cars full of journalists, would have come as a substantial shock. 
David Hughes: When some of the Portuguese media became more hostile and included accusations and in effect were much less inhibited in what they were inferring or alleging, then the pressure on their British counterparts just became immense.
[2007 Footage press outside a small church in Rothley. Male UK reporter: With their twins in Sunday school and hidden from the camera's, the McCann's found themselves amongst friends. Inside they were embraced by other members of the congregation]
Sandra Felgueiras present day: The reporting I was making, the things I was saying, they disaprove 100 percent of it. I had this impression of people that didn't want me there. 
[Local elderly Man speaking to the press outside the church 2007: I think you're...You're cruel to this couple. The agony she's going through, nobody knows. And I think you should leave her alone]
Sandra Felgueiras present day: There was some people that came to me and said, ''What are you doing here? You are invading their privacy.'' 
[2007 Local resident man coming out of the church doorway asks the reporters: Excuse me please. Sandra Felgueiras: Have the McCann's talked to you? Male resident laughs...Sandra Felgueiras: Do you...Do you still believe that Madeleine is alive?  Male resident as he's locking the church door: Yes, of course she is. Sandra Felgueiras: Do you support the McCann family? Male resident: Yeah, of course we are. Male Portuguese reporter: Do you like to see them in church again? Male resident: Of course we would like, but they can't get out of the house because of you people. Local elderly resident dismissing the reporters: No more please. Thank you. Male Portuguese reporter: But did you pray for Madeleine? Woman ignores him. Sandra Felgueiras speaking in Portuguese...]
Sandra Felgueiras present day: Everyone that we tried to talk to knew the McCann's, didn't want the press there. They just said, ''You have to leave our town!'' 
[Local woman resident 2007: I think it's just terribly sad for everybody involved and I think the media should leave them alone outside the house. Footage scopes press outside the house. Local male resident: No, Rothley village will support them totally. We--We've agreed they need to have that time and space and there's a lot of support in the village from the residents]
Nick Carter present day, Reading out a Leicester Mercury headline: There we go. ''Please leave.'' ''Angry villagers call on media to give McCann's some space.'' It lists the media organizations in Rothley, showing that it's not just British media. It's Portuguese, Belgian, French, German, and so on. It just captures the concern of residents for saying, you know, ''We're fed up with it.'' 'Cause they stick their camera's in your face and they're not always the politest of people. A good local or regional newspaper holds up a mirror to the community to which it belongs. Yes, you want to sell newspapers, but, equally, you want to do it responsibly because it's your constituency, because they're your readers, that you're talking about.  You have a doorstep and you step off that doorstep and you're in the middle of the community of people who you hope are reading you, and so, to put it bluntly, you don't want to shit on that doorstep. Many of the nationals had kind of wim-wommed on their coverage. One minute, the McCann's were responsible. The next minute, they were grieving for their missing daughter. We didn't have to distance ourselves from the national hysteria because there was never any suggestion that we were ever going to be part of it. We were the local newspaper. That's what we did. So, Um, our concern was to--Was to do that properly, to do the right thing by the family and to do the right thing by our readers. National tabloids are trying to sell against each other and what they put on their front page can make a significant difference to whether they sell more or fewer copies than their rival titles. So, ''You killed Madeleine.'' is a pretty dramatic front page that was guaranteed to attract peoples attention. Um, it also happens to be pretty poor journalism. 
Lee Marlow: We tried to tell the story. I think what we tried to do was to tell the story as truthfully and honestly as we could. I think there were all kinds of newspapers who were jumping to all kinds of conclusions and we never did. [Newspaper headline 2007: Maddie body burned...] They were not charged and they were not convicted and I think it's a, you know, fine old English tradition that you are innocent until you are proven guilty and I think that was our watchword. That informed everything that we did. [2007 Portuguese newspaper headline ''Police suspect Gerry is not the father.'' is shown amongst others] 
Phil Hall: The agenda moves on so quickly every day. [Headline 2007: Maddie's body in parent's car] They would have thought, ''Actually, I can write a story on a Tuesday 'Cause by Friday, there will be 40 other stories that have broken and my story will be forgotten.''
John McCann Gerry McCann's brother: Things start off in Portugal, with no accreditation to an official source and end up being reported here as if they are the truth. That is just crazy! Why are we spending so much energy and time negating rumours and speculation? 
David Hughes: And this story would appear, let's say, in a British newspaper. The Portuguese press would then pick up on it [2007 headline: Maddie: 'DNA in hire car is hers' shown] And sort of escalate it further. 
[UK Female reporter 2007 in Portugual: This landscape of speculation is made possible partly because it is difficult to sue the media here and libel damages are small. So what if some information tarnishes the reputation of people who might be totally innocent? Footage shows lots of different Portuguese and UK newspaper headlines] 
Justine McGuinness present day: It's unrelenting. And, you know, things seem to be getting worse and worse. 
[2007 male reporter in Portuguese: The police is still awaiting for the lab results to come from Birmingham. According to Jornal 24 Horas, the results conclude that Gerry McCann is not the biological father of Madeleine]
[2007 UK male reporter: There have also been claims that Kate has been asked to hand in her diary and that Gerry's been asked to give in his laptop. Having spoken to people close to the McCann's, they say that's simply not true]
[2007 UK male reporter PDL church: Kate and Gerry McCann visited the church here in Praia da Luz almost every day after Madeleine went missing. Today it's been reported that the police plan to search even here, but there is no sign of such a search, and no confirmation that any kind of search is even planned]
Kelvin Mackenzie present day: In our world, if there becomes a question like, ''Did you sedate Maddie?'' it becomes a fact. The answer doesn't matter, right? The answer is, ''Yes, I did sedate Maddie.'' That's how people view it. They don't care that he said, ''Oh no, I didn't do that.'' They don't take that into account. They simply say to themselves. ''No smoke without fire.'' 
[2007 The express headline: Madeleine - Body thrown into the sea]
[2007 Filming Kate and Gerry opening letters and cards from people: Kate McCann: This is a very nice letter. It's actually from a mum being very supportive in what we've done and are doing. We've got a lot of letters as well from people with children the same age. Um... (Box shown that says 'well wishers') The vast majority, 99 per cent of them, they're really nice and supportive, and then unfortunately, as we know, there's that one per cent of society... Um... (Another box shows writing, Psychics, visions and dreams above that box label says 'nasty' ) who send the nasty ones. Gerry McCann: That's a good example. Um...The giveaway 'cause normally it's pretty obvious (He holds up a Christmas card then opens it) and this says, ''Gerry and Kate, how can you use money given by poor people in good faith to pay your mortgage on your mansion...You [bleep] thieving bastards? Your brat is dead because of your drunken arrogance. Shame on you. I curse you and your family to suffer forever. Cursed Christmas. If you had any shame, you would accept full responsibility for your daughters disappearance and give all the money back. You are scum.'' That's quite nice. Very charming]
[2007 Male UK reporter: The McCann's remain formal suspects and could be asked to return to Portugal any day. Until then, they remain here in Leicestershire, attempting to assemble a formiddable media and legal team...]
Brian Kennedy present day: Kate and Gerry were very conscious of who they could and who they couldn't trust and they trusted Clarence. 
[2007 Footage shows Kate and Gerry McCann and Clarence Mitchell coming out of the McCann's house. [Female UK reporter: They're calling it ''The Fightback'' After days, of rumor, allegation and innuendo, a new media strategy led by a former journalist and civil servant]
Brian Kennedy present day: Kate and Gerry were saying, ''Look, we should try and get Clarence Mitchell on board full-time because he can then deal with all the media and we need the media to be on our side on this.'' 
[Back to the 2007 Clarence Mitchell and the McCann's to the press. Clarence Mitchell: Good Morning. I'm Clarence Mitchell, for those who don't know me... [Male UK reporter: The foreign office official who'd been advising the McCann's will quit his government post to work full time for the couple] Clarence Mitchell: To suggest that they somehow harmed Madeleine. accidently or otherwise, is as ludicrous as it is nonsensical. 
Phil Hall present day: He was a very competent, uh, sharp individual. You know, very aware. 
[Clarence Mitchell 2007 saying to the camera's: If it's a war, I--I'm trying to hopefully, you know, call a truce]
Phill Hall present day: He was out there, having a drink with them in the evening, he was talking to them, he was giving off-the-record briefings. He was telling them how the McCann's were and how they were feeling. 
Lee Marlow: It seems cruel to say it backfired on them, but I think some people--Some people certainly thought that, ''Well, look what you've done here. You've hired...'' I heard this, I heard this many times. This is what people were writing underneath our stories.You know, you've hired this kind of professional news reporter to manage this story. It looked slick. It was incongorous I think.
Ernie Allen: They attempted to communicate in an effective way, using PR and the media to get the message out that Madeleine was still out there and they needed help. Um...That, in some eyes, made it look too slick, you know, too polished, too professional. 
[2007 Female UK reporter to Clarence Mitchell: Some have commented that the McCann's havent come across that well, that they haven't been seen to be grieving enough, for example. How are you gonna advise them on that? But who's to say how much you should grieve?]
Justine McGuinness present day: You know, at the time, Kate was very aware that she was, in some way, not seen as caring. They'd been advised that, you know, if they showed emotions that that might be detrimental to the welfare of their daughter if she was being held kidnapped somewhere. So they had decided that they had to be very controlled when they were in public. 
Ernie Allen: These families are trying to communicate in the most effective way. They're trying to reach the abductor and plead with the abductor to get their child back. They're trying to communicate to the public the urgency of the situation and ask for the publics help. 
[Footage 2007 Gerry and Kate on ''This morning, a UK Mid-Morning TV program'' Gerry McCann...And that's what we really are asking people to try and emember were they in a situation like this, had something else happened, had they seen someone. This time last year,''Where are you going on holiday? Spain? Portugal? I have a map here and...]
Ernie Allen present day: So there is a kind of mindset that happens in which parents try to be self-controlled. 
[2007 Back to the ''This morning interview'' Presenter: The frustation... Kate McCann: There's obviously certain things we just can't control and I think we're getting used to kind of...]
Ernie Allen present day:   They try not to be so devastated that they're not effective communicators and as a result they can come across robotic. And so there was criticism of the McCann's, particularly Kate, and that was fed by social media.
[Shows social media messages show on the screen: Message 1 - I've never seen such creepy control in a woman. She hasn't shed a tear since her daughter disappeared. Message 2 - God ugly Bitch, says it all doesn't it? Message 3 - She's not a woman, she is a MONSTER.]
Lee Marlow: I think the website was perhaps three or four years old and it was very much an afterthought. It was all about the newspaper. 
[Shows a Leicester Mercury headline of Kate to be named a suspect in 2007]
Lee Marlow: We put the McCann stuff online and people started to comment on it. 
[Social media Message 4 2007 shows on screen - I hope that every waking moment is hell for them and that they have nightmares when they sleep. Message 5 2007 - How can those two sewer rats show their faces in public?]
Ernie Allen present day: Social media was in it's infancy. Facebook was a year old. Twitter was just being launched. 
[Social media messages show again from 2007  Message 6: They make me sick. McMurderers]
Ernie Allen present day: Social media fed the paranoia about this case and distorted the message.
[Social media messages again from 2007 Message 7 comes up on screen: The elite couple who know what happened to her and where they hid the body. Evil pigs. The truth has to come out soon poor Maddie]
David Hughes present day: You can go on the internet, look at the McCann thing and you'll find every lunatic conspiracy theory going. 
[Social media message eight from 2007: He hid her body in the church and moved it at a later date. Social media message nine: Gerry McCann is a creep and he and his wife Kate are guilty of murder. He is being aided by the freemasons to cover it up. The truth WILL come out sooner rather than later]
Ernie Allen present day: In 2007 there were a lot of people who viewed that content as news. That it's on social media it must be the truth. 
[Social media message 9 2007:  Madeleine died in apartment 5a and the McCann's covered it up]
Phil Hall present day: If you're in a pub and somebody offers a view about your business or your football club or your performance onstage, do you really care about it? They don't, but when they read it in the printed word, it has far more impact.
[Social media message 10 2007: They certainly are leaving no stone unturned to silence anyone who won't buy their bullshit story - Message 11: I hope Kate McCann dies]
Phil Hall present day: What happened with Kate McCann, in particular, some of the trolls really affected her. 
[Social media message 13 2007: Cruella McLiar makes my skin crawl and my stomach do summersault. Her and her sidekick Gerry are as guilty as they come]
Phil Hall present day: The internet gives the troller all the power and none of the responsibility. 
Lee Marlow: I don't think I even knew what a troll was back then in 2007. And then it just got more and more and more and more viltrolic. 
[Social media message 14 2007: EVIL BASTARDS!!! YOU PAIR ARE SCUM!!! LOOK AT HIS REACTION AND LOOK AT HERS!!! IF THAT'S NOT GUILT THEN I DON'T KNOW WHAT IT IS!!! Social media Message 15 2007: The parents are paedophiles]
Lee Marlow present day: That's when we took the decision to say, as a newspaper, to stop it and to close all comments.
[Kate McCann and Gerry McCann in an interview in 2007: Kate McCann: I know how much I love Madeleine and I have no doubt that Madeleine knows how much...[Kate's voice cracks and eyes well up with tears] You know, I love her and I think...I mean, I know that and I've just got to think, regardless of what all those people say out there, you know, those bloggers and people on the forums who...Obviously get some kind of kick out of being nasty, I know that and I know Madeleine knows that and, I've just got to kind of keep hold of that, really]
150 days missing...
[2007 Footage shows the McCann's with the twins and family and friends: UK male reporter: This is Kate and Gerry McCann attenting a church service yesterday in Rothley. It was the 150th day since their daughter Madeleine went missing]
Robbyn Swan present day: On September 10th, Goncalo Amaral's deputy produced a nine-page report outling what would become the basis of the Policia Judiciaria's case against the McCann's. In it, he highlighted, Uh, the DNA evidence, the alleged evidence of the dog alerts. The most important thing he outlines in that report is what he characterizes as ''Inconsistencies,'' Inconsistencies that he says are bordering on incoherence in the testimony of not only the McCann's but all of their friends as to what actually happened that night. Inconsistencies in their timeline, inconsistencies in their tale of what had transpired. And from this, he concluded that, in his words, ''Everybody is lying.'' 
Paulo Pereira Cristov: We have a mainframe of time, two, three hours. Okay. What happened? What were you doing? They said it to the police, they give their testimony, so let's put that--That testimony to a proof. 
Goncalo Amaral: The truth is the couple never declined to participate in the reconstruction. By reconstructing the events, you can prove a lot of things.
Paulo Pereira Cristov: In that moment you can confront people with some false testimony, for example, in that moment, because when you say, ''I go there and I...Uh, I only five minutes,'' And then when you start to make all the way and say, ''Oh, this is 20. Why did you say five?,'' You see.
Goncalo Amaral: A lot of the time, the reconstructions lead the suspects to confess to having committed a crime. 
Rogerio Alves: I find that one of the most ridiculous things, that, uh, suddenly that you find those--a group of friends that were having holidays, spending holidays in a hotel in the Algarve, they all become a criminal association. And the thing was so stupid that you could picture it like this. ''Well, I went to my room, I just killed my daughter, which is a mess, but, please, don't tell anybody. And I need your support just to masquerade of everything.'' This is absolutely stupid, ridiculous, and I don't know how it was even possible to think that everybody was associated with this plan. 
Anthony Summers: A conspiracy of two people is possible, concievably a conspiracy of three. But conspiracy by seven people working together is--Is so unreasonably improbable. 
Jim Gamble: Where there are innocurous, you know, inaccuracies or reflections, then human nature being what it is, in a stressful situation, people are going to relate the same story that they've seen in different ways, and, that is--Is absolutely normal. I think a lack of consistency can often, um, provided it's not too outlandish, indicate a level of integrity around the information, rather than the opposite. Now the difficulty is if you are clutching at straws and then you begin to go back over that which you already have and try and view it in a different way. 
Brian Kennedy: Everything was geared around the cadaver dogs. Across the newspapers in the UK, across the world. It was all about what these cadaver dogs found. That was the basis of the evidence.
[UK female BBC breakfast news anchor 2007: Now, the results of further forensic tests could hold the key to what happens next in the Madeleine McCann investigation. Portuguese police hope to hear from scientists based in Britain in the next few days]
Robbyn Swan: Months later, when the Portuguese police were getting ready to submit their case file to the prosecuting magistrate, they finally received the final British DNA report from the living room of apartment 5a near the sofa where the dogs had alerted and from the boot of the McCann's rental car. One after another, they listed the DNA samples as being meager, too complex, inconclusive, unable to be satisfied. There never did emerge one single identical match for the DNA of Madeleine McCann. Moreover, there was not a trace of blood ever identified as having come from either the McCann's holiday apartment or the Renault Scenic. Not the blood of anyone, let alone Madeleine McCann. 
Goncalo Amaral: I would sum up the work of the FSS lab in one very simple way: Manipulation of the results. Now, who was responsible for that, who made that happen, I couldn't tell you, because I am not in the United Kingdom. 
Robbyn Swan: Years later when we were doing the research for our own book on the subject, we submitted the DNA evidence to two senior forensic scientists, who between them had more than 60 years experience working in the field. In the words of one of them, the forensic material in the case amounted to a whole lot of nothing. The dogs were portrayed as infallible, their abilities so unique that anything they produced was actually, uh, evidence that Madeleine had died and that blood or a body had been found. That wasn't true. 
Martin Grime: We're tending to add more and more specialist subjects to detection dogs. Um...We've now got dogs that not only fine narcotics and explosives, firearms, we've got dogs that will indicate people that might have disease. We've got pipeline detection dogs that find leaks from gas pipes. We cannot at this moment in time and we'll never be able to take a dog into court and say...Well, first of all, we can't question the dog because it doesn't speak our language. But, we'll never be able to turn around and say,''The dog found this, so therefore somebodies guilty.'' 
Jim Gamble: When that DNA was captured, you know, from the car, the boot of the car, the media created the impression it was a major breakthrough and a definitive piece of evidence. 
Gonalo Amaral: Regarding the dogs signalling, they're indications. The police can't just say, ''Nothing has happened.'' Something might have happened. 
Martin Grime: At the present moment in time, the science isn't available to prove that my dogs right. The dogs are purely there to provide intelligence to investigators to give them a lead as to where to go. 
Goncalo Amaral: Talking about the DNA traces found in the car, let me tell you this. There is an important thing which is that it's an indication of the possibility that something was transported there. The body may have been hidden in some sort of freezer somewhere, and been trasported later in the boot of the car, and bodily fluids may have dropped from the corpse. 
Jim Gamble: An indication from a dog, is an indication from a dog, and unless there is independent evidence to corroborate that, then it means nothing.
Justine McGuinness: I had to repeatedly explain to journalists that it wasn't until, you know, 25 days, I think, after she disappeared that they actually rented a car.   
Goncalo Amaral: The Freezer hypothesis originaes from the circumstances. The car was rented many days after the disappearance and the possible death of the child. As to what happened to the body before that, whether it decomposed, if it was buried, frozen, probably the most correct conclusion is that it was kept in a place where it could be preserved in the cold. 
Justine McGuinness: It's a difficult thing to imagine how anybody could actually hide the body of a child for quite a long period of time in a warm environment. 
Sandra Felgueiras: What have they done to the corpse in those three weeks, if they were every time in front of us? I saw them from morning, to evening, every day. 
Robbyn Swan: The dog handler, Martin Grime, had said from the outset, that no evidential or intelligence reliability could be placed on the dog alerts alone, unless they had been substantiated by corroborating physical evidence. No evidence of that kind ever emerged in this case.  
Sandra Felgueiras: I have a lot of sources inside the PJ and I talked with many people inside the PJ. They told me that they found the strong evidence inside the car.  
Jim Gamble: This was Madeleine McCann's DNA and then it was maybe a slightly diluted version that it was so close to Madeleine McCann's DNA that it should have been, you know, or could have been the key for the investigation. Then you know, that's when you need to actually take a deep breath and step back.
Sandra Felgueiras: When I saw the whole report, I think it was in October, I felt they just lied to me. Uh, the truth was not that. 
[Footage shows Sandra in 2007 saying to the camera in Portuguese:...The girls genetic profile, SKY news is also reporting it won't just be an 80% match, but a full match]
Robbyn Swan present day: The report concentrated on three principle specimens. Two from the living room of the McCann's holiday apartment. The other sample came from the boot of the McCann's rental car, that Renault Scenic that they had rented several weeks after Madeleine had disappeared. The first sample yielded a result that...Suggested that it could contain some DNA from Madeleine. It showed matches on various points of Madeleine's DNA profile but not all of them and, significantly, it was difficult to decide and to decipher from what was there whether the sample had come from the DNA of more than one person. 
Jim Gamble: There was no way that you could differentiate the DNA that was found in the cluster as being the DNA belonging to a specific person. 
Robbyn Swan: It was also impossible to conclude from the DNA evidence what bodily fluid had produced the DNA sample. It could have been saliva, seman or blood. It could have been any of those. The second sample, uh, was far too complex for any result at all and no evidence that Madeleine's DNA was there at all. The DNA that was found in the boot of the Renault, uh, was the most challenging of all. Of 20 matches that would have to occur for this to have been proven to be Madeleine's DNA, there was a match across 15 of them. Now, that sounds very damning, but one has to remember that Madeleine's DNA sequence comes from a mixture of her father and mother. So, the DNA in the Renault could equally have belonged to members of the McCann's extended family, from Madeleine's mother, father, Sean or Amelie, all who legitimately had been in the car. They all shared DNA. 
Jim Gamble: The fact of the matter is 50% of Madeleine's DNA would have come from one parent and 50% the other. 
Robbyn Swan: Moreover, the scientists wrote, there were actually 37 components present in the sample and that meant that there were as many as three different people who's DNA were mixed into this sampling. 
Jim Gamble: Fifty percent of the DNA that was found could be found in a large number of the scientists in the forensic laboratory who were actually carrying out the investigation. Ultimately, when you read through the detail of the DNA, you see the absolute red herring it was but it was a dangerous red herring because I think investigators in Portugal thought this was the smoking gun and the definitive evidence. 
Sandra Felgueiras: My inside sources lied to me. I called Amaral. I ask him, ''What's this? The blood found inside the apartment and inside the hired car, the McCann's car, can belong to anyone. Because the sample is very little. And the last paragraph said exactly this. ''This sample is so minimum and is so common that we have plenty of people here that have exactly the same mark.'' How can you talk, about such a serious thing, a crime, neglecting all these issues that are absolutely important to understand the case?'' And he said to me, ''Look, we have an evidence and our translator didn't translate everything. He just translated the first paragraphs''
Goncalo Amaral: I never informed Sandra Felgueiras about any of the details of the investigation. 
Sandra Felgueiras: That was my turning point. And when this happened, I understood that the intention of those cops that were inside this investigation was not honest. 
[2007 U.S male reporter in Rothley: One of the more bizarre aspects of this case is the lack of evidence to support any theory. The abduction tale has gone cold and some people are calling this DNA evidence as pretty flimsy and Robin, remember, Madeleine's body has not been found]
[2007 Male U.K reporter: The Portuguese had built their case about what happened in apartment 5a, but it soon came tumbling down. Take that sighting by the Smith family. It couldn't have been Gerry McCann because so many witnesses place him at the Ocean club at the time. The Smith's themselves now believe they saw someone else]
Anthony Summers present day: And there was the suggestion that Madeleine's parents might have caused their death. They might have over-sedated her, Um, by administrating a drug. The fact is the two children dozed on without making a sound or crying for six hours after the disappearance of Madeleine. But this prompted in Kate a thought that perhaps they'd been sedated by an abductor, who'd applied some sort of drug on them, who'd applied some form of drug to them to make sure they stayed asleep while he went about his criminal business abducting their sister. And there was suggestion he might have also sedated Madeleine while removing her from the house. So, the question must remain, were they sedated by an abductor? 
Jim Gamble: When the McCann's were--were....their status changed and they were made arguido's. I--I actually thought the Portuguese police were clutching at straws. So I was confused, probably as most people, and that's why you begin asking questions within the law enforcement community, and when you begin to realise that the assertion that it's now the parents on the back of...A flawed interpretation of indications of a dog or low copy number DNA, then I really had deep concerns about the approach of the Portuguese police. 
[2007 Olegario De Sousa at a press conference:....Because we are not magician's. we...All the authorities involved are doing...]
Sandra Felgueiras present day: Why do they let everybody believe that report of the Birmingham lab said something it didn't say?
Rogerio Alves: And every day, the police was questioned, ''What happened? What have you done? Did you have any advance? How are you now? What did you find? What is going to happen? How close are you to--To find, to arrest somebody?'' But one of the responsibilites of the investigation created that theory, and said, ''Well, I know what happened and this is what happened,'' Uh, and I believe that the press find that point of view attractive.
[2007 Olegario De Sousa at a press conference:....We are--We are searching for...]
David Hughes present day: I suppose the first question is did they ever believe the allegations they were making, or had the intensity of third-party criticism towards them over how they had reacted on the night when Madeleine disappeared on how they'd behave subsequently led them to adopt this approach as a defence mechanism against their own perfomance? There were certainly reports that they were worried about how it was going to impact on their tourist industry, so on, and so forth. 
Patrick Kennedy: I believe the police didn't want--Didn't want this case. They didn't want a missing Madeleine. They didn't want for people to be thinking across the globe that Portugal is a place that if you go to, your children will get abducted, or could get abducted. 
Brian Kennedy: So you could understand how the...The mood of public opinion would go from sympathy to vilification. ''Let's find somebody to blame for this that doesn't make us look bad.'' 
[2007 Female Portuguese reporter in Portuguese 1...It's very likely that the larger searches on the sites...]
[2007 Female Portuguese reporter in Portuguese 2...Madeleine's parents...]
[2007 Female Portuguese reporter in Portuguese 3...A vigil where people are asked to...]
Brian Kennedy present day: I think that's all tied into the tourist industry and tourism being down and the finances, the GDP of the country and everything else. it's much easier to say, ''Aha! We've found some idea, leads, that the parents could have been involved in this,'' 
152 days missing...
Anthony Summers: Late in October, Amaral took a call on his mobile phone and remarked to a member of the press that the British police were just dancing to the McCann's tune and doing what the McCann couple wanted. 
[2007 Male UK reporter: A Portuguese chief inspector gave an interview, accusing the McCann's of creating lines of enquiry and blasting Leicester police for hampering his investigation into Madeleine's disappearance]
Goncalo Amaral present day: The pressure was enormous. The pressure in terms of the demands, what they said about us, of them considering us a third world country with techniques from the middle ages. Led by a drunk, fat guy, a decrepit police officer. 
Anthony Summers. It was the end for Amaral. He was out of his job. 
Goncalo Amaral: The investigation ended there. It ended on the day of October 2nd with my dismissal. 
Anthony Summers: There is one report the then-British Prime Minister Gordon Brown actually made a phone call saying he wanted to be sure that that man, Amaral, was dismissed.
Goncalo Amaral: Why is the Prime Minister, Gordon Brown, so concerned with this investigation? It's not just a couple. It's several couples. Upper-Middle class British doctors who lets say, ''Screwed-up.'' in the backyard of a third world country. And this is something that can't happen in terms of UK's image. 
Paulo Pererie Cristovao: When he looked behind, there was no one there to support him. He thought that he has lots of people to support him. But when--When he needs that support, nobody was there. Not National director, not Judiciary Police, nothing. Not the Facebook fans, nothing. If shit happens, you take the blames. That's the Portuguese way of doing, that's it. 
[2007 Male news anchor speaking in Portuguese: Goncalo Amaral was dismissed because he criticised the behavior of his British counterparts]
[2007 Male reporter speaking in Portuguese: Paulo Rebelo, the new supervisor of BIC, is expected in Portimao this afternoon. Yesterday, for several hours...]
Robbyn Swan: After Goncalo Amaral's departure, a new investigator, a new chief investigator was brought in. That was Paulo Rebelo. On the very first day he arrived on the job, uh, Rebelo gave a press conference. When asked if the McCann's were still prime suspect, he said that that was only a speculation and emphasized that all lines of enquiry were still open. From that point on, there seemed to be a fresh sort of impetus behind the case, a fresh wind behind the case. 
Sandra Felgueiras: Thank God Goncalo Amaral was replaced for the other cop. Goncalo Amaral in my opinion, didn't...Didn't make his job as he should. Because he let that journalists like me thought that the McCann's were implicated. 
Brian Kennedy: I think Kate and Gerry would have given up their lives to find Madeleine.But there's also your own personal pride and honour as an individual. For somebody to...To go through that pain and somebody to then accuse you of the most heinous crime possible...
Jim Gamble: I have moved as I've seen the anomalies in the evidence and everything else to a position where I do not believe that Kate or Gerry McCann had anything to do with the...The fact that their daughter has gone missing and potentially been abdcuted. That doesn't mean that as a professional police officer, I didn't come on a journey from, you know, point A where that was the hypothesis I would have followed, through to point B and C, where you began to question and think, and then ultimately to you see absolute anomalies in the evidence ironically in the case against them and ultimately in the behaviours that you see within a family that is, in essence, loving. If you've ever seen, you know, very young children who have been abused or neglected, there's a reticence where they are around a person who, um, they fear and when the younger children were around Gerry and I saw them 'round him, they were all over him, uh, in a way that just would not be consistent with someone that didn't absolutely love their children and wasn't absolutely adored by their children.
Ernie Allen: I think Gerry's reaction was pretty typical. What you sense most is pain, you know. I also sensed anger and a sense that he was committed to doing everything he could do to make something happen, to get his little girl back.
[2007 Video footage Kate and Gerry McCann talking to press in Rome, Gerry McCann: We're very much on our minds is the fact that we're here without Madeleine]
Jim Gamble present day: Nothing that was said, nothing that was done, um, in any way by Gerry was inapropriate. And in essence, what it was was someone in absolute shock holding it all together and needing to have that ultimate level of control just to keep putting, I think, one foot in front of the other. The entire McCann case has become a phenomenon online. And so there's lots of people hiding behind the anonymity that the internet presents to simply attack and malign people, um, and who present themselves as being authoritive about the case yet misinterpret, either by accident or design, some of the key factors, which is what spreads myths about the dogs, which is what spreads the myth about the definitive nature or not of the DNA and forensic evidence. So it says to ordinary people that it just must be one of those awful cases where police know who did it, but can't actually prove it and what that does, one, it's fundamentaly unfair to the parents, two, it goes against, you know, natural justice, innocent until proven guilty, but three, and critically what it does with three, is it stops other people from looking. 
[As footage is being played 2007 Kate and Gerry McCann interview (Ask the dogs Sandra) footage is being played. Sandra Felgueiras present day speaks: And this is so wrong. This is...This has such bad consequences that even today, I feel a little embarrassed, not to say, very embarrassed, of having been part of this. 
[Footage shows Sandra Felgueiras in 2007 saying to the camera in Portuguese: It won't just be an 80% match, but a full match]
[Footage shows Sandra Felgueiras in 2007 saying to Gerry and Kate McCann: Did you give to your kids something like Calpol to help them sleep?]
[Footage shows Sandra Felgueiras in 2007 saying to Gerry and Kate McCann: How can you explain the scent of cadaver by British dogs? Kate McCann: Sandra, maybe you should be asking the judiciary because they've examined all this. Sandra Felgueiras: But don't you have an explanation for that? Gerry McCann: Ask the dogs, Sandra...[Chuckles] Sandra Felguerias: Ask the dogs? No Gerry...]
Robbyn Swan present day: The media attention and the fury raised around the dog alerts has stuck in the publics imagination. As far as many people are concerned, they prove the McCann's guilt in some way. 
Haynes Hubbard: If anybody ever said or gave clear factual evidence that ''Here's Madeleine's body,'' or, ''Here's is clear evidence...Clear information that she is no longer alive,'' then they'll accept it. But until somebody says that Madeleine is not going to come home and proves it, they're gonna believe she is. 
Susan Hubbard: Yeah.
Haynes Hubbard: And good for them. Bless them for that.
Ernie Allen: For these searching parents, it never goes away. So even if the result is a terrible one, it's the not knowing that's the worst part. It's that lingering doubt. So, you have to do what you can to keep hope alive and to keep the search going. 
Jim Gamble: You do not bring your children away to kill them. You know, if you're going to do something to your child within your family, you know, you do it somewhere you're in absolute control. And you do not raise the alert and alarm and continue to press for an investigation, regardless of everyone else saying, ''Enough, enough, enough.'' You know, if you are the person that's, done something that you want to hide, you know, you're happy when the mists of time begin to overshadow it and people stop talking about it, wheras that's never, ever been the case with Gerry or Kate. 
[Video footage shows of Madeleine as a baby/toddler with soft music]
Brian Kennedy speaking on the phone in Portuguese: If you have any information on the whereabouts of Madeleine McCann, please...Get in touch with me and you will be well compensated. Thank you. [In English] There was a sighting of...The family up in the Atlas Mountains, carrying on her back, this mother carrying on her back, a child, a blonde child that absolutely looked like Madeleine. Now, I remember phoning Kate, and saying, ''Kate, do you want me to go out there?'' And she said, ''Yes, if you would please.''

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Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann' Empty Re: Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann'

Post by Jill Havern 16.04.19 11:16

NETFLIX TRANSCRIPT EPISODE 6:


The disappearance of Madeleine McCann
Atlas Mountains. Morocco.
Footage opens up showing villagers and the mountains.
Brian Kennedy: There was a sighting of the family up in the Atlas Mountains. This mother, carrying on her back a child, a blonde child, that absolutely looked like Madeleine.
[2007 U.S Male reporter: A couple from Spain was on vacation in Morocco when they snapped the photo when they snapped the photo. Clara Torres says she's been kicking herself for not turning it over to the police sooner]
Patrick Kennedy present day: I got a call from my father, and he said he'd like to meet me. So I went to the house and met him in his study. If I ever went into that office, it's 'cause I'd done something wrong or, you know, something good was happening. He sat me down. He said, ''Son, have a seat.'' He broke the news that he'd like me to come out of what I was doing in the business and throw myself 100% at helping in whatever way my father and I could. I wanted to follow my dad, and help my dad and help Kate and Gerry. 
Brian Kennedy: We flew into Morocco on my little--Little jet, myself and my son Patrick. 
Patrick Kennedy: The adrenaline was pumping because we've got a girl here who we believe could be Madeleine, as it looked almost identical to her.
Brian Kennedy: I said to my son, ''Go out and just try and find someone that can speak English that we can hire to drive this car and take us up into the Atlas Mountains.'' 
Patrick Kennedy: I remember saying to my father, '' Look, I've got no experience in, investigative work or anything,'' I was, like, a bit nervous. I spoke to someone there and I was just straight with him. I told him what I was doing, I said, ''Look, we'll give you some money we need you to help us. We need you to try to find this girl.'' 
Brian Kennedy: And so we jumped in the car and drove right up into the Atlas Mountains. The thing that shocked me, in the middle of these mountains, in the middle of Morocco, was the amount of blonde-haired kids.  
Patrick Kenned: So after a few hours of literally just driving around and talking to people, we ended up tracking down this little family. 
Brian Kennedy: We were sitting looking at this lady carrying this child, which was the photograph that this tourist had taken. I took a picture and I sent the picure back to Kate, and I said, ''Kate, I'm sorry, it's not Madeleine.'' The way I used to put it, ''We're searching for a needle in a haystack that may not exist.'' So it's tough. It was very clear we weren't getting anywhere very fast, so I thought we need to go out and find some top quality people that knew how to do this competently and effectively. So I met, Metodo 3. They're a privately-owned private investigation company, not frightened to step over the line and do what had to be done to try and find Madeleine, and uh, I said, ''Go for it. Delve into, what you know you can delve into below the surface of what's going on and the criminal factions in that area, in Portugal, in Spain, and in Morocco. find out what you possibly can.'' And they went about it, I have to say, with great gusto. 
Intro Music
Patrick Kennedy: Perhaps you should never judge a book by it's cover. We're all taught that from an early age. 
Melissa Little: He looked gaunt and wild-eyed.
The disappearance of Madeleine McCann - Episode 6 - Dark places.
Barcelona, Spain.
Julian Peribanez - Metodo 3 Private investigator: I'd always had a thing for investigations. when I was really young, I loved police movies, James Bond movies. But from where I came, it was not easy to get into, so it took me quite a while. I had been in Metodo 3 around a year and a half, when the Madeleine case came in. The reputation of the company was really high. Really high. It was one of the most well known companies in Spain and Europe. We had a big meeting in Brian Kennedy's office. That's the first time I met Gerry and Kate. I was talking about the different possibilities of what could have happened that day, and of course I had to talk about the possibility of an organised group of criminals that could have kidnapped Madeleine. And Brian Kennedy at that moment told me, ''Please, we have to stop for a moment.'' and I saw Kate and Gerry, they were crying. At that moment, I realised of course they have nothing to do with the disappearance of her daughter. When you meet the persons, it becomes personal for you. From that moment, I left for Portugal and I spent almost eight months non-stop out there and trying to search for any clues. 
Praia Da Luz, Portugal.
154 days Missing.
[2007 Male reporter in Portuguese: The Spanish detective agency hired by the McCann's has 20-25 people currently working on the ground in Portugal]
Julian Peribanez present day: I remember that he caught me with a camera and I was trying not to show my face. 
[2007 Female reporter in Portuguese: Despite one of the investigators trying to avoid the camera's, the man, who is around 30 and working for the McCann's, hasn't gone unnoticed]
Julian Peribanez present day: The first thing that Metodo 3 did was creating a hotline to try to obtain leads. 
[2007 Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford on UK TV, This morning with Clarence Mitchell. Ruth Langsford: It has been very emotional watching them at the interview this morning. Um...I think this is to promote the hotline that they've set up. Clarence Mitchell: There was a very good simple reason for doing this interview. It was done at the advice--On the advice of our private investigators, who are now working on the ground in Spain. They want people to call this new anonymous, confidential hotline. Ruth Langsford: Let's hear with what they had to say about what they're hoping will come out of starting that hotline]
[Footage goes to Kate McCann: Please help us. Please help us as a family. Please help us find Madeleine. I strongly believe that Madeleine is out there. I don't believe that Madeleine has been taken away from us perminantly. I don't believe that. I don't feel it. Please, if you know any informtion at all or you suspect anything. no matter how small, please...You know, just...[Sighs]...Find it in yourself really. Have that courage to make that call to the new number. Gerry McCann: Thank you. Brian Kennedy as Kate's being comforted by a woman and Gerry: You did a really good job in getting Kate's true personality out. I think that was good. I think now we need to get on with finding her, you know? Footage shows Kate upset]
Julian Peribanez present day: You have to understand, the investigation in Portugal was not focused in finding Madeleine. It was focused of finding evidence to blame the parents of Madeleine. So people that could have an idea, who have seen something, they were not interviewed.
[2007 phone dial tone Julian Peribanez: Yes, hello? Enlgish Male: Who am I speaking to? Julian Peribanez: You're speaking to Julian...]
Julian Peribanez present day: They forwarded the calls to my personal number 24 hours. I was taking phone calls at five in the morning, six in the morning.
[On Metodo 3's answering machine messages]
[2007 Woman caller: I'm calling you from Zambia]
[2007 Man's voice in Spanish: Good Morning. Is this the Madeleine hotline?]
[2007 Woman's voice from in the U.K in English: I live in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire]
Julian Peribanez present day: There was a lot of tips of people that thought that they saw her. ''I was in a supermarket and I saw a car and I think I saw Madeleine.'' 
[On Metodo 3's answering machine messages]
[2007 Man's voice, English accent from the UK. My wife and I were returning from France and I saw a man, a young man, and he's carrying a little girl and I thought, ''Well, that child looks like Madeleine.'' But then, for all I know, hundreds of children might resemble her]
Julian Peribanez present day: You have to understand, in these cases, people usually want to help, of course, and they want to help so hard that they start seeing things that are not there.
[On Metodo 3's answering machine messages]
[2007 Woman's voice from Scotland: I'm actually...I'm a clairvoyant from Scotland and I've actually helped police before...]
[2007 Man's voice English accent: For 25 years, I've been seeing things before they happen]
Julian Peribanez present day: The problem is that of course 95% of the people that call were mediums. 
[2007 UK woman in English: I saw a picture of Madeleine. She was being looked after by somebody called Lisa]
Julian Peribanez present day: I've seen crazy, crazy things, people moving a pendulum in front of me and I was over there sitting and I was like, ''What the hell am I doing here?'' but, like, who knows?
177 days missing...
Mallorca - Spain
Brian Kennedy on the phone speaking in Portuguese: I am asking for your help to find Madeleine. If you have any information get in touch and you will be compensated. Thank you. [In English] Even if somebody says they've had some sort of metaphysical revelation, you can't discount anybody or anything. You may not believe in such things, but you don't know what's behind it. You could sleep more easily at night. There must be nothing worse than thinking, ''That may be Madeleine, and nobody's--Nobody's checking it out.''
[Video footage 2007 shows a woman holding the hand of a little blonde girl via CCTV]
Anthony Summers present day: To give a notion of the sheer avalanche of sightings of the missing Madeleine McCann, there have been thousands and thousands of reports from 42 countries. 
[2007 Female reporter 1 in English: Possible sightings of Madeleine McCann...]
[2007 Female reporter in Spanish Shows little Bosnian girl mistaken for Madeleine on screen]
[2007 Female reporter 2 in English:...A girl matching the four-years old description...]
[Footage shows a little blonde girl with a man CCTV in 2007]
Anthony Summers present day: Anthony Summers present day: And on one day alone, she had been seen in places, 2,500 miles apart. There were multiple reports, even on the day that she disappeared. 
Goncalo Amaral: I remember that in one day, the child had been seen in Zurich, then in Rio De Janeiro, or in other places, in Morocco. A lot of information, a lot of it contradictory. 
Praia da Luz, Portugal, Ocea club resort...
Patrick Kennedy: Jane Tanner was a friend of Kate and Gerry's. She dined with them in the evenings. Her sighting was a big turning point for the investigation.
Brian Kennedy: For Jane to have seen somebody, I think it was, twenty-past-nine or something, walking across the street with a child that looked like Madeleine, for me was the prime evidence. That was the only bit of evidence we had, the only true witness. 
[2009 footage from Madeleine was here. Gerry and Jane and Jez Wilkins in Praia da Luz outisde apartment 5a: Jane Tanner as an acted reconstruction is being shown to her voice: I think the starters were about to arrive so I thought, ''I'll go and do...I'll go and do a check.'' It had been sort of 20 minutes or so before we'd last checked. I just walked out of the restaurant. At the top of the road I just saw somebody walking across the top of the road and that person was carrying a child. Carrying sort of, across the body like that. [Jane demonstrates the action to Richard Bilton how she'd carry a child across the body] I suppose, in retro... hindsight, you'd probably think, someone would carry them more against the shoulder. I think it's important that people know what I saw because, you know, I believe Madeleine was abducted]
Brian Kennedy present day: I think up until then, there'd been some ridiculous drawings done by the Portuguese police. It made sense to find somebody who knew what they were doing. to draw a proper picture. So we did some investigations and found this FBI artist. 
Melissa Little: I trained as a portrait painter. A portrait must reveal more than the outside geography of a person. You want somehow to catch that spark, something of their personality and character. So I bring that to inform the work I try to do to help the police. Jane came and spent the day here and, uh...Many tears were shed by both of us that day. It's all about the attitude of this man, quickly, purposefully marching forward, carrying this...Limp child. There are two little...Dear little legs, child's legs hanging down over his arm, um, wearing, pink, frilly, patterned floral pattern pyjamas and two little bare feet hanging down. She was convinced that this was Madeleine's abduction. And...She was blaming herself of course. Why didn't she intervene? Jane struggled and struggled, but eventually had to give up. The acutal face. That was the stumbling block. It's a private horror in their heads. When they have unburdened themselves of this, they've told me and I've made it visable, it's a great relief. Um...It's...That's it. It's out on paper. That is the evidence.
Brian Kennedy: We thought this was who had taken Madeleine so we thought, ''Well, lets get this character out there,'' And we got that picture distributed, as far as we could.
[2007 Female news anchor in Portuguese: Kate and Gerry McCann have broken their silence...]
[2007 Male UK news anchor in English: The parents of Madeleine McCann have released an artists impression of a man they believe may have abducted their daughter]
[2007 Female U.S  reporter: A friend vacationing with the family in Portugal says she saw this man the night Madeleine disappeared, but didn't see his face]
Barcelona - Spain
Julian Peribanez present day: Private investigators in Portugal are illegal.  Being a private investigator, you don't have to follow the book of rules. It gives you more freedom to investigate than being a cop. I had always a big board, Uh, where I wrote all my suspects. It was a lot of people I recall. 
Patrick Kennedy. Julian was very good to work with. I'd be out there for weeks at a time, following possible suspects. Julian was someone that was very thorough and energetic and he was unforgiving with certain things. When we were pursuing people, he would rather speed to chase up with them so he could find out where they were going rather than be careful and to watch what he's doing 'cause he doesn't want to get stopped by the police. He was the type to go all out.
Julian Peribanez: Patrick Kennedy, he was a young kid at that time. We spent hours together, doing some stakeouts, surveillance, he was a quick learner, yeah.
Patrick Kennedy: We found out names and addresses of paedophiles in the Praia da Luz area. We'd follow them. We weren't allowed to do that. We needed the permission of the police to do that, but, you know, quite frankly, I didn't care and neither did M3. We just wanted to get on with it. 
Julian Peribanez: There was several places that we went that were crazy. One of the sightings that they told me was that Madeleine was in an abandoned home. I was walking and looking everywhere, trying to find something that related to a little kid, a doll, clothes, something. But, no, I couldn't find anything.
Patrick Kennedy: Julian and I were following a guy who lived in a pig farm and there was something that came through, saying that they believed he had something to do with Madeleine's disappearance. You're thinking, ''Could Madeleine be in that house?'' It was difficult not to kick the door down and have a look. 
[2007 UK male reporter 1: Flying over the apartments from the east and after a couple of seconds, the villa where Robert Murat lives  quickly comes into view]
[2007 Male reporter 2 in English: A 33-year-old male living in the area of the events was named as a formal suspect]
Julian Peribanez: When I got over there the person that we look more into was Robert Murat. Everyone was pointing at him. We didn't know what the PJ had against him. We only knew that he was argudo so we thought there has to be some evidence against this guy. 
[2007 Footage of Murat and another man walking, a UK male asks ''Hello Mate, you alright?'' Murat continues to walk past]
Brian Kennedy present day: There's so many people that had a feeling that Robert Murat was involved and I said, ''Let's just go and meet him.''
Robert Murat: I did meet with a gentleman called Brian Kennedy, who, uh, was, um. a multimillionaire who had, um, links with the McCann's. He was over there to find the solution to the story and um, I assume, believing that I had something to do with it. 
Brian Kennedy: I went out to meet him. I just had a very pleasent dinner and had a chat about it and I was talking to Robert about, ''Look, it must be terrible to be accused of something you weren't involved with.'' All the time, of course, gathering information. 
Robert Murat: Actually, I think there was an offer of an job or something, because I couldn't get work. I couldn't do anything, could I, so....[Stammers] Literally, I had no chance of doing anything.
Brian Kennedy: ''Would you like to work with us and helping us to find Madeleine?'' 
Robert Murat: I then found out that he had tried to bug the meeting with people in the garden trying to record the conversations. [Radio static crackling] 
Julian Peribanez: We put some trackers on Murat's car, and he found them. [Slight chuckle] Sometimes you have to do things that....That are on the verge or on the border, no?
Robert Murat: So, he wasn't there to help me at all, and that was the really frustating part of all of this case, is we had nobody. 
Julian Peribanez: Related to Murat was Malinka, Sergey Malinka. Pictures of Malinka. [Julian is looking at a laptop screen] That's his building. That's the shop that he work. Malinka was suspected by the police, but they don't have enough evidence, to declare him an arguido. He was a computer technician living in Praia da Luz. A Russian. 
[Footage shows as he speaks, Sergey walking on the rocks, Praia da Luz beach] I've been coming here as often as I could because it's quite a special place. It sort of leaves you alone with your thoughts. Whatever you see after the black mountain there, is Praia da Luz itself. It's a very beautiful village, and it will always be my first home in Portugal. But this is a place where I got hurt quite badly. 
[2007 footage. Male UK reporter 1: Sergey Malinka, a 22-year-old Russian]
[2007 Male UK reporter 2: He is the latest person to be talking to police...]
[2007 Sergey Malinka speaking to a reporter: We have a strictly customer relationship]
Sergey Malinka present day: But it's not the place that hurt me. It's the people. [2007 Footage shows Sergey hiding in a car, sound of tires schreeching]
[2007 Male reporter in Portuguese: The Correio da Manha newspaper reports that the computers apprehended from Sergey Malinka had their hard drives erased]  
Sergey Malinka present day: It was almost impossible to live a normal life after I was interviewed by the police because I had wherever I go, I would be looked at. For example, you go into the coffe shop and you order a coffee. Then you just look around and you see people looking at you and then they'll look away and then something clicks in and look back at you again, but with a judging look, so to speak. ''This is the guy that we saw.'' The active suspect makes a phone call to somebody. Exactly the night of the disappearance. Of course, it raises suspicion. Actually [He points to an apartment building] this is my room, that balcony where my room were at the time. I've been called paedophile, I've been called  sexual predator, I've been called Russian Mafia, human trafficker. [Footage showing Sergey coming out of his apartment building, camera's clicking by the press] It was--Just bang out of order. 
[2007 Female UK reporter to Sergey Malinka: What particularly do you want to set the record straight on? Sergey Malinka looks into the camera: Well first of all, I'm not 30 years old, uh...Second, I don't rape little kids. Uh, I'm a normal man. I don't do any of this kind of stuff. Third, my criminal record has been clean always. Uh, I'm a resident of this country so they would have checked it before they would give me a card. Uh, and I simply feel hurt by the media, the way they describe me uh...]
Patrick Kennedy present day: There is no doubt in my mind that Malinka was hiding something. He's strange, he's been destroying hard drives, He knows Robert Murat. 
Sergey Malinka: I think that came up from some sort of a leak from the police, media leaks that my hard drives have been erased, but apparently the police found something on them so they couldn't have been erased. I couldn't have erased them. These sort of facts should be checked and double-checked and triple-checked before they're published. 
Patrick Kennedy: He wasn't a very savoury-looking character, to put it lightly. Perhaps you should never judge a book by it's cover. We're all taught that from an early age. But sometimes you do. 
[2007 Footage shows a car and crowd clamouring with Sergey Malinka inside]
Sergey Malinka present day: My first experience of private surveillance was when I saw the same cars has been in my rearview mirrors. I made a list of certain number plates and, yeah, I find out the same cars were following me. 
Patrick Kennedy: We were chasing him 'cause it looked like he was trying to get somewhere in a rush. Sergey Malinka was not the type to confront us. He was the type to get in his car and speed off. Was he getting up to no good? Was he meeting people we perhaps have pursued? What was he doing? 
[UK Male Interviewer to Julian Peribanez present day: What was the surveillance that you did on him? How did you approach the investigation? Can you reveal that?]
[Julian Peribanez smiles and sighs]
Julian Peribanez: Well, there's a lot of things I cannot reveal for what we did! [Slight chuckle] My boss, he told me to call him and to offer him money to talk about the disappearance of Madeleine McCann. 
Sergey Malinka: In this sort of situation, you understand that there's two types of people. One with power, and one without. Or should I say one with money and one without. I think it's this...I think it was here, yeah. [Sergey Malinka is in the street where his girlfriend at the time in 2007 lived. There's parked cars. He points to one spot on the road] Exactly here, in the place of this car. In this situation, I didn't have neither the power nor the money. It was written here on the pavement. If you can see, still some red smudges here. Ten years pass but it's here, you know?
Julian Peribanez: I started with 100,000 and I went until half a million, something like that. And Malinka was, ''Don't offer me money because I don't know anything and I cannot give you anything.'' That's what he told me. 
[A picture from 2007 shows Sergey Malinka's car burnt out and the letters spray painted on the pavement ''FALA]
Sergey Malinka present day: Fala means ''Speak'' in Portuguese. They thought I'm hiding something. I know if you look at it, it's just a car, it doesn't mean anything, but for a young guy who always dreamed about this car, it was sort of the greatest achievement I've done in my life, you know what I mean? So I'm sitting on those stairs, actually crying, and...This one missed phone call...It has been pretty much ruined ten years of my life. That's the only time when they actually broke me in this case. Really, really hurt me. 
Julian Peribanez: We did a thorough investigation on him. But, Um, the more that we look into it, the less I thought he was involved. Neither Malinka, Neither Murat, I don't think they had anything to do with it. Nothing.
Patrick Kennedy: No, I didn't feel sorry for anybody at that time. Irrelevant. What was very relevant was the little girl that was missing, the little girl who'd been abducted. That's the person thatI felt sorry for. Nobody else. 
Julian Peribanez: Portugal, it was a new place for me. I didn't have my resources I that I have in Spain. I tried to get in touch with people that could give me some idea, clues of things that had happened there because you have to also, of course, look at the background of the police, of the situation, of any crimes related to that or how that place works. A good source for that, it's journalists. 
[2007 Sandra Felguerias in English: In Portugal, we just have a comparison with this case. This is the case Joana  that happened in 2004 here in Portugal, here in the Algarve...]
Julian Peribanez present day: Joana Cipriano was a little girl that disappeared in a very small town next to Praia da Luz. 
[2004 A female news anchor in Portuguese: A little eight-year-old girl from the village of Filgueira, has been missing since Sunday night. (12th August 2004 shows on screen) According to the mother, Joana had left home to buy some food at the local shop]
Jorge Almeida, investigative journalist, RTP Network present day in Portuguese: We thought the case was very interesting and mysterious. She lived with her mother as well as her uncle at the time. The mom was doing interviews for Portugues TV channels saying she didn't know where her daughter was and that she'd probably been kidnapped. 
[2004 Leonor Cipriano, child's mother footage speaking in Portuguese: The police have been searching, but they don't have any leads for the whereabouts of her]
Julian Peribanez present day: Afte a week or so, Policia Judiciaria, they close, basically the case and they said that it was Joana's uncle who had killed the girl with the help of Joana's mother. 
Paulo Pereira Cristovao - Investigator on the Joana Cipriano case: The immediate story that the mother and the uncle said to the police was that she went out and she didn't come back. It was their story. Joao decided, ''I'm going to tell you the truth and Joana entered in our house and saw me having sex with my sister.'' 
[2004 blurry footage shows Joao and a man speaking in Portuguese]
Julian Peribanez present day: And that they, uh, chop her up, they cut her in pieces, and they put it in a fridge. 
Paulo Pereira Cristovao: And he explained cut, by cut. They separate the arms, the legs, and the head, six parts of the body. Then he explain, ''We put it in bags.'' And they have put bags in the fridge. They have a little fridge in the room. And we have found human blood in the fridge. It was impossible to--To say that it was blood of Joana. But, it was human blood. 
[2004 Footage of crowd chatter, and Portuguese police officiers in uniform. Female reporter in Portuguese: The case took a horrific turn when Joao told of how he disposed of his niece's body by throwing it into a pigpen]
Jorge Almeida present day: They were both found guilty. Leonor was sentenced to 20 years in prison and Joao to 19 years. 
Julian Peribanez: There's a picture that came through of the mother. After she--She...Had ''Confessed.'' Uh, she was all beaten up. All beat up. 
Jorge Almeida: She accused the police of torturing her so she would confess to the crime. Both confessions seemed very strange. So we suspected things didn't add up. 
Julian Peribanez: The police chief in charge of that investigation, was Goncalo Amaral. The same one that was in charge of the Madeleine case. You have to understand the police in Portugal is very different than the police we have in Spain or the police that we have in other European countries. Very, very different. 
[2005 Female reporter 1 in Portuguese: The inspectors will be questioned about these photo's...]
[2005 Male reporter 2 in Portuguese: Five Policia Judiciaria inspectors are accused of assaulting Joana's mother, Leonor Cipriano. The little girl killed in the Algarve in September of 2004] 
Paulo Pereira Cristovao present day: She has a mask like Zorro, Okay? And you look for that, ''Oh, poor...'' They were beating her on the eye. That didn't happen, okay? She has an accident. 
[2005 Female reporter in Portuguese: Joana's mother maintains she was assaulted during her interrogation, but the inspectors claim that she fell down the stairs]
Julian Peribanez present day: What I found was like the Spanish police of the '70's. He acted and worked like if he was the sherrif of the town. ''This is my town, I do whatever I want.'' 
Goncalo Amaral: Both Joao and Leonor, all they did at the time was lie, lie, lie. These bruises, these black marks are interesting. No one managed to prove that these photo's are real.  
[Goncalo Amaral on a Portuguese programme: Male interviewer in Portuguse: Let me ask you a question. Do you think that many people from this counry believe that Leonor Cipriano killed her daughter? There are very few people, Goncalo Amaral. Very few people. And how could we believe that a woman with no education, who was beaten by the Judiaciary Police and this was proved...Goncalo Amaral cuts in in Portuguese: No, it wasn't proved. Male interviewer speaks over him: How would she be that smart....]
Robbyn Swan present day: There was a cloud hanging over Goncalo Amaral at the time that the Madeleine case began. He was under investigations himself for his actions in regard to the Ciprano case and the actions of his collegues. 
Paulo Pereira Cristovao: It's better that the people understand one thing. We were not accused of torturing Leonor. They said, ''Okay, if they don't beat you, they let someone enter in the police to beat you.'' 
[Same Interview with Goncalo Amaral on a Portuguese programme: Male interviewer in Portuguse: She was taken from her cell at night. She was taken to the police's facilities and when she comes back, she's bruised.]
Robbyn Swann present day: And in fact, on the very day the McCann case broke, Goncalo Amaral was himself made an arguido in the Cipriano case.
Paulo Pereira Cristovao: Me, and two colleaguese, we were absolved. Goncalo was condemned. They say that he has forged a report. They say that he knew it that somebody beat her. 
Goncalo Amaral: For me, in the case of Joana Cipriano, I was declared an arguido for false declarations. 
[Same Interview with Goncalo Amaral on a Portuguese programme: Male interviewer in Portuguse: Not for beating her, but for making false claims about the case. Goncalo Amaral: Oh, you want to talk about that? Do you know how we got those false claims? I'll explain it to you]
Goncalo Amaral present day: It was a set-up by the public ministry to constitute me as an arguido to take me to trial. But this fact of being arguido in one case and be the coordinator in an investigation, it's not incompatible. Because, if it was, any police officer made an arguido would have to stop working. 
Jorge Almeida: After the trial, we noticed that evidence against Joana's mother and uncle was not strong at all. 
[Fuzzy camera footage of a Male in Portuguese saying to Joao: Why did you keep taking us to places there was no body? During his confession to the police]
Jorge Almeida present day: With Joao, through my investigation, I had the opportunity to watch the video of his confession to the police on how he killed his niece.
[Fuzzy camera footage of a Male in Portuguese saying to Joao during his confession: This is the question: If you killed her, you killed her or did she disappear in some other way? Did you kill her or not? 
Jorge Almeida present day: It's a weird confession because he contradicts himself a dozen times. We rented a fridge exactly like the one Joana's mother had where they said they had hidden parts of her body. We were able to prove that the child couldn't fit in those drawers. So their statements weren't true. 
Julian Peribanez: But you're talking about the fridge that Joana's mother had in her house was a small fridge like that [Motions a small width with his hands] So you're talking about putting an eight-year old in a fridge like that. It was unbelievable. It was...It's relatively...It's impossible. But Amaral, he has a case and a kid goes missing, he puts them in a refridgerator. 
[2004 Female reporter in Portuguese: Human traces were found in the pigpen. But again, the results were inconclusive]
Jorge Almeida present day: No trace of Joana was found on the farm. Not a hair, not a bone, not a tooth. No trace of DNA. 
Julian Peribanez: We started working on the links between the Joana Cipriano case and the Madeleine case. You have a town that was, like, 20 kilometers from Praia da Luz. And the police, they do a mess on the evidence. The two cases were very similar. 
Goncalo Amaral: No, I didn't see the similarities. The only similarity you can say is the gender, the gender of the victim. In general, in these cases of involving the disappearance of children the primary suspects are the guardian's of that child. 
Julian Peribanez: When they see they don't have any lines of investigation or clues, they blame the parents directly. It's not a case about finding Joana. It's not a case about finding Madeleine McCann. It's a case about finding evidence against the parents.
Jorge Almeida: I remember clearly, a few days after the disappearance of Madeleine McCann, I recall asking myself. ''Knowing the investigators, will they change the course of investigation from kidnap to start accusing the parents?'' And that is exactly what happened. 
262 days missing...Praia da Luz, Portugal.
[2007 UK male reporter: Before Madeleine disappeared, before the campaign and the controversy, Gail Cooper saw someone. A man acting strangely...]
Brian Kennedy present day: Gail Cooper was a lady who had had somebody visiting her door that left her feeling, uh, very vulnerable and very suspicious.
[2007 Gail Cooper speaking to a reporter: Because we reported it to the police back in May, the 7th May 2007. He said he was collecting money from a local orphanage in the nearby village of Espiche.  He then went on to say about a road accident a three days earlier where three British children had been left orphans and were now being cared for in his orphanage. UK Male reporter: Mrs Cooper was staying just a few hundred yards from the McCann's apartment. She saw the same man loitering about the resort on three separate occasions, twice on the beach and once when he called at her villa, claiming he was collecting for an orphanage...Gail Cooper: He was quite emotionless, really, very cold to look at but he was quite agitated, he was moving from foot to foot on sort of the balls of his feet as he was talking. I thought he was a conman at the time]
Brian Kennedy present day: One of the detectives went out and took a statement from her, and then we got Melissa to draw a picture of the person that she remembered. 
Melissa Little: She had been in Praia da Luz about a week before the McCann's arrived and it was an odd thing to have somebody telling you this story about the orphaned British children. Why were they going to be in an orphanage in Portugal, for instance? Why weren't they immediately brought home by loving aunts and uncles or somebody? She later saw this man striding across the beach and it struck her that he was lingering, um, very closely near the creche. 
[2007 Gail Cooper: And it just felt quite...Well, creepy I suppose is...There was just something that didn't ring true about him]
Melissa Little present day: He looked gaunt, wild-eyed, his mouth open so she could see his...Large teeth, and the heavy moustache, the heavy eyebrows, that sort of thing. 
Brian Kennedy: It was pretty much across every Portuguese and English newspaper, the picture of this guy. 
[2007 Clarence Mitchell after holding up the Efit's of Gail Cooper's Orphanage collector man: If this man is pretty much anywhere in the Western world, we need to find him and find him quickly]
Brian Kennedy present day: It was shown to Jane Tanner and Jane Tanner felt there was an 80% likeness to the person she saw. Could we find this man that had these very distinct looks?
Robbyn Swan: The week before the McCann's arrived at the Ocean club, a family that was staying in the very apartment they rented had a similar encounter to Gail Cooper. The father of the family met with another charity collector, this one clean-cut and well spoken, and not terribly obtrusive or persistent, but he too was troubled by the fact that he didn't know anything about the orphanage being collected for or where it might be. 
Anthony Summers: And there was more. On the very day that Madeleine McCann disappeared, there were four more incidents of charity collectors collecting for an orphanage in the area of Praia da Luz. 
Robbyn Swan: We got in the car and started driving around, looking for what possibly could be an orphanage and having consulted various maps and talking to locals, we're coming up absolutely negative. 
Anthony Summers: We talked to the foundation based in the captital, Lisbon, about whether there had ever been an orphanage near Praia da Luz and they said there was nothing like that. So clearly, those men were commiting some sort of a crime, a mini deception. It may just have been a scam to get money. Maybe that's all they were, but the indications are, it may have been more than that. On one particular occasion, just before Madeleine disappeared, a man came to a house in Praia da Luz. The woman of the house, who was there with her little girl, became troubled because the man concerned was talking to her about orphanages, but not looking at her. He was looking off to the side and she realised he was staring fixedly at her little girl. The following day, the woman was upstairs doing the laundry and came down the stairs. There was the man again with her daughter. And as soon as she came down the stairs, the man ran away. 
Robbyn Swan: Perhaps of particular note in that case, the child involved was only three, just like Madeleine.
Julian Peribanez: For me, there was two lines of investigation. Only two. There was a single lone wolf that could have entered, taken Madeleine, and...Who knows? And the organised group of criminals. The window of opportunity, it's so small, so small for one person to take her. Surveillance on the apartment was easy. They knew their itinteraries, when they were getting up, when they were getting back. They acted on the perfect moment to get inside, take her, and leave without even leaving a trace. It gives you the idea that it was a well-organised group. I went to jail to see Joao Cipriano, the uncle of Joana. So we asked him about Madeleine, if he knew anything. But, um, he didn't give us any kind of information. 
Jorge Almeida: I exchanged some letters with Joao in Carregueira prison. ''It was my sister Leonor who told me Joana was fine.''
Julian Peribanez: We knew that his cellmate was, uh, just out of jail recently. So we thought it was gonna be a good idea to talk to him. 
[2007 Hidden camera surveillance footage with investigators and, Joao Cipriano's former cellmate. Male's voice in Portuguese: I know that he received quite a lot of money and he has a photo and a few more]
Julian Peribanez present day: He explained to us in this recording that he had seen, um, a picture of Joana taken after she was kidnapped. 
[2007 Hidden camera surveillance footage with investigators and, Joao Cipriano's former cellmate. Male's voice in Portuguese 1: You saw a photo of Joana? Yes, I did. He must have her there. In a room that is very...A room that is not from somewhere poor. Woman in Portuguese: We believe Joana is alive. Man 2: For me, from what I've seen, I have no doubt]
Julian Peribanez present day: Basically, Joana was still alive. 
Jorge Almeida: ''Leonor told me she had sold her to a foreign couple.'' There is no way we can prove if this is true or not. All we know is that Joana is still missing. 
Julian Peribanez: The uncle had confessed to him that, um, he had a lot of money and that he had sold the girl. The uncle was a drug addict. A person like that can do anything for money. We were talking about trying to gain access to that picture, but, um, after this meeting, he didn't want to talk to us anymore. 
[2007 Hidden camera surveillance footage with investigators and, Joao Cipriano's former cellmate. Male's voice in Portuguese 2: If I knew, I would have already told the police]
Julian Peribanez present day: He was afraid of two things. First, the persons that had Joana. And, uh, he was also really afraid of the Portuguese police. This was the biggest moment for me of the case 'cause it really give me proof that there was an organization working in Portugal, and it also gave us a hope of trying to find that network, uh...And after finding that network, we could find Madeleine.

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Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann' Empty Re: Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann'

Post by Jill Havern 16.04.19 11:16

NETFLIX TRANSCRIPT EPISODE 7:


Julian Peribanez: Madeleine was a very strange case because they never usually go after middle-class or upper-class people. They usually go for lower-class kids, third world countries. That's the main supplier of all these gangs. So my idea, it's that the value that Madeleine had was really high because if they took her, it's because they were gonna get a lot of money. Brian Kennedy, or the McCann's contracted Metodo 3. 
Brian Kennedy: Metodo 3 were passionate, fearless, focused,  and they attacked it. 
Julian Peribanez: Fransico Marco was the director of the agency. Fransico Marco was the director of the agency. He was my boss. This case for Metodo 3 was the biggest case they have done, ever. 
[Fransico Marco, director general of Metodo 3 2007:  We have the description of the woman and the man involved. Maddie was alive 2 days after the kidnapping. Madeleine was in a car and she was given to another person inside Portugal. I'm not saying we are maybe, no, no, no. We are very close to find the kidnapper]
Susan Hubbard present day: My phone started going off. There was unknown callers and my siblings trying to reach me. My kids were trying to reach me and I knew something had happened. 
Introduction music...
[Rogerio - I care about reality, not about fiction...]
[UK man's voice: The lies and untruths will be acted upon very rapidly]
The disappearance of Madeleine McCann
Episode 7....Truth and lies...
[Distant police sirens sound]
Investigation timeline
[2007-2008 picture appears on screen with the words ''Policia Judiciaria investigation'']
[2007-2007 words appear on screen ''McCann's hire Metodo 3'']
Julian Peribanez present day: I started working and getting into different chats and then different pages. And I started getting myself inside that world. These websites that are on the deep web, they are not indexed so nobody can find them. Basically, no one can access them if you're not a friend that trusts you and that gives you access to those websites. I tried to obtain anything related with Madeleine. And that's my final goal and my final question was that, was always, ''Do you know anything about Madeleine? Do you, have seen any videos? Do you...Have heard of any videos?'' Finally, I reach a person that had deep contacts inside that world. He sent me several videos, uh, files. Little by little, I was asking for more, for more, for more. What I was doing, the police usually, uh, works the same way. All the information that I was collecting, I was gonna share with the police. I went into the darkest places of the human being. I've seen things that I have to live with that all my life, that's things that you cannot forget or erase. 
Washington DC - United states of America.
Ernie Allen: In the early 2000s, the U.S governement created a tool to enable people to use the internet anonymously. It was to protect intelligence communications, to protect political dissidents, and journalists. What apparently nobody contemplated was that these same tools, would be used by paedophile online organisations, by human traffickers, by drug traffickers, by weapons traffickers, by terrorists organisations. 
Jim Gamble: There's a tsumani of indecent images online. Current estimates are in the UK alone, that 100,000 IP addresses, computer IP addresses, can be downloading indecent images of children at any given moment in time. 
Ernie Allen: In tragic cases like Madeleine McCann's, you should never rule out a commercial motive. 
Patricia De Sousa Cipriano: We have a very, very, safe country, but we cannot forget we are not alone in the world. We have the information that our country is used by traffickers to pass children to other countries. They enter the country through Algarve and then they go to Spain, to France, to Germany to be exploited. They have a very strong structure that allows them to move human beings from one country to another in a matter of hours. It's very easy. It's frightening because it is very easy. 
Jorge Almeida in Portuguese: Portugal's population knew there had been cases of child abuse and abductions that were sent to international paedophilia networks. There was a case called Casa Pia. The Joao Pedro case. It was a problem that worried society a lot.
Jim Gamble: It's the bogeyman, it's the fear factor. You've got to remember, there are paedophiles in every country and every country has it's story, the Beast of Belgium, you know and keeping children trapped for many years in cells that you build within your home. 
Homayra Sellier president of Innoconce in danger: The lead of Belgian paedophile network is also very possible. There are people who kidnap kids for the account of other people. This has happened over the years. On internet, on this topic, there are catalogues with children, with ages, blonde, this, that. They are on sale. What are the police doing? Why this is even possible? Why, when there is money missing from somebody who as a tax evasion status, everybody is on alert, we find the money, we find the person, we find everything. But when there are kids, there is no one. 
Ernie Allen: Human trafficking on the planet today is a $150-billion a year enterprise. While only two per cent of so-called dark websites are paedophile sites, they account for more than 80 per cent of dark web traffic. Infiltration is the primary investigative technique, but it is time-consuming, it's expensive, and one of the criteria for participation in these dark web groups is you have to provide images of children that nobody's ever seen before. 
Julian Peribanez: I had to comment with them, how good they were. It's like any kind of relationship, little by little, gaining the trust. It marks you or it changes your way of thinking about things, of course. 
224 Days missing...
[2007 U.S female reporter: Fransico Marco, a Spanish investigator hired by a supporter of the McCann's is making even more startling claims. Francisco Marco: We are very, very close to finding the kidnapper. Reporter: When pressed, Marco claimed he could say no more while working on the case. It's the kind of news the McCann's have heard before, but they're hopeful]
Julian Peribanez present day: The day that Francisco, director of Metodo 3, made his claim, the statement was, ''We know who took Madeleine, we know where she is, and we know how he did it.'' Francisco Marco didn't know anything about what was happening with the Madeleine McCann case. At the end, it was only me working on this, having a direct relation with Brian Kennedy. It was unbelievable. We didn't have a single clue. We didn't know who took her, where she was, nothing. I was ashamed of course. Uh, I was shocked and ashamed. It was a difficult situation and I knew Brian was really, really, really mad. Imagine you're the McCann's and you are home and you see that. The director of your private investigation says something like that. ''Where's Madeleine? Who took her?'' ''I don't know.'' That was his answer. That's the only answer he had. We had dinner, and I went outside with Francisco Marco for a cigarette, and he told me, ''The benefit that I'm gonna get from this, it's publicity.'' For him, this was business. This was uh, something good for his company. He didn't care about Madeleine McCann. Brian Kennedy got mad, the McCann's also asked for an explanation. 
Brian Kennedy: I know Metodo 3 said some silly things that they shouldn't have said. I lost the plot a bit towards the end and you can understand why. After months of looking, going down dead ends, you can understand why people lose the plot. I think the same happened to Metodo 3. 
Julian Peribanez: My ex-boss called me and he told me that Brian Kennedy wanted to stop working with Metodo 3 and that it was...It was over. 
Robbyn Swan: The McCann's were becoming frustrated so they contracted with an American company called Oakley international, who had a reputation as being among the big boys in investigations. They were promised all sorts of things, that the people that were working for Oakley were former FBI, CIA, and MI6, that they had the latest investigative tools, techniques, the technology available to them, that they could do all sorts of things that Metodo 3, their previous investigators, could not do. 
Patrick Kennedy:There come's a point where you decide to, ''Let's up the game a bit. Let's try and bring in someone...Someone else, someone who's gonna approach this from a different angle.''
Brian Kennedy: So we took them on for a very expensive contract, part-paid them, and they went about their business. 
Richard Parton, freelance voice analyst hired by Oakley international: I found out about the case from a mutual friend and he says, ''Expect a call from Kevin.'' Kevin Halligen was the president and head of Oakley international. In fact he, personified Oakley. Everyone, even his partners, recognised Kevin was Oakley. It's common that you code name your project, you code name, uh, certain suspects. One of the code names used was Project Omega. Kevin had access to a dream team that would impress the daylights out of you. Top in their field. They had skills. 
Patrick Kennedy: They certainly did have experience. Oakley were more secretive, you know, A lot more kind of secret agent kind of stuff, you know. 
[Male U.S Anchor man interview with Richard Parton 1: We've all heard of polygraphs of lie detectors. How about a truth detector that tells investigators a lot more than you say? Richard Parton to another male: Uh, the last vaction you took?]
Richard Parton present day: Essentialy, the technology is computer-based and it listens to the frequencies of the voice. 
[U.S Woman in a news studio interview with Richard Parton 2: And you asked me at one point, about my shoes and I said, ''Oh yeah, they were a really great deal,'' and it showed up as innacurate]
Richard Parton present day: I did several analyses for him, conducting interviews and recording them, and I analysed suspects. 
[Richard Parton replying to the female anchor in the same interview about her shoes: When you said you wear them a lot, you're using a commonly understood language that people know what you mean, but you know what the true meaning of the language is and to your mind, that was an innacurate statement. And we can see down to five levels of your subconscious.
 [Richard Parton Interview 2: I can see if they're thinking from their memory or their imagination]
Richard Parton present day: As well as whether your statement is deceptive. 
[U.S woman interview 2: Richard Parton thanks very much, and we would just like to say, Headline news, of course, does not endorse any of the technology we showcase, we just bring you some of the latest things that are out there]
Patrick Kennedy: I remember feeling a little bit sceptical about them and, you know, they were checked out. Ultimately, it wasn't my decision on who we brought in. 
Praia da Luz - Portugal...
Robbyn Swan: Things seemed to be going well. Oakley had set up a hotline to accept tips. They had people on the ground in Praia da Luz, good people who were working hard and trying to develop contacts. Oakley sat down with an Irishman named Martin Smith and his family, who had been witnesses in Praia da Luz on the night of Madeleine's disappearance who, around 10pm that evening, had seen a man carrying a little girl wearing pyjamas in the street not far from the Ocean club. 
Richard Parton: This is an interview that was conducted with the Smith's in August. The reason that their time is important is that it hasn't changed. Maybe it's because they had a few of them that noticed this event all together. 
Robbyn Swan: What they did was sent in their police sketch artist, um, e-fits or identikit sketches of the man they saw, and these are now in circulation still as the sighting of a man of potential interest. 
Richard Parton: Oakley also had Jane Tanner's description and the Cooperman sketch.  Oakley began a manhunt in the area and came up with some other suspects who had similar appearance to the drawings that came from each persons description. They interviewed them, some they released, but one man they tracked back to a van. I do remember Kevin was mentioning that, uh, they were tracking a van on of the suspects that was seen in PDL that night, they had tracked him to where he's living in a van and they had, um, all kinds of surveillance on this individual. 
1 Year missing
[2008 UK female reporter: Looking exhausted but resolute, Kate and Gerry McCann retuned with their three-year-old twins to the Liverpool church where they married to mark the one-year anniversary of the day a light went out for their family]
[2008 UK Male reporter: The mother of Madeleine McCann has sent a message of thanks to the people of Praia da Luz in Portugal on the anniversary of her daughters disappearance]
[Video shows Trish Cameron coming out of PDL church, alongside Haynes Hubbard, she is holding lots of green and yellow balloons. John McCann and other family members are there in front of a crowd and press. [Michael Wright speaks: Where there is good in the world, let us unite. Where there is strength, let us be giants in the face of darkness. Where there is hope, let our hearts long for Madeleine's return] They release the balloons]
[2008 UK male reporter: Cleared as suspects, the investigation shelved, the parents of Madeleine McCann say they're relieved to be cleared of any involvement of their daughters disappearance]
[2008 Male news anchor in Portuguese: The decision has been reached tha Kate and Gerry McCann and Robert Murat's arguido status will be lifted...]
1 year 79 Days missing
[Kate and Gerry McCann giving a press conference in a manor type house. They sit at a large desk with Clarence Mitchell sitting on a chair to their right. Kate McCann: We welcome the news today, though it is no cause for celebration. It's hard to describe how utterly despairing it was to be named arguido and subsequently portrayed in the media as suspects in our own daughters abduction]
Rogerio Alves present day: When the prosecutor decided not to charge them, both Policia Judiciaria and the prosecutors said that there was nothing against the mother and the father.
[2008 Kate McCann same press conference: We look forward to scrutinising the police filesto see what has actually been done and, more importantly, what can be done as we leave no stone unturned in the search for our little girl]
Rogerio Alves present day: For me, it was of course a victory and a joy. My mission is accomplished here. 
[2008 Female UK reporter: Madeleine McCann's parents are expected to be given access to the official police files on their daughters disappearance by the end of this week]
[2008 BBC News UK female anchor: Kate and Gerry McCan and a third Briton, Robert Murat, are no longer formal suspects in the investigation and Portuguese officials say they are now shelving the case]
Robbyn Swan present day: The prosecuters in the case said they'd suffered enough. The disappearance of a child was not a mystery novel. It wasn't a Sherlock Holmes. At that point, they said they were going to stop the investigation until such a time that more productive lines of enquiry might be developed. With that, they shelved the case and the arguido status that had hung over Gerry and Kate McCann and Robert Murat was lifted. 
Robert Murat: Just over there is where I, in 2007, was brought for the first time to the PJ in that building over there. I spent 19 hours. It was a long, painful day. I was in a world of my own I suppose. It was just absolutely...Uh, Uh, Um, I didn't know what was going on. I had abslutely no idea what was going on in my life at that time. After being dropped off, I had to climb the wall here and then get back into the house because the front of the property was covered in journalists. 
[2007 Reporter speaking in Portuguese]
[2007 Overlapping camera's going off and reporters chatter]
Robert Murat present day: It was horrible being completely constrained inside this house. We had people trying to climb over the fences and walls and helicopters over the top. When the case was closed and the arguido status was lifted, I felt that it would make a big difference, um, and it didn't. Having the words of something being lifted is one thing. Actually having something firm and final is something else. And that wasn't firm and final. That was just closing a case because they hadn't--Not closing the case because they had discovered the truth. 
182 days missing...
[2008 A man's voice in English: Mr Amaral is publishing a book to make money and all of this publicity surriounding it...]
[2008 Female reporter in Portuguese: Two weeks, three editions sold out. A fourth now available. Many interested in reading in Portugal and the United Kingdom alike]
Goncalo Amaral present day: The book I wrote was a defence of a number of attacks. I was called so many things--Incompetent, drunkard, fat, and so on. And during that time, I appealed to the National director of Policia Judiciaria to defend my team and me. And this didin't happen so that's when I made the decision to write the book. 
[2008 Female reporter in Portuguese: Whether it's truth or lies, this is now a matter of public knowledge]
Rogerio Alves present day: Usually when they ask me about the books of Goncalo Amaral, my answer is always the same. ''I care about reality, not fiction.'' 
Jim Gamble: To write a book for your own personal gain, you know, for your own personal fame and celebrity, which maligns and directly accuses individuals of being guilty of a crime, is simply not on. A single theory about it being the parents is unprofessional and in my opinion, and it's only my opinion, unforgivable. 
Goncalo Amaral: The evidence that the child very likely died in that apartment, as a result of an accident, a domestic accident, and that the body doesn't turn up, the cadaver is concealed. 
[2008 Female reporter in Portuguese speaking to locals about Amaral's book. To a Portuguese lady: What do you believe happened to the little girl? Portuguese lady 1 answers: I think she was killed. Male local In Portuguese to the same reporter as he claps his hands: A round of applause for Mr Amaral. Female reporter in Portuguese: What for? Male local in Portuguese: Because he figured it all out. Portuguese lady 2: Almost one year and two months and we still can't reach any conclusion]
[Goncalo Amaral - The truth of the lie documentary - 2009 - TVI. Shows people watching Amaral's documentary as his voice says ''My name is Goncalo Amaral. I've been an investigator with the Policia Judiciaria for 27 years. I coordinated the investigation into the disappearance of Madeleine McCann on the 3rd May 2007]
Susan Hubbard present day: I watched Goncalo Amaral's The truth of the lie, the night it was aired in Portugal with some Portuguese friends. There was a big anticipation that The truth of the lie was coming out on television. Lots of people were watching it. 
[Narrator on the 'Truth of the lie' documentary in Portuguese: According to the testimony of the Ocean club's manager...When the GNR patrol arrived on location, the childs father threw himself at the officers feet, like a praying Arab completely out of control over his daughters disappearance. The same scene was repeated, according to the officers, in the couples bedroom. [Actor's voice playing Gerry: Oh, God!] 
Goncalo Amaral present day: No, I don't have that scene in the book of having knelt and prayed. It's an exaggeration. Apart from that, it's pretty well produced and overall factual. 
[Goncalo Amaral on the truth of the lie documentary: What I know tells me that Madeleine McCann died in apartment 5a on 3rd May 2007. The investigation was brutally interupted and a political and hurried archiving took place]
Rogerio Alves present day: If you connect them with the fact that, ''Oh, Uh, our police has suffered pressure from the British police just to help the McCann's,'' Et cetera, you are creating--Let me tell you a story. One day, I was in my office and I receive a call, a telephone call from a journalist, and he asked me to confirm. ''Is it true that there was a meeting between you and the British Ambassador to avoid that Goncalo Amaral could run for mayor in a small village in the Algarve?'' 
Goncalo Amaral: Gerry McCann came here to meet with the leader of the Social democrats. putting pressure on them to deny me to become a candidate. And in the end, I was not a candidate because the party denied me. 
Rogerio Alves: ''Yes, it's true. And in that same meeting were also the Batman, uh, and Superman and the Flinstones. They are all there.'' 
[2009 The tuth of the lie documentary. Narrator in Portuguese: The mystery still persists. The former inspector believes that someday, the truth will be known]
Susan Hubbard present day: When the film finished, I felt totally deflated. I was like, ''Half the countries watched tonight.'' I thought, ''That's it, we've lost the general population's support.'' Yeah. 
[2009 female UK reporter in English: A brand new billboard poster of Madeleine with ''Help me,'' In Portuguese has been splatterd with pain]
Susan Hubbard present day: The stop sign just down from our home and underneath, they spray painted, ''The McCann's,'' like, ''Stop the McCann's.'' 
[2009 UK man on camera: I live here so I just wish it'd go away, to be honest [Shrugs] 'Cause it's...It's no good for us.]
[2009 Local Portuguese man in English: If they don't--can't find, why they have to...To keep searching?]
Susan Hubbard present day: People have sympathy for only so long, and then it stops. People just get tired. They get tired of grief and they get tired of not knowing. 
Jim Gamble: You have a professional like Amaral who actually feeds, feeds what's going on. What you basically do is you close down the search for Madeleine. You close down the eyes and ears of the public or the minds of the public because you say, ''Look, I was in a position to know. This is who did it,'' so we all stop looking. And then we simply begin to focus on this miscarriage of justice because the right people aren't being held to account. 
[2009 Clarence Mitchell: Mr Amaral needs to be we aware that the libel lawyers who are representing Kate and Gerry are examining every word that he is saying in his book and they will not hesitate from taking action, legal action against Mr Amaral. Any lies, any untruths, any defamation will be acted upon...]
Susan Hubbard present day: It was so important for Kate and Gerry to have the judicial system in Portugal say, ''There's no proof of this.'' 
[2009 Male news anchor in Portuguese: The trial opposing the McCann couple began this morning. Maddie's parent's call for the destruction of all copies of the book, The truth of the lie, authord by the former inspector who investigated the case. They also demand that Goncalo Amaral be prevented from carrying on with his accusations.]
[2009 Press conference Gerry McCann and Clarence Mitchell Sat at a desk. Gerry addresses the press: Mr Amaral's central thesis has no evidence whatsover to support it. To claim as he did, that Madeleine is dead, and that we, her parents, were somehow involved in her disappearance,  has caused our family incredible distress and continues to do so]
Susan Hubbard present day: They can take the character damning that it was, they could stand up to that, but if people in Portugal actually believe Goncalo Amaral's book, then they won't be looking for Madeleine.
[2009 Gerry McCann to a reporter in the airport: Well, we're just here to continue the search for Madeleine and to protect our own family and their human rights and I think it's fairly clear, you know. No one should be allowed to say that our daughter cannot be found without very good evidence to the contrary, and that's what the court case is about]
Susan hubbard present day: So they had to get the book off the shelf. They had to fight. 
[2009 Goncalo Amaral to the press: The McCann's are the ones who should have had a different attitude]
[2009 Gerry McCann getting impatient with the press outside the courts in Lisbon: There is no evidence that Madeleine is dead. That is what you heard yesterday didn't you. You heard that, didn't you? UK Male supporter: This is just raking up old ground, isn't it Gerry? Gerry McCann: No, no. Today [Clears throat] we are here-- UK Male reporter interupts: But the police... Gerry McCann cuts in aggressively: - No no,  hang on. They're not raking it up, This is a legal...]
[2009 Reporter to Goncalo Amaral outside the Lisbon courts still too: ...Are you satisfied-- Goncalo Amaral: All those--Allow me to just finish. All those people who laboured away from their homes and families--They've never heard a word of thanks]
[2009 Gerry McCann continuing to say to the press outside Lisbon court: This is a legal process which we are going through. UK male Reporter: There's nothing new being said by the police, is it? Gerry McCann: Of course there's not]
[2009 Female reporter to Goncalo Amaral in Portuguese: What do you expect from this hearing? Goncalo Amaral: For justice to be done. Now it's up to the courts to decide]
2009 - A judge rules to ban further sales and publication of Goncalo Amaral's book and documentary The truth of the lie. A Portuguese court of appeal eventually overturns the ban. 
Robbyn Swan present day: The police investigation had been closed down. So, Brian Kennedy was principally funding the McCann's investigation at that point. Over time, things started to filter back to the McCann's which seemed odd. 
Brian Kennedy: The trust got tired of the continuous invoices they were sending and they were not making the progress they'd promised to make. 
Richard Parton: Kevin did what he usually does. He throws out juicy tidbits and things that would inspire hope. Kevin told Brian Kennedy that because of his work with U.S intelligence that he had access to satellite photos of Portugal on the night Madeleine went missing, and that he could access those spy photos and be able to see if there's any suspects in the area, maybe see what happened. 
Robbyn Swan: When they were finally produced, they were only google images of the town. Um, so it was all a bit of a--A terrible let down. 
Brian Kennedy: We had nothing and we're still looking for the child, so you can understand why we'd say if somebody comes in and says, ''Look, we can do this and we can do that and we can reveal these GPS satellite pictures of the particular evening 'cause we have a link with the FBI that will give us all of this information.'' You listen because where else is there to go?
Robbyn Swan: Brian Kennedy started getting complaints that people weren't being paid, and he was deeply concerned by the things he was hearing back. 
Richard Parton: Kevin told me and other people that he sent a team in, a man and a woman team, with a similar child to the age of Madeleine and put the kid up as bait. He said at one time, he had a--a drunken priest uh, undercover. When I think of credible intelligence-gathering tools, my mind immediately jumps to, ''Where's my drunken priest?'' What he said just didn't make sense. Yeah, the van guy didn't do it. He had been cleared. And, uh, neither did anyone else that looked like that that they found in the area. There's very little evidence that he did what he said he did. Kevin's only effort was to create a report 
Brian Kennedy. Halligen had started to become threatening, threatening to do this about the family, and say this about the family and expose stuff, just an absolute nonsense. 
Robbyn Swan: Then it emerged that the tips coming into the hotline weren't actually being answered or acted upon. 
Richard Parton: I had the opportunity to sit with kevin several times and we talked about his relationships. We talked about his alleged background. None of these elements were consistent. I have a vast number of people who are vouching for this man, but nothing is matching up. And at that moment, everything, everything came into focus. He was a fraud. People think we're talking about an investigation of a missing child. We're not. You're talking about a conman. You're not talking about an investigation. In fact, he hopped on a flight to Rome. My reaction to him skipping out without paying? Not happy. No, he wasn't gonna run. I used every known associate he had, every resource available to track him. I had hired staff in, uh, the UK just to dig into his past life. 
Robbyn Swann: Halligen was revealed to be a grotesque fraud. He was really an Irishman who had been largly masquerading, um, as an investigator. Um, he had set up a bogus marriage for himself, even though he was already married. He had made friends with the Washington elite, and was living the high life off the back of what seemed to be the money in the search for Madeleine. 
Richard Parton: His intelligence credentials were fraudulent, his birthdate is fraudulent. In some respect it was easy to find him when he changed hotels because Kevin loved accumlating, uh, hotel reward points so the search became easier and easier. He sent me what he considered to be a threat. He sent me the lyrics of, ''Ganster paradise.'' and it was funny because this is who he sees himself as being. 
Brian Kennedy: Oakley had ended in tears. Clearly... Clearly an unscrupulous character he had proven to be over the months. 
Robbyn Swan: Kevin Halligen was convicted of fraud in another case and spent time in prison in the United States. He eventually died of a brain haemorrhage in 2018. 
Richard Parton: The ultimate victims have to be Madeleine and her family. This is almost a year's worth of hope. I just can't begin to understand the pain. That the McCann's must be feeling. [Tears come to Richard's eyes] 
Julian Peribanez: And It's surprising how unlucky they were on choosing the people for their investigations. 
Robbyn Swan: There were, in this case, just an extroadinary of such--what seemed to us--bizarre instances of people trying to involve themselves in this case. For 18 months, not police agency anywhere had been actively searching for Madeleine. To the McCann's, that was horrendous and it was totally unacceptable. 
[2009 U.S News anchor: There was a surprise announcement in London this morning of a possible break in the long-running search for little Madeleine McCann]
[2009 Clarence Mitchell to the press at a conference: The witness became aware of a well-dressed woman who he described as being agitated]
Anthony Swan present day: 2 years after Madeleine disappeared, private detectives working for the McCann's brought forward an incident that had only recently emerged. A British citizen, an executive, had come forward to remember that at two o'clock in the morning, shortly after Madeleine disappeared he had been in Barcelona and he had been approached by a woman, um, who said to him, ''Have you come to deliver my new daughter? Have you come to deliver my new daughter? Have you got the child?'' She asked him three times, then realised he wasn't the man that she thought he was and walked away. 
[2009 Clarence Mitchell, same press conference: The witness has described the woman as, in the witness's own words, ''A bit of a Victoria Beckham lookalike,'' She spoke in English with what the witness has described as possibly an Australian accent. This conversation was potentially significant to the investigation into Madeleine's disappearance]
[2009 UK Male reporter: A British man has provided an e-fit of a woman...]
Robbyn Swan present day: Two former detectives, David Edgar and Arthur Cowley, were the last private investigators hired to work on the case. They handed over their work to the MET, highlighting what seemed to them signifcant leads. 
Anthony Summers: But perhaps the most telling sighting of all is that of a woman called Carol Tranmer, who had been out to see her aunt who was living in the apartment immediately above the McCann's. Carole was looking out of the window. I'd like to quote it directly. She said, ''Looking down below the McCann flat, I saw someone come out of the ground floor apartment, closing the gate very carefully and quietly. It looked very strange to me. He looked to one side and the other, shut the gate and walked very quickly below us.'' This is on the afternoon of the day Madeleine is going to disappear. What had struck her as peculiar, she said, ''Was the way the man had closed the little gate down there. It was his furtiveness that got my attention. The man had moved stealthily, as if he didn't want anyone to know he was coming and going.'' That has to be significant in any investigation of this case. 
[End: Theme music playing]

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Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann' Empty Re: Netflix transcript: 'The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann'

Post by Jill Havern 16.04.19 11:17

NETFLIX TRANSCRIPT EPISODE 8:


London United Kingdom
Louis Charalmbous, Lawyer for Robert Murat: I took a phone call and I was asked, would I represent Robert Murat and I immediately said, ''Yes.'' Robert was the ultimate good samaritan. But a good samaritan who was mugged.
[An acted out clip of a Murat actor speeding in the car, being interrogated by the PJ]
[2007 UK Male reporter in English: This is the third time this property has been searched inside and out]
Louis Charalmbous present day: It was like talking to someone who had just come off a battlefield. 
[2007 Female reporter in Portuguese: They follow this lead--Of a potential paedophile with no criminal record, an English paedophile living here in Praia da Luz]
Robert Murat present day: I was a mess, an absolute mess. I was in no fit state, um, to--To deal with any of it, really.
Louis Charalmbous: He was bewildered, but knew that he had to try and restore his reputation and get the truth out. 
Robert Murat: I wanted to hide. I needed to contfront it, but actually confronting it is quite a difficult job to do. 
Louis Charalmbous: He was taking on 11 newspapers and one TV news broadcaster. He was taking on more than anyone I'd come across in modern times. And within a space of a few weeks, we had a list of 92 articles, which contained at least one of the seven lies that were told about Robert. Those lies fell in four categories. One, that Murat was a paedophile. Two, that he'd been involved in the abduction of Madeleine McCann. Three, that he'd told lies to the police. And four, that Robert displayed tendencies like Ian Huntley, the Soham double murderer. All those allegations were baseless and false. 
[2008 UK Female reporter: Robert Murat emerged from the High Court with his legal team, who'd helped him secure £600,000 in damages]
Louis Charalmbous present day: To have been catapulted into, at one time, being the most famous murder suspect in the world is something that none of us can really imagine. 
[2008 Robert Murat, a woman and Louis outside the high courts as Press are taking photo's. UK male voice: Robert! Straight over here, mate]
Louis Charalmbous present day: You generally don't get more than about £300,000 for libel and he got more than double that. It was good in terms of damages, but more important was the extent of the apologies. 
[2008 Robert Murat reading from a piece of paper to the press still outside the High court speaking: Today's statement of a full apology in open court means I can emerge from this action vindicated. Swamped by the press Robert and his team walk through the crowd away]
Louis Charalmbous present day: We'd decided that we wouldn't take questions. We had a car waiting for us, surrounded by more photographers. I remember actually that one very keen paparazzi opened the door of our cab, undid the window, slammed the door shut, and then poked the lens into our faces so he could get the closest shot of us. Robert and I just looked and said, ''Well, there you go.'' 
Robert Murat: I actually thought I would feel absolutely fantastic about it, as it came to be. But no. The situation was the same. That child hadn't been found. 
[Introduction music]
Jim Gamble: It's about hope. And hope is the fuel that keeps people going. 
The disappearance of Madeleine McCann - Episode 8 - Somebody knows.
 [2008 UK female news anchor BBC: Seven friends who were on holiday in Portugal with Kate and Gerry McCann when their daughter Madeleine vanished last year have received substantial libel damages from Express Newspapers. The group received a total of £375,000 after newspapers claimed that they may have helped cover facts concerning the three-year-old's disappearance. The money will be donated to the Find Madeleine fund]
[2008 Fiona Payne stood with David Payne, Diane Webster, Matthew Oldfield, Rachael Mamphilly Oldfield. Fiona Payne speaking to the press: Although we are very pleased with today's result, It changes little when Madeleine's plight remains ongoing]
[2008 Male UK reporter: The McCann's are continuing their own investigations. The fund to pay for that now has an extra £375,000. In March, Express Newspapers apologised to Kate and Gerry McCann for false stories published about them]
Kelvin  Mackenzie present day: I don't believe for one single second that they have ever had anything to do with it. They've paid a price. It's, um, quite, quite wrong. Quite wrong. Although there is no earthly reason why I should feel particularly friendly towards the McCann's since he has spent most of his time in the last few years trying to curtail the powers of the press. But, let's move on from that.
[2011 UK male News anchor: Good evening. The parents of Madeleine McCann have presented their evidence to the Leveson enquiry which is investigating the standards of British newspapers]
[2011 UK male reporter: Lord Justice Leveson's enquiry team began it's investigation into what went wrong in the media and how to put it right. The News Of the World, obtained a copy of Kate McCann's private diary, probably from the Portuguese police. It published it without telling her]
[2011 Kate McCann speaking in Leveson: I felt totally violated. I'd written these words and thoughts at the most desperate time in my life. Most people won't have to experience that and it wa my only way of communicating with Madeleine. And for me, you know, there was absolutely no respect shown for me as a grieving mother or as a human being. Photographers would either spring out from behind a hedge to give, I guess, a startled look that they could attach, I don't know, ''Fragile,'' ''Furious,'' Whatever they wanted to put with their headline. Um, but there were several occasions where they would bang on the windows, sometimes with camera lenses, and, you know, Amelie said to me several times, ''Mummy, I'm scared.'' Gerry McCann: A system has to be put in place to protect ordinary people from the damage that the media can cause]
[2011 Peter Hill The Express Newspaper at Leveson: This was an unprecidented story that in my 50 years of my experience, I can't remember the like. We published many, many stories, um, of all kinds about the McCann's, many stories that were deeply sympathetic to them, some stories that were not. Male lawyer chuckles: Yes, but the stories that were not were a little bit more than unsympathetic. Some of them went as far as to accuse them of killing their child, didn't they? Peter Hill: There was reason to believe that they might possibly be true. Male Lawyer: So that was a sufficient basis? ''Reason to believe that they might possibly be true so we'll whack it in the newspaper.'' That's true isn't it? Peter Hill: I don't use expressions like, ''Whack it in the paper.'' I find that to be a very judgemental expression. Male lawyer: Yes, well, okay, I...I--I--Well, I don't actually apologize for it. I'm going to carry on]
[2011 Male lawyer to Kelvin Mackenzie: Now, Mr Mackenzie, you were editor of The sun, between 1981 and 1994. Kelvin Mackenze: Correct. Mm-Hmm. Male lawyer: Well, you said in your seminar, ''Basically, my view, is that if it sounded right, it was probably right, and therefore we should, lob it in,'' Do you stand by--By that, Mr Mackenzie? Kelvin Mackenzie: Yes, I do. I suppose what it comes down to is the verb ''To lob,'' Male lawyer: Yes. Kelvin Mackenzie: Which I would say, If you analyse it, I--I looked it up on...Uh, I looked it up on the online dictionary and it says, ''To throw in a slow arc,'' Which I think is probably preferable to another verb, which would be, ''To chuck it in,'' Lord Leveson: I just wonder whether it merely looking right is a sufficient test of accuracy. Kelvin Mackenzie: Okay, so journalists try to get things right. People tell you lies. Sometimes they think it's the truth and then you get a phone call the following day and somebody says, ''That's completely wrong, they weren't there.'' Lord Levenson: Getting facts right, of course, is a difficult exercise, but that's not an excuse for not having a go. Kelvin Mackenzie: No, I agree. I agree, and I may have misphrased that slightly, not a lot, to be honest, not a lot]
Kelvin Mackenzie present day: The problem with journalism, it takes out the natural emotion out of you. Regardless of what you think, this is a commercial animal. Your job is to serve the reader. The reader is fascinated by this story, therefore it becomes a major front-page story and stays so. This isn't something that has ever gone away. Which is something the politicians know which is why they continue to write the check to try and get to the bottom of it. 
Alan Johnson British Home Secretary 2009-2010:  The McCann's asked to see me. So I said I would see them. The home secretary position is one of the great offices of state. You are responsible for policing, counter-terrorism, and immigration. In America, they would have called it the department for inland security. The McCann's argument was very clear and very powerful. This is a British child. She may have disappeared in Portugal, but she is a British responsibility. And basically they wanted responsibility for dealing with this to be passed to Scotland yard, to the Metropolitan police. There was a feeling that we were being dragged into something that... would just increase expectation without being able to deliver anything, that it would damage our relationship with Portugal. Once I'd thought it over, I thought, ''There's one man who can help me with this and that's Jim Gamble.'' 
[2010 Jim Gamble speaking to a reporter with behind him a Portuguese looking age progression photo of Madeleine McCann: The idea behind this 60 second...]
Alan Johnson present day: Jim Gamble was an amazingly impressive person.
[2010 Jim Gamble's voice carries over Alan's:...To an individual person]
Jim Gamble present day: We called it ''The scoping review'' The officials were fundamentaly opposed to it and as--as forthright in that as they could be. Alan Johnson just cut straight through that in a way I've never seen any government official do before...Incidently the opposition supporting it as well, then we went to...
Alan Johnson: Here were the parents who'd been through so much fire and brimstone and so much unfair criticism...And they were asking for a bit of help. Uh, pfft. It's a no-brainer really. 
[2010 UK Male reporter: They have asked for help to find their daughter before, but tonight, in an open letter to the Prime Minister, Kate and Gerry's raw frustration is clear]
[2010 Kate and Gerry McCann at a press conference promoting Kate's Book ''madeleine''. Gerry McCann: No law enforcement agency or police force has been looking for Madeleine for three years. We've been doing it on our own and we're taking this opportunity today along with the open letter to the Prime Minister to ask the public to once again help us like they did...]
Alan Johnson present day: Unfortunately, the scoping report came just as the general election took place, so I was no longer Home Secretary and nothing much seemed to happen, and then The Sun picked up the campaign. And then there was that powerful open letter. Suddenly, we got the right result.
[2010 The Sun newspaper headline flashes on screen. Open up the Maddie files. Then a second. David Cameron Prime Minister responds newspaper headline. I've reopened  the Maddie files]
Anthony Summers present day: May 2011, the then Prime Minister, David Cameron decided there should be a review of the case by Scotland Yard, and this review was to be called, Operation grange. 
[2011 David Cameron: This was a crime that touched the heart of everyone in the country and everyone would like to see it resolved]
Sir Paul Stephenson, commissioner 2009-2011 The Metropolitan Police:  I distinctly remember asking this question. Uh, ''Do we believe there are extant, um, lines of enquiry that we can bring our special expertise to?'' And once they said to me, ''Yes.'' there are likely to be viable lines of enquiry that we can bring special value to, that would satisfy my criteria, and it certainly did.
Operation grange, 2011 - Present
[2011 Andy Redwood Detective chief inspector, Operation grange, Metropolitan police surrounded by press]
Anthony Summers present day: The man leading the new review of the Madeleine McCann case was Detective chief inspector, Andy Redwood. 
[2013 Andy Redwood to an interviewer: Primarily, what we sought to do from the beginning is try and draw everything back to zero, if you like. Try and sort of...]
Anthony Summers present day: And in the real sense, he was the right man for a job. He'd specialised in cold cases. What he embarked on was having his team of 30 pore over the enormous documentation that had been collected by the Portuguese over the years. So, real investigation, at last, began again. 
Robbyn Swan: The Portuguese began to receive letters of request from their British colleagues to cooperate on aspects of the investigation. They decided that they too should reopen their investigation and so a team was put together, none of which were involved in the original investigation. 
[2013 UK male reporter 1 as video shows an arial view of PDL fields: This morning, officers taped off an area of this scrubland outside Praia da Luz and set to work. Just one small patch, perhaps 100 square meters, in the middle of all of this. Something within their investigation had drawn a possible link between this precise spot and the disappearance of Madeleine McCann. For eight long days, DCI Andy Redwood led his team on the Algarve. They searched hard, but found nothing]
[2013 UK male reporter 2 as an acted out video of Jane Tanner's ''Sighting'' on the 3rd May 2007, is shown: One of the most pivotal events on the timeline was Jane Tanner's sighting of a man carrying a child]
[2013 Andy Redwood speaking on UK's Crimewatch programme: One of the things that we picked up very quickly was the fact there was a night creche. It was operating from the Ocean club Main reception and eight families had left 11 children in there and one particular family we spoke to, they themselves believed that they could be the Tanner sighting]
[2013 Julian Totman MSM news story was Tannerman according to Andy Redwood and Operation Grange]
Melissa Little present day: Well, of course I naturally hoped that my drawing would lead the lovely McCann's to their daughter. But that was not meant to be. 
[2013 UK Male reporter: This is the actual photograph taken by Metropolitan police officers of the man dressed in the kind of clothes he wore on holiday. This image was compared to the artists impression]
[2013 Andy Redwood on UK's Crimewatch: It is uncannily similar. Male UK interviewer: But it's interesting--]
Melissa Little present day: It is like him, isn't it? Male UK Interviewer: Yeah, it's a perfect rendition. Melissa Little: Really? [Chuckles] Well, you see, I've never been told that. Interviewer: He was carrying his own child. Melissa Little: And presumably 'cause they're British tourists, he quite likely has got the pyjamas from Marks & Sparks or something, just like the McCann's may have done. 
[2013 Andy Redwood on UK's Crimewatch as a the pair of pyjamas photo that were Amelie's shown in 2007 that the McCann's said were like Madeleine's when she went missing, is shown on the screen: We know the pyjamas that their child was wearing, that it is again, uncannily striking, the similarities. We believe that it's really significant, that from 9:15, we're able to allow the clock to continue to move foreward, and in doing so, things that may not have been quite as significant, or received quite the same degree of attention are now the centre of focus. What we're bringing today to the public is a revision of the timeline in terms of emphasis]
Anthony Summers present day: Discounting Jane Tanner's sighting as Scotland yard has suggested, may mean that the check on apartment A by the McCann's friend Matt Oldfield at about 9:30 has great significance. 
Robbyn Swan: About 9:05, Gerry got up from the table to make the first check on his own children. 
Anthony Summers: At 9:25 Matt Oldfield went to check on the children on behalf of the parents. He peered into the McCann's children's room, but didn't go in. He said he saw there was some light, indicating that perhaps a window shutter which had been closed was now likely somewhat open, and though the door had been left almost closed by Madeleine's father on his earlier visit, Oldfield now noticed that the door was half-open and he heard a noise in there, um, which he thought was just the noise of somebody turning over in bed, perhaps, and then he went away. But is it possible that the sound Oldfield heard and the likelihood that the shutter was open indicated that an abductor was at that very moment in the childrens room? Or did Oldfield's check perhaps occur just after a kidnapper had left, likely through the window onto the car park, taking Madeleine with him? 
London United Kingdom
Anthony Summers: In 2013, Operation grange were well into their work. They were sending letters of request for information to 31 countries about the use of mobile phones in and around the time that Madeleine had disappeared. 
[2013 Clarence Mitchell to a reporter: Kate and Gerry remain very grateful to the Metropolitan police for the fantastic work that Operation Grange continues to do]
Anthony Summers present day: They would talk about already having done 2000 actions and that they had more than twice that number still to be done. 
[2013 Andy Redwood: At the moment, we have identified 195 investigative opportunities. UK woman Crimewatch UK interviewer: Andy, another aspect that seems to me very important are all these sightings of...It might be the same fair-haired man, might be a different fair-haired man... Andy Redwood: Well, there is a number of incidents on either--On both the day that Madeleine went missing and in days leading up to her disappearance where one man or two were seen lurking around the apartments. Now, there may be a completely innocent explanation for that, but we really need the public to help us to identify who these men are]
Robbyn Swan present day: There appear to be individuals, uh, who had been seen by witnesses lurking around the McCann's apartment that week. A young girl of only 12 had spotted a man leaning against the wall very near Apartment 5A. He was thin, light-haired, had a badly pockmarked face, she thought. Another woman staying at the Ocean club that week spotted a man who she described in a very similar way, a man with a badly...Ugly, pockmarked skin lurking around the road outside the McCann's apartment. 
[2013 UK Female reporter: Police in the UK are now appealing to any other families who may have had similar incidents on their holiday's to get in touch, whether they'd previously reported them or not]
Jayne Jenson present day: If you were looking from the tapas bar, our apartment was on the far left-hand side and  the McCann's was the last  apartment on the right-hand side. On that Thursday, my sister and I were walking down here. [A clip shows the path in between the apartment buildings and a wall to the tapas bar] Annie was--She was just walking slightly in front of me and then she stopped and looked back at me and motioned with her head [chuckles] And it was here we saw the two men. I caught up with my sister and said, ''What was that about?'' And she said, ''Well, two single blonde men on their own!'' Um...[Chuckles] Which just made me chuckle, but they wre wrongly placed. And that was that, until later that day when we had heard Madeleine was taken. It was only then, piecing back, ''Who were these guys?'' It was clear that nobody was living in the apartment at the time or it wasn't rented out. There were leaves on the terrace and, you know, the general closed up for the winter look. But when the chaps were there, the gate was slightly ajar and the leaves were exactly where they were, the curtains were drawn exactly how they were. So they hadn't come through the front door, which was obviously on the other side where the car park is. So they had to have come up through the gate and onto the terrace. Because I knew subsequently, obviously, is from that terrace, you can look straight over the wall into the Ocean club swimming pool area and Tapas bar. When I was back in the UK, by then, the Find Madeleine helpline was up, so I phoned and that actually then led to them contacting and coming and doing their interviews here. Which was long. I think it was about an eight-hour interview with the police. We can't be the only people who saw them, surely? My theory, then it fits for me, that they must have been there for one reason, which was to take Madeleine because of the timing. 
[2013 Andy Redwood: Our appeal that we've brought to the public today has got a number of really interesting dynamics in terms of the blonde, fair-haired males apparently lurking around the apartments. So we really need the public to stop and pause, look at the information and see if they can help us]
6 years missing
[2013 UK news anchor John Snow: A dramatic new line of enquiry for police investigating the disappearance of Madeleine McCann. They're now looking for a man suspected of sexually assaulting 5 young girls in Portuguese holiday resorts. The man, described as a lone intruder, attacked the girls in their beds, two of them in Praia da Luz, the very resort...]
[2013 Male UK reporter: Three families coming forward with stories of the lone intruder, incidents that had been reported to Portuguese police, but had not been passed on to the yard]
Anthony Summers present day: One startling element is the sheer number of cases in which there was evidence that a sexual predator had been active in the area of Praia da Luz, within 40 miles of where Madeleine McCann. British police investigating, they found that there had been no less than 28 cases, and typically the sexual predator had been making his way into houses that were owned by or rented by British tourists. One case that we came across, the parents of the children had been asleep in their bedroom with the door closed, and their two daughters, an 11 year-old and a 7 year-old had been asleep in the next door room. He'd come in and had laid down on the bed of the younger child. From what the little girls told their parents afterwards, the man had come into the room wearing a sort of medical mask. The child had said, ''Is that you, daddy?'' He was speaking English, saying, ''Yes.'' But sounding like a foreigner. 
[2013 Andy Redwood: The offender himself is described as having dark...Um, dark skin, dark as in tanned skin, short, black unkempt hair. We know that he spoke to the children largely, when he did speak, in English]
Anthony Summers present day: And he had a funny smell about him, that just said it wasn't daddy. 
[2013 Andy Redwood: In four of the most serious cases, he has sexually assaulted young white female children whilst they're in their bedrooms. These children are between the ages of seven to ten years of age and obviously this is a serious matter that we need to understand more about. Once we've identified this offender, we need to be able to prove or disprove whether these offences and that offender is connected to the disappearance of Madeleine McCann]
[2013 UK male reporter: She's been missing now for nearly seven years but detectives are working on yet another possible lead]
Robbyn Swan present day: When we made inquiries about the sexual assaults to the Mark Warner company who ran the Ocean Club at that time, uh, we were told that they didn't comment on whether or not they had been aware or knew of these sexual assaults at that time. Likewise, when we've sent a letter to the Foreign and Commonwealth office, they declined to comment, saying that they were not then commenting on any such cases. In 2007 in the Algarve, the Consul, when asked about the matter, said it had not been their job to give any such warnings. And I think we asked the question, ''If we have consular alerts at all, then why wasn't something as serious as the possibility of a child sexual predator being around, uh, why wasn't that posted in any kind of a warning by the British Foreign office?''  Would they have left their children alone had they known there was a sexual predator about? It seems highly unlikely that they, or any other parent would. 
Anthony Summers: There were two sightings that it seems to me haven't had sufficient attention, perhaps. At 10:45 pm on the night that Madeleine disappeared, a car was seen by a British witness with a woman in the front, looking into the back of the car, and he recognised her, knew the couple, and he knew that the woman very much wanted a child and apparently had been unable to have a child, and that they were going in the rough direction of the nearby marina. And at 6:00 am, a man called George Brooks who ran a little pizza business, was on his way to work in his car, and it was still dark, and down by the marina in lagos, his lights suddenly picked up a couple, one of whom were carrying a baby, and they seemed to be very disturbed by the fact that he'd picked them up in his lights. He says, ''You could tell from their posture that they were trying to carry the child without anyone seeing it and they were extremely disturbed when I caught them in my headlights.'' He reported that very early on to the local police, but it wasn't followed up until the next year. Possibly that was a real chance that was missed. These are all possible lines of investigation for the detectives of Operation Grange. 
Robbyn Swan: Also, Kate McCann later revealed she learned something that literally became the stuff of her nightmares. The McCann party felt very lucky because the morning after their arrival in Praia da Luz, one of the group, Rachael Oldfield, had managed to go down to the tapas restaurant and organise a block booking for the week at 8:30 pm every night. They felt it was the easiest place to have dinner while leaving the children sleeping in their own apartments 
Neil Berry: The rule was that in order to book a table at the tapas restaurant, you need to book in the morning. Um, but we could never get on there's only a small amount of covers. I remember thinking, ''Hang on, how's this fair that these people are pre-booked?'' But, I think due to the size of the McCann party, they allowed them to pre-book and the week. 
Robbyn Swan: A year later, while going through the newly-released Portuguese police files, Kate McCann came across a copy of the reservation book for the restaurant, and the note next to the booking indicated that the reason the parents wanted to dine at that time every night was that they would be leaving their children alone in the aparments. And the book where the entry had been made was visable in plain sight in the restaurant. Kate McCann wrote that she was hugely dismayed by this fact. She felt that would have served as a green light to a potential abductor.
[On the screen it says - The Metropolitan police and the policia judiciaria investigation into the disappearance of Madeleine McCann remains ongoing]
Ernie Allen: I have always argued to law enforcement, you don't close any file on a missing child case until the child is either found or until we know with certainty what happened to them. 
[2002 U.S female reporter: At 2:30 am, police say a man slipped into a window at this Federal Heights home and kidnapped 14-year-old Elizabeth Smart at gunpoint. Her nine-year-old sister was the only witness. Male U.S police officer: Any time we're not right on scene immediately, uh, a two-hour window gives the opportunity for anyone to--to be away from this area]
[2003 Male U.S reporter: As search teams comb the woods, roads, and creeks of Washington county, this mother waits for word of a clue about what happened to her little boy. Shawn Hornbeck vanished...  Pamela Hornback: I know kids don't vanish without a trace. There's something out there, there's somebody out there that knows something, or has something and all they need to do is come forward...]
Ernie Allen present day: 'Cause in most of these cases, the abductor is not taking the child to kill. He's taking the child for another purpose. 
[1981 U.K Male reporter: Jaycee Lee Dugard, here seen enjoying a fishing trip near her home in eastern California, was just 11 when she was forced into a strangers car. Neighbours helped keep media attention focused on the case. There was a high-profile investigation, there was a high-profile police investigation, but despite a few false sightings, the trail went cold...]
[2009 Ernie Allen to Kate and Gerry McCann: The goal was to use technology to keep these cases alive, to provide new hope for parents and new leads for law enforcements and we said at the time, ''Wouldn't it be great if we could actually find one of these kids?'' And we found 900 of them]
Ernie Allen present day: The rationale for ageing the photographs of long-term missing children is it doesn't do much good to circulate the photograph of a three-year-old if she'd now be 13 or 14 years-old.
[2009 Ernie Allen to Kate and Gerry McCann again: Young children's faces change very quickly. Kate McCann: Yeah. Ernie Allen points between two pictures, one of Kate at six and one of Madeleine at three: As you can see, she has her mothers jawline. She has her mothers mouth. It's striking. She has her mothers dimples. Kate McCann pointing to a picture on a computer screen, Madeleine's picture is to the right Kate points to the left a different picture of her as a child next to Madeleine's photo: That's me as well isn't it? Ernie Allen: This is you as well. Kate McCann laughing: Six! Ernie Allen: Exactly. Shows a computer generated age progression picture of Madeleine]
Ernie Allen present day: For a lot of searching parents, it's their child. So they get their child back after two years, five years, ten years, twenty years if only in an image. 
[2009 Kate McCann: It's a very emotional thing, really, to see my daughter in a different way to how I remember her. Um...So if I'm honest, initially it was quite upsetting. And then I started to look at the features and I thought, ''Well, that's definitely Madeleine and that bits Madeleine,'' And, you know...]
Ernie Allen present day: We want the public to adjust their thinking so they're not looking for a literal three-year-old.
Jim Gamble: Every day, Kate and Gerry McCann get out of bed and they look after their two children Sean and Amelie. And they're fueled, I believe, by hope. There's huge hope to be had with the advances in technology. Year on year, DNA is getting better. Year on year other technologies, including facial recognition, are getting better. And as we use that technology to revisit and review that which we captured in the past, there's every likelihood that something we already know will slip into position. 
[2003 U.S Anchor man: Good afternoon. I'm Charles Gibson, ABC news. There is a story that has broken this afternoon that I suspect comes under the heading of a miracle. 14-year-old Elizabeth Smart was abducted from her home and everyone had pretty much given up hope that she would ever be found alive. Witnesses apparently spotted her in the car of a man who has been the subject of a police search for some time, saying they thought they had seen Elizabeth Smart in his car. Police descended on the scene, stopped the car...]
Ernie Allen present day: There are many, many cases we can point to in which children have been found, have come home alive after months, after years. Jaycee Dugard in California abducted waiting for a school bus, recovered 18 years later, alive. 
[2009 Reporter 1: Jaycee Dugard, who was kidnapped at aged 11 and held for 18 years...]
[2009 Reporter 2: Police are searching a house near San Fransico. The man is a registered sex offender. He and his wife were detained after walking into a police station with a younger woman, who later told officers...]
[2009 police detective to a reporter: My hope was at that point, after all these years is to recover her and prosecute these people, and now to get her back alive, it's like winning the lottery, you know? You know, so we get her back alive and she sounds like she's okay...]
[2007 Reporter 3: Shawn Hornbeck hadn't seen his family since he vanished more than four years ago when he was an 11-year-old boy outside riding his bike. Pamela Hornbeck: I still feel like I'm in a dream, only this time, it's a good dream. It's not my nightmare that I've lived for four and a half years... Reporter: After Shawn vanished, his family created a foundation to help find missing children. They never stopped searching until police called them with the news they'd been waiting for. Craig Akers Shawn's step-father:...That he's alive. And those were the sweetest words. Reporter: The key to finding Shawn was a white truck. On Thursday, a resident of this apartment complex spotted a white truck there and alerted the police...]
Ernie Allen present day: The three Cleveland girls, missing ten years. Baby abducted from the hospital in New York, who identified herself 23 years later after having been raised by the abductor. The mother of that child never gave up hope. There have been cases in the United States in which witnesses, people who have information, haven't come forward for decades. And then one day provide information that helps lead to the resolution of a case.
[2007 Male reporter: Elizabeth Smart is now an accomplished 20-year-old. She listened to as her father described how he hoped their story had comforted, even inspired, the McCann's. Ed Smart in an interview: As I spoke with Kate, you know, she--she said to me that, you know, she'd had some dreams recently and that, you know, she felt Madeleine was there and she was gonna come back and I told her that's what I felt about Elizabeth. Keep the faith. Keep hope alive]
Ernie Allen present day: Previously, the individual with sexual interest in a prepubescent child typically felt abhorrent, isolated, alone. Suddenly with the advent of the internet, he discovers he's part of the global community. 
Jim Gamble: You couldn't walk into your local bar or restaurant or club and say, ''Look, you know, I'm a paedophile and I'm going out tonight to kind of, you know, meet up with a few kids. Anyone wanna come with me?'' You'd end up, you know, in your local accident and emergency for a long weekend if you were lucky. However, on the internet, you can do that. You can go into those dark places and say, ''This is who I am and this is what I do,'' And you're made to feel beter about who you are because there's so many others. Indecent images online, they are symptoms of a problem, not about technology, but about people who will exploit and abuse children. There is not doubt that human trafficking is a massive, massive problem.
Patricia De Sousa Cipriano: They are a commodity. In 2016, you have, between zero and aged 12 years old, you have 124 cases, and between 13 and 17 years old, 1,543 missing children cases. Compared with the rest of Europe, I think we are very, very good. However, these cases, uh, are worrying. They are few, it's a fact, but they were not solved, and that is also a fact. 
Jim Gamble: So when you tuck your own child into bed at night, you know, reflect on the fact how lucky they are to have a parent who loves and cares for them, and as you step out of the bedroom, think about the children who don't have that. Think about those children who would love to have a parent who cared for them, a carer who loved and looked after them. Think about those children trapped in these images and do what you can to lobby and press to make sure that more money is invested in making sure we can protect the most vulnerable in our society. 
Julian Peribanez: It's something that our society hides. It's shown me a part of the human being that, uh, I didn't--I didn't know. It's shown me the monster. 
Jim Gamble: Nobody wants to look into those dark spaces and places where this type of abuse takes place. God knows those people that work in this environment don't want to do that. And once you have, you realise that no ordinary person who hasn't had to have seen it will ever want to go there. 
Julian Peribanez: I've done thousands of cases. With the Madeleine case, I've seen the worst things a human being can see. Um, the worst. I was hoping to find out some clue, some--Something about Madeleine. But, Um, also it was a dead end. Nobody knew anything about the girl. Nobody. Yeah, at that point, you lose humanity and you lose the...You lose everything at that point. So, finally at the end, I got all the emails, all the files, put a report and took it to the National Police. 
Juan Carlos Ruiloba Former head of cybercrime unit, Policia Nacional - Barcelona, Spain. In Spanish: Metodo 3 is a private detective agency. They found paedophilic material. We started to investigate which people were distributing this video with paedophilic content on that network. The first operation was called Lolita P-Mix. We investigated the facts. 
Julian Peribanez: I gave him the evidence and the line of investigation and they only had to pull the strong. 
Juan Carlos Ruiloba: In the end, 23 people were questioned and 13 arrested.
Julian Peribanez: That's the best thing that came from this case, the thing that I'm most proud of.
Juan Carlos Ruiloba: Some of these investigations may lead to these minors being found and rescued from their captors. 
Julian Peribanez: In two days, my daughter is going to be four years old, which is the age that Madeleine McCann disappeared. The need to know the truth keeps me going forward. There's always, always, something left to do...Till you find her.
Patricia De Sousa Cipriano: I've always wanted to be a human rights lawyer. The vanishing of Madeleine McCann woke me up to other cases, and I started to--to look for them and I found them. In Portugal, we have, in 2016, more than 1,000 cases of sexual abuse, more than 500, Uh, in child pornography. Uh, so every day, the Judiciary police is fighting against this new, uh, wave of criminality. 
Belfast - Northern Ireland
Jim Gamble: When you say ''Child pornography,'' The general public will think of the Lolita, the ''barely legal'' site. It's where their brain allows them to go because their brain doesn't want to take them to the two, three, and four-year-old being brutally abused, being violated. Nobody wants to go there because once you do, you cannot come back. And I remember on occasions when we had stories that we really wanted to get out to the media, some papers were coming back and saying, ''We've already done our paedophile story this month. There's only so much our readers can take.'' I remember doing, you know, interviews with radio programs that are really heavyweight and serious, but they didn't want you to mention particular things because we don't want people to go there. The problem is the children who are captured and trapped in these images are already there. I don't see where we're investing in things that make a difference. If this was counter-terrorism, we'd be declaring war on these people. We would be throwing billions of pounds, not millions of pounds at it. We'd be engaging from the classroom through to every business in the world and we'd be collaborating in ways that we only do arout CT, counter-terrorism. So there needs to be a wake up call. For me, the case that really brought this type of work into focus involved an international investigation. We had a colleague who had captured an image from a group that they had infiltrated and they got the image of this child, and sent it to us because they believed this child was in the UK. One of my own children was at that age at the time and so you are totally engaged with the search. You know, you're desperate for news. And as time went on, and more images were discovered, and you began to see the levels of brutality involved...And I was coming down the escalator, in Gatwick airport in London when I received the phone call...[Sighs, voice cracks] When I--When I received the phone call to say that that child had been found. And...Coming down the escalator, had you spoken to me, I couldn't have replied. I was literally so overcome with the emotion. After it, I probably became...more relentless and less compromising. I absolutely believe that in my lifetime, we will find out what happened to Madeleine McCann.
Ernie Allen: Somebody knows what's happened to Madeleine McCann.
[UK reporter 1: Detectives hunting for Madeleine McCann have been given more money to keep on searching...]
[UK reporter 2: 150,000 is going towards Operation grange...]
[UK reporter 1: Taking the total so far to more than £11 million]
[2017 Footage shows people in a church at night holding up lit candles. Haynes Hubbard: The lord be with you. The people in unison: And also with you. Then let us pray]
Susane Hubbard present day: Every year that we held a vigil in Praia da Luz, Kate would send a message to be read. This was ten years in this past May. We knew that we had to be there for the tenth anniversary. She sent a note to the community that was gathered, mostly to thank them for their presence and to thank them for continuing to hope. Susan begins to read out Kate's message: ''To our dear friends,ten years without Madeleine...'' [Sniffles] ''Ten years without Madeleine. If I had even let that thought enter my head back in May, 2007, I wouldn't have lasted another day. And now, a decade on, it is still inconseivable. How can it be? Our little girl who brought to us the gift of parenthood, ten years on. Despite the evil and the hurt that has come our way, we have been very fortunate, having witnessed and experienced goodness and kindness in great abdundance during this long and difficult period of stolen time.'' 
[Child sounds as videos of Madeleine are being shown]
Susan Hubbard continues: ''We are especially grateful to our friends and supporters in Luz for being strong enough and brave enough to keep Madeleine and our family in your prayers and in your hearts. Your love and compassion has given us fortitude over the years and sustained our hope in immeasurable amounts. And so, thank you for everything.''
[Video of Madeleine and The twins singing ''If you're happy and you know it clap your hands.''] 
Susan Hubbard continues: ''But above all, for not giving up on Madeleine. With our love and our very best wishes, Kate, Gerry, Madeleine, Sean and Amelie, and all of our family.''
11 years missing...
[Theme music plays...]

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