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COLD CASE TEAM IN MADELEINE MCCANN HUNT

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COLD CASE TEAM IN MADELEINE MCCANN HUNT

Post by Guest on 29.01.12 10:41

COLD CASE TEAM IN MADELEINE MCCANN HUNT


A Major ­Investigation Team is assigned to Operation Grange. Staff ­numbers are open to change ­depending on the needs of the ­review

29th January 2012


By Jonathan Corke

THE British police hunt for Madeleine McCann will cost more than £1.3million in its first year.


Scotland Yard’s 37-strong team includes three detective inspectors and five detective sergeants.

There are also 19 detective ­constables on the case under the lead of Detective Chief Inspector Andy Redwood.

And three of the country’s top cold case officers have been brought in.


The three, from the ­Metropolitan Police’s Murder Review Group, are assisting the main Operation Grange team ­reviewing the Madeleine case files.


The combined salaries of the team total more than £1.3million with thousands also being spent ­following up leads, including at least four trips abroad.

The Met has vowed there will be no limits to the probe, which is being funded through a grant from the Home Office.

Already this year the cold case squad has seen Gary Dobson, 36, and David Norris, 35, brought to justice over the 1993 murder of black teenager Stephen ­Lawrence.

Detective Chief ­Superintendent Hamish Campbell, who led the Jill Dando ­murder inquiry, is also involved.

The Met refused to say if he was one of the three taking part in the Madeleine case but, we can reveal, he is helping oversee the probe.

Along with Commander Simon Foy, Mr Redwood and Detective Inspector Tim Dobson, Mr ­Campbell is part of a “Gold Group” monitoring the review.The group has met eight times since it began last May to discuss progress.

A spokesman for the Met said: “A Major ­Investigation Team is assigned to Operation Grange. Staff ­numbers are open to change ­depending on the needs of the ­review.”

Three-year-old Madeleine was on holiday with her parents Kate and Gerry, both 43, when she was snatched from their holiday apartment in Praia da Luz, ­Portugal, in May 2007.

At Christmas the McCanns said they remain hopeful of a breakthrough, adding: “Our search for Madeleine and the Metropolitan Police review of the case are ­progressing well.”

Around £2.5million raised through a fund set up by the ­McCanns, from Rothley, Leics, has been spent on the hunt for the youngster.

http://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/view/232610/Cold-case-team-in-Madeleine-McCann-hunt/

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Re: COLD CASE TEAM IN MADELEINE MCCANN HUNT

Post by Vera on 29.01.12 11:07

So...

Things is finally warming up!

thinking

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All I want is the truth...and when it comes out, one way or another, there'll be some people with big apologies to make...

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Re: COLD CASE TEAM IN MADELEINE MCCANN HUNT

Post by pennylane on 29.01.12 12:44

Three-year-old Madeleine was on holiday with her parents Kate and Gerry, both 43, when she was snatched from their holiday apartment in Praia da Luz, Portugal, in May 2007.


There they go with that crappy one-sided, biased reporting again! What rubbish our journalists spout.

Question is.... was Maddie already dead, as indicated by the blood and cadaver dog alerts, and was the person who "snatched" her related to her??

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missing persons procedures

Post by russiandoll on 31.01.12 18:18

this from Cheshire police force website, would assume same applies UK-wide, to be followed when a person is reported missing.

Missing Person Definition
2.2.1 The ACPO definition of a missing person is:
“Anyone whose whereabouts is unknown whatever the circumstances of
disappearance. They will be considered missing until located and their well-being
or otherwise established.”

Potential Links to Serious Offences
2.2.13 The majority of missing persons inquiries are quickly resolved. In a few cases,
however, the report of a missing person is the first step in a major crime case.
Therefore the initial stages of any missing person inquiry should commence on the
basis that the case may escalate into a serious crime inquiry.
It is always easier to
rein back from the early stages of a major inquiry than it is to recover missed
opportunities resulting from miscalculating in the early stages.Homicide
2.2.15 One of the fundamental facts to be determined in a missing person investigation is
the reason why the subject has disappeared. In cases where the circumstances
are suspicious or unexplained, use the maxim:
‘IF IN DOUBT, THINK MURDER’
2.2.16 Failure to apply such thinking in past cases has led to the loss of valuable
investigative opportunities and could ultimately result in failure to trace the missing
person or to gather sufficient evidence to convict a perpetrator.

2.2.17 The status of the relationship between the missing person and the person making
the initial report can also be important. Experience suggests that it would be wrong
for investigators to always assume such relationships are stable. There have been
numerous cases where the person reporting the crime and/or the missing person
has been found to be the perpetrator of the crime.
2.2.18 For further information see the ‘ACPO Murder Investigation Manual’.


Abduction
2.2.19 Police officers conducting investigations into missing persons should always
consider the possibility of abduction. In cases where there appears to be an
immediate threat of harm to a young person, consideration should be given to
implementing Child Rescue Alert see Section 2.7 - Child Rescue Alert. The
offence of abduction is usually a serious one and will manifest itself in one of three
contexts. These are:
• A sexual predator – this is the most difficult to recognise and becomes more
likely an option as others diminish;
• As retribution – to silence witnesses (or otherwise) connected to criminal
enterprise;
• As a result of custody or access disputes – these cases typically involve the
wrongful removal or retention of a child by a parent in derogation of the other
parent’s rights. They may also involve removals or retentions by parents or
other family members in violation of custody rights exercised by a custodial
parent or an institution. In these cases, the Police should investigate the
circumstances and consider using relevant powers.

Child Abuse

2.2.23 Young persons reported missing may have been exposed to physical or moral
danger and may have run away to avoid abuse. Enquiries should be made to
discover the reasons for the young person going missing and by speaking to them
on their return. Background enquiries, particularly with caring agencies and checks
against Police records, may assist in confirming or reducing suspicions. Where
there is any suspicion of abuse the case should be referred to the Public
Protection Referral Unit in the relevant Area. For further information, see the force
procedure covering Child Abuse

Police officers and police staff should, therefore, be alert to the possibility that the
missing person is either a victim of domestic abuse or an abuser.
The specialist
domestic abuse officers, within the Public Protection Unit, should be informed
when a domestic abuse victim or suspect/offender is missing. Previous domestic
abuse records and intelligence should be used to assist in the investigation.
Established links with domestic abuse service providers such as local refuges


Major Crime Links to Missing Persons
2.2.38 When a serious crime has been committed, the manner in which it is reported to
the Police will depend on the prevailing circumstances as known to that person at
the time. This means that some offences, e.g., abduction or murder, will initially be
reported as missing persons and appropriate escalation is important. Similarly,
some cases which may have been reported as missing persons, in other
circumstances, skip that stage and are reported as a serious crime. In the latter
case, it should be an investigative consideration to open a missing person report
and follow the initial investigative and reporting procedures recommended in this
guidance.


Initial Reporting
2.3.1 Detailed and accurate information must be recorded about the circumstances of
the disappearance and the reasons for making the report. This information should
also include the status of the person making the report, e.g., boyfriend, parent,
friend, third party.
This is particularly relevant where allegations of a serious crime
follow, as the information given, and the circumstances of it being given and by
whom, may be important to that investigation. For example, there have been a
number of murders where the perpetrator has reported the victim to the police as a
missing person. In such cases it is possible that witness statements will be
required at a later stage.


2.3.7 The minimum information to be gathered when taking the initial report is:
• Name
• Age
• Ethnicity
• Description of person
• Description of clothing
• Home address
• Location missing from
• Circumstances of going missing
• Whether this behaviour out of character
• Details of any vehicle or other transport used
• Assessment of the person reporting
• Name, address and telephone number of person reporting

Duty of Positive Action
2.4.1 The Human Rights Act 1998 places a positive obligation on Police Officers to take
reasonable action within their powers, to safeguard the rights of individuals who
may be at risk. Those rights that may be relevant to missing persons are: the right
to life (Article 2 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR)): the right
not to be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment (Article 3
ECHR); the right to prohibition of slavery and forced labour (Article 4 ECHR); the
right to private and family life (Article 8 ECHR) and, the right to freedom of
expression, including freedom to receive information (Article 10 ECHR). Failure to
thoroughly investigate a report of a missing person may leave an individual at risk
and the police service vulnerable to a legal challenge under the Human Rights Act
or the law relating to negligence.
2.4.2 Where a missing person has been identified as being ‘High or Medium Risk’,
positive action becomes an obligation at every stage of a missing person
investigation.

Make an initial assessment of the circumstances of the disappearance in
order to make a judgement regarding the risks to which that person or the
community are likely to be exposed.
The decision, the evidence supporting it
and where the information came from should be recorded on the Form 36.
Gather sufficient information about the missing person to enable an effective
and thorough investigation to be conducted. The depth of that information will
vary according to the assessment of risk. Very detailed information and a
lifestyle profile will be needed in ‘High Risk’ cases.

Classification of Risk and Response
2.4.20 The table below sets out the definition of each category and what each category
means in terms of operational response:
‘HIGH RISK’
The risk posed is immediate and there
are substantial grounds for believing
that the subject is in danger through
their own vulnerability; or may have
been the victim of a serious crime; or
the risk posed is immediate and there
are substantial grounds for believing
that the public is in danger.
This category requires the immediate
deployment of police resources and a
member of the Area senior
management team or similar command
level must be involved in the
examination of initial lines of enquiry
and approval of appropriate staffing
levels. Such cases should lead to the
appointment of a Senior Investigating
Officer.
Investigative Issues to Consider
2.4.31 The following issues should be considered when taking the initial report and
throughout the life of the investigation. The conduct of the investigation and
determining the level of risk are bound together and should be developed as such.
Decisions should be recorded, if necessary in a policy log, showing what is being

2.4.32 Missing persons can be categorised within one of the following groups:
• Lost Person – this is a person who is temporarily disorientated and would
wish to be found, e.g., someone who has gone walking and does not know
where they are;
• Missing Person who has Voluntarily Gone Missing – this is someone who has
control over their actions and who has decided upon a course of action, e.g.,
wishes to leave home or commit suicide;
• Missing Person under the Influence of a Third Party – someone who has
gone missing against their will, e.g., abduction or murder victim, or where, for
example, a child has gone off with a parent or other carer.
2.4.33 Such factors will enable the investigating officer to establish the priority of lines of
enquiry and determine the appropriate resources required.
2.4.34 If the subject’s whereabouts is unknown, issues like opportunity, age, ethnicity,
ability, mental fitness, disability and previous conduct are highly relevant. Missing
young children are more likely to be lost than abducted but equally their distress is
likely to lead to early recovery. If they are not found quickly the odds change and
concerns that they have become imperilled, e.g., in water, trapped, or abducted
increase. Potential suicides can be assessed against family and medical advice,
previous missing behaviour, the presence or absence of medication, recent
evidence of state of mind and so forth.


REMEMBER, IF IN DOUBT, THINK THE WORST
UNTIL THE CONTRARY IS PROVED

2.4.38 The last sighting is always relevant. In the few cases that turn out to be homicides
the last sighting is often related to the crime and is often the best evidence of
demeanour, description and intention. Consider who made the sighting, when and
in what circumstances and establish whether it can be corroborated by other
means, e.g. by CCTV.


Closure of Incidents
2.4.77 NSPIS incidents will normally only be closed when the person is traced. All
outstanding missing persons incidents will remain open until closure is authorised
by the Targeted Patrol Team Inspector. The appropriate closing code must be
selected and the reasons for closing the incident must be endorsed on the incident
log.
2.4.78 Where a missing person remains outstanding and closure of the incident is duly
authorised as set out in above, the officer authorising closure must endorse the
Form 36 accordingly and ensure all documentation is forwarded to the Area
Missing Persons Co-ordinator (see section 2.5.52).

2.5.34 Where the missing person has not been found, the case must remain open and
the subject of review as deemed appropriate in line with the process outlined in
this section, see Long Term Case Management.
The Purpose of the Supervision and Review Process
2.5.35 This is as follows:
• Review the level of risk;
• Check for any outstanding and incomplete actions;
• Quality assure actions already taken;
• Set new actions and enquiries in order to bring the investigation to a
successful conclusion;
• Make recommendations about the management and ownership of the
investigation;
• Set future review date(s) as appropriate.

2.5.50 Intelligence is relevant in missing persons inquiries and databases can be
searched to provide information relevant to the background of any parties to the
inquiry. Intelligence records may prove valuable in establishing locations and
associates known to the missing person. Intelligence records may also indicate
whether suspicion might attach to the reporting person or any other person
featured in the inquiry.

____________________



             The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie — deliberate,
contrived and dishonest — but the myth — persistent, persuasive and
unrealistic.
~John F. Kennedy


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Re: COLD CASE TEAM IN MADELEINE MCCANN HUNT

Post by russiandoll on 18.03.12 17:20


18 March, from a Portuguese newspaper /magazine , title ABOLA...can only translate a little.

title : SCOTLAND YARD DEVALUES THE SPANISH INVESTIGATION ... basically the piece below seems to be saying that SY have come to the conclusion that the Spanish detectives accomplished nothing in the search for the little girl.

«Scotland Yard desvaloriza investigação de espanhóis» - JN
Por Redação


Os investigadores da Scotland Yard que voltaram a tomar contacto com o caso do desaparecimento de Madeleine McCann chegaram à conclusão que as diligências efetuadas nos últimos anos por detetives espanhóis contratados pelo casal McCann nada ou pouco vão ajudar para descobrir o que aconteceu à menina.

____________________



             The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie — deliberate,
contrived and dishonest — but the myth — persistent, persuasive and
unrealistic.
~John F. Kennedy


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Re: COLD CASE TEAM IN MADELEINE MCCANN HUNT

Post by Miraflores on 18.03.12 17:35

This is saying that Metodo 3 were rubbish? Don't we already know that?

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Re: COLD CASE TEAM IN MADELEINE MCCANN HUNT

Post by russiandoll on 18.03.12 18:18

our opinion for sure, but I posted this because if accurate it means SY have investigated the Spanish files and come to the same conclusion. I have not read anything elsewhere in the press which gives this conclusion by SY.

____________________



             The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie — deliberate,
contrived and dishonest — but the myth — persistent, persuasive and
unrealistic.
~John F. Kennedy


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Re: COLD CASE TEAM IN MADELEINE MCCANN HUNT

Post by Guest on 18.03.12 18:22

@russiandoll wrote:
18 March, from a Portuguese newspaper /magazine , title ABOLA...can only translate a little.

title : SCOTLAND YARD DEVALUES THE SPANISH INVESTIGATION ... basically the piece below seems to be saying that SY have come to the conclusion that the Spanish detectives accomplished nothing in the search for the little girl.

«Scotland Yard desvaloriza investigação de espanhóis» - JN
Por Redação


Os investigadores da Scotland Yard que voltaram a tomar contacto com o caso do desaparecimento de Madeleine McCann chegaram à conclusão que as diligências efetuadas nos últimos anos por detetives espanhóis contratados pelo casal McCann nada ou pouco vão ajudar para descobrir o que aconteceu à menina.

Thank you for bringing us that russiandoll thumbsup

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Re: COLD CASE TEAM IN MADELEINE MCCANN HUNT

Post by Kololi on 18.03.12 23:04

@Miraflores wrote:This is saying that Metodo 3 were rubbish? Don't we already know that?

Oh come on now, surely you know that our Government likes nothing better than to spend loads and loads of public money on committees and enquiries to tell the public what the public already knew by following common sense! winkwink

The sad thing is in this instance and in my opinion the money is being well spent and hopefully will bring about a conclusion one way or another for this little girl.




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Re: COLD CASE TEAM IN MADELEINE MCCANN HUNT

Post by aquila on 18.03.12 23:32

@Kololi wrote:
@Miraflores wrote:This is saying that Metodo 3 were rubbish? Don't we already know that?

Oh come on now, surely you know that our Government likes nothing better than to spend loads and loads of public money on committees and enquiries to tell the public what the public already knew by following common sense!

The sad thing is in this instance and in my opinion the money is being well spent and hopefully will bring about a conclusion one way or another for this little girl.




If justice is found for Madeleine, every single penny spent by the UK government/taxpayer will have been well worth it, unlike the millions of pounds in the Fund coffers that have produced nothing more than exponential confusion imo. The fact that SY apparently had to retrieve boxes of files from M3 is unbelievable. A company (M3) that has been CHOSEN and employed by the Fund, subsequently relieved of their duties and STILL holds files? Those files belong to the person paying for them. Those files were NOT imo the property of M3. It beats me why the Mc's didn't insist on having the files themselves - they seem to insist on controlling every other aspect of the 'investigation'.

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