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How our brains get overloaded by the 21st century Mm11

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How our brains get overloaded by the 21st century

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How our brains get overloaded by the 21st century Empty How our brains get overloaded by the 21st century

Post by Verdi on 09.09.19 12:21

The pace of life in the 21st Century has created “infostorms” that overwhelm our senses. Is believing in some of the sensationalist things we see actually quite a rational response?

By Tom Chatfield - 9 September 2019 
So far, so familiar. But the information suffusion of digital culture has introduced something new into this ancient psychological equation: a whole new level of reliance upon social information; and a whole new set of hazards and anxieties around errors, manipulation and cascades of influence.

Danish researchers Vincent F Hendricks and Pelle G Hansen give these tumultuous processes a name – an “information storm”, or infostorm, in the sense of a sudden and tempestuous flow of social information – and suggest an intriguing alternative to the narratives of human folly and unreason so often applied to fake news and tribal divisions online. (Read about how fake news is one of the grand challenges of our time.)

Many of the digital world’s most fractious sites are in fact the results of perfectly rational decision-making

Rather than despairingly deciding that we now live in a post-truth era ruled by irrational forces, they argue in their book Infostorms, many of the digital world’s most fractious sites are in fact the results of perfectly rational decision-making by those involved – and originate not so much in human foolishness as in the nature of information environments themselves.

Consider the spread of an item of misinformation through a social network. Once a small number of people have shared it, anyone subsequently encountering that information will face what is at root a binary choice: is what they’re looking at true, or untrue? Assuming they have no first-hand knowledge of the claim, it’s theoretically possible for them to look it up elsewhere – a process of laborious verification that involves trawling through countless claims and counter-claims. They also, however, possess a far simpler method of evaluation, which is to ask what other people seem to think.

Read on:  http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20190905-how-our-brains-get-overloaded-by-the-21st-century
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Amen to that!

A phenomenon further confounded by social media attitudes.  So frequently 'what is said' is overpowered by 'who said it'.

____________________
The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made" - Groucho Marx
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