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What do these words really mean ?

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What do these words really mean ?

Post by tuom on 21.07.12 1:38

I know I could look in Wiki or dictionary but I would like to know what others think these words mean ?



Jemmied , as in the shutters were jemmied



Whoosh , as in the curtains went whoosh



If I was describing the events that the above two words have been used in , I would use different words , I am Irish and not English so that may explain different words , but would like your comments on them , TY



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Re: What do these words really mean ?

Post by uppatoffee on 21.07.12 6:44

Jemmied - using some kind of tool to force the window open.

Whoosh - in the context I guess that the air from the open window blew the curtains so the billowed when the door was opened.

I think it may have been Trish in one of her interviews that clearly did not feel right using the word jemmied either.
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The meaning of 'jemmied', 'whoosh', and 'whoosh-clunk'

Post by Tony Bennett on 21.07.12 8:05

@tuom wrote:I know I could look in Wiki or dictionary but I would like to know what others think these words mean ?

Jemmied , as in the shutters were jemmied

Forced open by using a jemmy

Whoosh , as in the curtains went whoosh

Whoosh - clunk is a neologism (you'll have to look that up in the dictionary) based on Dr Kate McCann's interview in the BBC Panorama programme transmitted on 19 November 2007, with Richard Bilton as the narrator. I can't recall the exact words, but in that interview Dr Kate either referred to a sudden 'whoosh' of air which blew the curtains and slammed the door, or said 'the curtains went 'whoosh'.' It refers to a sudden movement in which something suddenly disappears. Say a jet plane flying low over your house. Or a 150mph express train hurtling through a station.

The 'clunk' comes from a peculiar, guttural kind of harsh 'click' or 'cluck' sound that Dr Kate uttered in that same broadcast with reference to her discovery that Madeleine was missing. Some people say it is a regular sound used by Scousers, Dr Kate being a Scouser, of course. At the same time, she made a wave of her hand indciating that, 'whoosh', suddenly Madeleine had vanished. This has become known as the 'whoosh-clunk' moment, and has led to the frequent use of the term 'whooshed' on Madeleine McCann discussion forums, where it usually refers to certain material on the case suddenly disappearing without trace. I am sure forum members here could give some examples.

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* From Wikipedia:

A neologism ( /nˈɒləɪzəm/; from Greek νέο- (néo-), meaning "new", and λόγος (lógos), meaning "speech, utterance") is defined as a newly coined term, word, or phrase, that may be in the process of entering common use, but has not yet been accepted into mainstream language. Neologisms are often directly attributable to a specific person, publication, period, or event. Neolexia (Greek: a "new word", or the act of creating a new word) is a fully equivalent term.

The term neologism is first attested in English in 1772, borrowed from French néologisme (1734).[1]

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Re: What do these words really mean ?

Post by aquila on 21.07.12 8:18

In the context of the shutters 'jemmied' means to me someone took a crowbar or some sort of tool to lift them. Jemmy is an old term and I don't care what Wikepedia says about it. I've heard this term many times in my life. The Americans say 'jimmied'.

Whoosh is also a word I have heard many times in my life. Once again I don't think Wikepedia is quite right here.
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Re: What do these words really mean ?

Post by Nina on 21.07.12 8:51

In my opinion they were words to add more weight and drama to what was being said. Forced open is less dramatic than jemmied open, the act of a violent criminal. Whooshed instead of curtain fluttered, again drama and violent actions of the curtain.

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Re: What do these words really mean ?

Post by Guest on 21.07.12 9:19

@Nina wrote:In my opinion they were words to add more weight and drama to what was being said. Forced open is less dramatic than jemmied open, the act of a violent criminal. Whooshed instead of curtain fluttered, again drama and violent actions of the curtain.
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Re: What do these words really mean ?

Post by tuom on 21.07.12 13:39

@Nina wrote:In my opinion they were words to add more weight and drama to what was being said. Forced open is less dramatic than jemmied open, the act of a violent criminal. Whooshed instead of curtain fluttered, again drama and violent actions of the curtain.



thank you Nina , forced open would be the word I would use, recently at my workplace there was a break in (not serious) where one small window was forced open.

"the draught" caused the door to bang , in my home if the hall window is open and the kitchen door is open and then if I open the patio door in the kitchen which has curtains , the curtains fly up in the air .



I can see that the use of different words lend more drama to events .



Thank you all .
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Re: What do these words really mean ?

Post by Nina on 21.07.12 13:42

@tuom wrote:
@Nina wrote:In my opinion they were words to add more weight and drama to what was being said. Forced open is less dramatic than jemmied open, the act of a violent criminal. Whooshed instead of curtain fluttered, again drama and violent actions of the curtain.



thank you Nina , forced open would be the word I would use, recently at my workplace there was a break in (not serious) where one small window was forced open.

"the draught" caused the door to bang , in my home if the hall window is open and the kitchen door is open and then if I open the patio door in the kitchen which has curtains , the curtains fly up in the air .



I can see that the use of different words lend more drama to events .



Thank you all .

No thanks required roses Yes we use normal language when telling something but here there clearly is a need to make a big drama. Do they think it makes it more believable? For me it just makes me thinking

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Re: What do these words really mean ?

Post by Guest on 21.07.12 13:50

The word "jemmied" immediately implies that a tool was used. Now we know there were no tool marks. Forced open means by using any means either brute force of even tools. So why was the word jemmied used.

jemmy [ˈdʒɛmɪ] US, jimmy

n pl -mies
(Engineering / Tools) a short steel crowbar used, esp by burglars, for forcing doors and windows
vb -mies, -mying, -mied
(Engineering / Tools) (tr) to prise (something) open with a jemmy

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/jemmied
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