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Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

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Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by jeanmonroe on 03.03.14 13:53

http://www.itv.com/news/update/2014-03-03/police-search-coventry-woodland-for-missing-mother/

Police officers and search dogs are currently scouring an area at Coombe Abbey Country Park. Credit: ITV News

West Midlands Police, who started searching the area this morning, said the searches were prompted by "new information".

Police probing disappearance of mother search woodland

Police investigating the disappearance of Coventry mother Nicola Payne, 22 years ago, have begun searching woodland in the city after receiving "new information".

23 minutes ago
Police search woodland in hunt for missing mother

Police officers are searching woodland at Coombe Abbey Country Park in Coventry, as part of the inquiry into the disappearance of Nicola Payne.

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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by worriedmum on 03.03.14 18:48

Shouldn't somebody ask Sandra ?  lol4
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And drugs and Money dogs

Post by PeterMac on 13.03.14 15:11

Notoriously unreliable, obviously.

http://www.romfordrecorder.co.uk/news/crime-court/six_arrested_as_police_seize_80k_cash_and_gold_ingot_worth_40k_in_collier_row_raid_1_3401108
Police seized £80,000 in cash and a 1.5kg gold bar worth £40,000 this morning during a dawn raid.
Eight officers from Havering’s North Cluster Neighbourhood Policing Team (NPT), assisted by a specially trained drug and cash dog, discovered £50,000 hidden in a safe hidden beneath floorboards at an address in Highfield Road, Collier Row - and a further £30,000 in other areas of the premises.
The gold ingot and a small quantity of cannabis were also discovered during the search, which was led by Sergeant Chris Toms on the back of community intelligence.
Six people, three men and three women, aged 24-53 were arrested at the scene on suspicion of money laundering offences and taken to an east London police station.
Police Constable Jordan Pascel, said: “We have made a very significant discovery today. The amount of cash and other items seized were significant and I am confident that we have reduced crime in our neighbourhood as a result of our actions.”
The NPT were assisted by Territorial Support Group officers during the 5.30am raid, and a number of computers were also seized.
Officers had applied for and were granted the warrant under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. NPT teams across the borough execute raids on a weekly basis.

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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by jeanmonroe on 13.03.14 15:18

[/quote]

"i've found the money, boss'

"Gooood dog! Let's play 'fetch the tennis ball'

"Yes please, Woof, Woof"

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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by tiny on 13.03.14 15:23

worriedmum wrote:Shouldn't somebody ask Sandra ?  lol4

shouldn't someone ask Gerry, as he seems to know how unreliable they are.perhaps he would like to show us where and when these dogs were so wrong,
what a muppet
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SEA BASS and Cadaverine - The facts !

Post by PeterMac on 13.03.14 15:37


http://openagricola.nal.usda.gov/Record/IND43628664
Biogenic amines formation and its relation to microbiological and sensory attributes in ice-stored whole, gutted and filleted Mediterranean Sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

The effect of gutting and filleting on the formation of biogenic amines and its relation to microbiological and sensory attributes in ice-stored sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) was studied.
Pseudomonads, H2S-producing bacteria, Brochothrix thermosphacta and to a lesser extent Enterobacteriaceae were the dominant micro-organisms in whole, gutted and filleted sea bass.
Higher populations (P<0.05) of these micro-organisms were present in filleted sea bass as compared to gutted and whole fish samples.
Seven biogenic amines namely: putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, tyramine, tryptamine, spermine and histamine were determined in fish samples.
Putrescine was the main biogenic amine formed. Its highest value (23.86 mg/kg) was recorded in filleted sea bass on day 16 of storage.
Respective putrescine values for gutted and whole sea bass were 12.64 and 3.12 mg/kg (day 16).
Putrescine levels of whole, gutted and filleted sea bass showed a steep increase between days 11 and 16 of storage when respective population of Pseudomonads reached approximately 10⁶-10⁷ (whole), 10⁷-10⁸ (gutted) and 10⁸-10⁹ (filleted) cfu/g.

Cadaverine was not detected before day 9 in whole and gutted sea bass samples and before day 11 in filleted samples.
Surprisingly, for whole sea bass a maximum value of cadaverine (6.47 mg/kg) was recorded on the final day of storage (day 16), whereas respective levels for gutted and filleted samples levels were lower (1.19 and 0.58 mg/kg).

Almost simultaneous production of tryptamine and tyramine was observed in whole, gutted and filleted sea bass samples throughout the entire storage period in ice.
Spermine and spermidine showed a decreasing pattern with increasing storage and were undetectable in whole and gutted sea bass samples between day 13 and 16 of storage.
Finally, no histamine was present in both whole and gutted sea bass, whereas interestingly, for filleted sea bass samples, levels of histamine increased after day 9 of storage but remained...

What a wonderful 'Hausfrau" is Kate, keeping whole fish for 9 days, before throwing it away.

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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by Guest on 13.03.14 17:59

spit coffee

BTW I adore see bass - in France Daurade  smilie
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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by Guest on 13.03.14 18:43

PeterMac wrote:
http://openagricola.nal.usda.gov/Record/IND43628664
Biogenic amines formation and its relation to microbiological and sensory attributes in ice-stored whole, gutted and filleted Mediterranean Sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

The effect of gutting and filleting on the formation of biogenic amines and its relation to microbiological and sensory attributes in ice-stored sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) was studied.
Pseudomonads, H2S-producing bacteria, Brochothrix thermosphacta and to a lesser extent Enterobacteriaceae were the dominant micro-organisms in whole, gutted and filleted sea bass.
Higher populations (P<0.05) of these micro-organisms were present in filleted sea bass as compared to gutted and whole fish samples.
Seven biogenic amines namely: putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, tyramine, tryptamine, spermine and histamine were determined in fish samples.
Putrescine was the main biogenic amine formed. Its highest value (23.86 mg/kg) was recorded in filleted sea bass on day 16 of storage.
Respective putrescine values for gutted and whole sea bass were 12.64 and 3.12 mg/kg (day 16).
Putrescine levels of whole, gutted and filleted sea bass showed a steep increase between days 11 and 16 of storage when respective population of Pseudomonads reached approximately 10⁶-10⁷ (whole), 10⁷-10⁸ (gutted) and 10⁸-10⁹ (filleted) cfu/g.

Cadaverine was not detected before day 9 in whole and gutted sea bass samples and before day 11 in filleted samples.
Surprisingly, for whole sea bass a maximum value of cadaverine (6.47 mg/kg) was recorded on the final day of storage (day 16), whereas respective levels for gutted and filleted samples levels were lower (1.19 and 0.58 mg/kg).

Almost simultaneous production of tryptamine and tyramine was observed in whole, gutted and filleted sea bass samples throughout the entire storage period in ice.
Spermine and spermidine showed a decreasing pattern with increasing storage and were undetectable in whole and gutted sea bass samples between day 13 and 16 of storage.
Finally, no histamine was present in both whole and gutted sea bass, whereas interestingly, for filleted sea bass samples, levels of histamine increased after day 9 of storage but remained...

What a wonderful 'Hausfrau" is Kate, keeping whole fish for 9 days, before throwing it away.

Note this study was done on ice stored fish.
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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by Guest on 13.03.14 20:20

dantezebu wrote: [...]

Note this study was done on ice stored fish.
***
Isn't that, what one does with fresh fish? Put them in the fridge or in the freezer?
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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by Guest on 13.03.14 21:29

Châtelaine wrote:
dantezebu wrote: [...]

Note this study was done on ice stored fish.
***
Isn't that, what one does with fresh fish? Put them in the fridge or in the freezer?

Usually yes, a fridge or freezer. But it was a study done to see if sea bass had a longer storage life on ice if it was kept whole or gutted or filleted.
So the fridge doesn't work here, only if the fish was kept on ice. The implication of the study is that by gutting or filleting the fish you release bacteria from the gastrointestinal tract therefore increasing the production of the biogenic amines. Cadaverine is measured in this test as a indication of spoilage, however the toxicity arises from the histamine also produced.
Cooking does not appear to have any affect on the levels of histamine, cadaverine and putricine. So a bad fish is not made safe by cooking. But I cannot find any studies that show the rate of increase in these amines after cooking.
Unless it was known how the fish was stored after being caught prior to being sold, if it was bought filleted, and then how stored afterwards, cooked whole or head removed and discarded etc etc the 9 day cadaverine detection is meaningless.
Is does seem however, although sea bass does produce cadaverine, it is not the fish that produces it in the greatest amount. Fresh mackerel and tuna have much higher levels as do raw molluscs/shellfish and canned or dried fish.

For me the Sean and the sea bass in GMs blog is a red herring (don't know about cadaverine in herring)
Eddie is a cadaver dog, that detects the scent of human decompositon. Not specifically or only cadaverine. I don't think the little mastermind was pre-empting anything here. They tried to explain it away with the leaking meat, blood, nappies etc, but it's absolute nonsense.
A bit like the DNA explaination he gave, discussed here the other day. Trying to treat everyone like idiots.
It will be his downfall.



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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by stumo on 13.03.14 22:33

Châtelaine wrote:
dantezebu wrote: [...]

Note this study was done on ice stored fish.
***
Isn't that, what one does with fresh fish? Put them in the fridge or in the freezer?

I thought you were supposed to leave them in your car. Damn, got that one wrong...
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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by kimHager on 14.03.14 15:16

No no I think TM thought so also.. When you take fish and possibly (IF u have a fridge in your car. Although the fridge may be leaking from that sea bass that you left in a fridge in hot temps as to get all that cadeverine flowing )then you add some crappy nappy, dirty laundry, ( that you must have overlooked as your meticulous about washing it all right down to the dirty curtains )and of course some bloody meat that was forgotten to be put in that hot leaky fridge.... Then you have the brains to say your two yr old loves that sea bass... That would make you invincible if you ate the fish and lived to tell about it... ROFL all hypothetical mind you. I don't think that story would fly at all

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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by Rasputin on 14.03.14 15:39

This kind of hygiene from health professionals...it's little wonder MRSA was rampant in our hospitals at one point.

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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by Guest on 14.03.14 15:52

Rasputin wrote:
This kind of hygiene from health professionals...it's little wonder MRSA was rampant in our hospitals at one point.

We have a new one now:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-26466674
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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by kimHager on 14.03.14 16:06

On the serious side a family toothbrush and wearing clothes that have and giving your child a toy that has touched 6dead bodies.... Yes for health care "professionals " this is shocking

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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by PeterMac on 14.03.14 17:47

Châtelaine wrote:spit coffee

BTW I adore see bass - in France Daurade  smilie
Daurade is Gilt Head Bream ! The one with the gold stripe across its nose.

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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by Guest on 14.03.14 21:12

PeterMac wrote:
Châtelaine wrote:spit coffee

BTW I adore see bass - in France Daurade  smilie
Daurade is Gilt Head Bream  !  The one with the gold stripe across its nose.
***
Thank you very much, Peter. I've meanwhile fired my Irish assistant for different reasons, but knowing now that she translated a menu [for a diner with 100+] with Daurade Royale as sea bass, would have been just another reason to do that again  big grin 
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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by PeterMac on 14.03.14 22:34

Châtelaine wrote:
PeterMac wrote:
Daurade is Gilt Head Bream  !  The one with the gold stripe across its nose.
Thank you very much, Peter.  I've meanwhile fired my Irish assistant for different reasons, but knowing now that she translated a menu [for a diner with 100+] with Daurade Royale as sea bass, would have been just another reason to do that again  
I had actually DID have Sea Bass (lubina) for my dinner this evening, with a fine julienne of ginger, garlic and spring onion tops, on a bed of puree de pommes, with pickled cucumber and a red peppers,

I now expect dogs to be homing in from miles around ! ! !

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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by ultimaThule on 14.03.14 22:43

As tempting as your repast sounds, PeterMac, I am now resolved never to eat sea bass for fear of popping my clogs unexpectedly and finding myself raised from the grave dug up by a pack of enthusiastic canines before the day of judgement.   big grin
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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by tigger on 15.03.14 7:07

ultimaThule wrote:As tempting as your repast sounds, PeterMac, I am now resolved never to eat sea bass for fear of popping my clogs unexpectedly and finding myself raised from the grave dug up by a pack of enthusiastic canines before the day of judgement.   big grin

As it happens I spent last evening in conversation with Eefy, a Springer Spaniel who's the spitting image of Keela.
She was very interested in JH and the esteem in which we hold her race.

Sea Bass, she told me, well, she can take it or leave it, but that steak tartare I had a week ago and which she could smell on my (work) jumper - I'd touched the jumper before washing my hands -  smilie now that was interesting.

She was gorgeous and her owners were fascinated by my Eddie and Keela story and now by the truth of the lie as well.
An evening well spent!  smilie 

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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by frost on 15.03.14 7:56

well if the mccanns were so slack at removing rotting rubbish including pooey nappies and festering meat etc ugh the smell must have been pungent and there I was thinking hygiene would be a doctors to priority in every aspect of their lives infact I have always thought doctors would be a little OCD if anything regarding cleanliness I very much doubt that the mccanns would be preparing seabass for a 2 year old child . 

If they haven't the time to remove festering rubbish which how they travelled in a car with such a vile smell is beyond me (believe me dirty nappies get rather ripe even in a nappy sack ) , also wouldn't the car have been crawling with maggots and flies by this point ?  rotting meat and we all know the phrase flies round sh** . seriously your telling me they drove round with all this in the car for how long ? hmm well  I certainly don't think they would have time to debone  seabass for a 2 year old child do you ? . 

Personally I cannot think of one 2 year old child out of the hundreds I have come across in my life that had a penchant for sea bass , fish fingers maybe but not seabass.

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LEICESTER salutes dogs.

Post by PeterMac on 15.03.14 9:26

I wonder if GM is going to be the on=duty medic for this event.

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/British-Army-sniffer-dogs-honoured-Melton-Mowbray/story-20770216-detail/story.html#ixzz2vqAgZDID
British Army sniffer dogs to be honoured in Melton parade
By Leicester Mercury | Posted: March 06, 2014

By Alan Thompson

They say every dog has his day, and next month military working dogs which served on the front-line in Afghanistan will have theirs.
The Royal Army Veterinary Corps, based at the defence Animal Centre in Melton, will parade thorough the town with the four-legged heroes to exercise its "right of passage".
Around a dozen of the military working horses from the base, which are used on ceremonial duties in the capital, will also take part in the parade through the town on April 10.
They will be followed by two dozen of the weapons and explosives search dogs and guard dogs used for security to such great effect in Afghanistan.

Every dog and horse which sees UK operational service anywhere in the world is trained at the centre.
This year will have a special poignancy because of the part the base played in the First World War, when it served as a remount depot, providing horses for the front.
The Band of the Parachute Regiment – which was stationed at the base prior to the Arnhem operation in 1944 – will lead the parade through the town.
About 170 personnel from the DAC and 1 Military Working Dog Unit – where the dogs go prior to front-line service – will be taking part.

A bronze statue of a German shepherd, one of the breeds trained at the centre, was recently unveiled at Melton Borough Council's Parkside offices, reinforcing the town's strong links with the base.
Major Steve Leavis, RAVC, second-in-command at the DAC, said: "It will be quite a spectacle. It is a tremendous opportunity for the RAVC to reinforce the bond it has with the people of the town.
"It also kick-starts the commemoration of the Great War and should bring everybody together."
Retired commandant Lt Col Peter Roffey, who will be taking part in the parade, said: "It is a privilege that the council recognise the service that the corps has given to the town, having been at the base since 1946.
"It is a great honour for any unit or corps to be given the freedom of the borough.
"It is the people of the borough saying they appreciate the service you have given.

"It will have a special significance given the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War."
It will be the fifth time the corps has exercised its right to parade through Melton "with bayonets fixed, drums beating, and colours flying" since being awarded the Freedom of the Borough in May, 1977.
Subsequent parades took place in 1987, 1997 and 2007.
The 30-minute parade will leave the cattle market car park at 2pm, head down Scalford Road into Nottingham Street and the Market Place, where the salute will be taken.
It will go along Leicester Street, Wilton Road and Nottingham Road, re-entering the cattle market car park after the fire station. Rolling road closures will be in effect.
With lunch in Rothley afterwards ?

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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by Woofer on 15.03.14 9:41

I reckon one can come to the conclusion that the Mcs just ain`t animal lovers.  Wonder if the twins have pets?
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Re: Why are the police using those 'notoriously unreliable' cadavar dogs?

Post by jeanmonroe on 15.03.14 9:54

Woofer wrote:  Wonder if the twins have pets?

Wonder if the twins have been told a 'pet theory'?

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Close to the bone

Post by PeterMac on 15.03.14 16:35

Picked this up from somewhere else.
It seems to hit home, especially when we recall Aunty Philomena, or some other idiot talking about PLANTING the scent of cadverine in all those places, and visiting 6 bodies in the week before, and not changing clothes, and taking Cuddle cat to work to wipe up the drips . . . .

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