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are our police institutionally competent?

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are our police institutionally competent?

Post by Cammerigal on 03.11.18 8:57

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/comment/our-police-are-institutionally-incompetent-lvxwbzvj7
Mathew Parish in today's Times queries if the UK police are institutionally incompetent.
I'm not sure if non subscribers can access the article...but Cammerigal concurred in the comments and cited operation grange's inability to conclude, or investigate the parents after 8 years and 12m pounds expenditure as an example of incompetency ....
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Re: are our police institutionally competent?

Post by idontbelieveit on 03.11.18 9:08

The £15m plus investigation should be made public
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Re: are our police institutionally competent?

Post by Doug D on 03.11.18 13:23

Full article below.
 
The Times adding a new approach to their pro-establishment brainwashing tactics maybe?
 
Our police are institutionally incompetent
 
Matthew Parris
 
November 3 2018, 12:01am,
 
It’s not prejudice and phobia that hamper good policing but low-calibre officers who are happy to settle for mediocrity
 
I didn’t know whether to smile or frown. Broadcast yesterday morning on Radio 4, I heard an extended interview with England’s most senior police officer, Cressida Dick, commissioner of the Metropolitan Police. She was talking about hate crime, knife crime, “historic” crime and the priorities of London’s police service. And she sounded so impressive: quick minded, well judged, mercifully classless, rational and honest.
 
So why the indecision whether to smile or frown? Because it is so rare to hear a senior police officer who inspires confidence. Unlike Ms Dick I don’t have to be discreet, so I’ll blurt out now this column’s crude assertion. I have the strongest of suspicions that Britain’s police are institutionally . . . no, not “racist”. Not “sexist” either. Nor homophobic, transphobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic or anything-phobic. None of these things. Just useless. Boneheaded. Ham-fisted. Incompetent.
 
Allowing every exception that must be made for so sweeping a statement, my impression, shared these days by many, is that our constabularies face a serious problem with individual calibre and what I might call institutional brain.
Personal and organisational low-wattage is what this column is describing.
 
I don’t think Mike Veale, the former chief constable of Wiltshire constabulary, is wicked, prejudiced or remotely corrupt. But his vendetta against the shade of Sir Edward Heath was simply idiotic; and I remain doubtful his smartphone could not be accessed by the subsequent inquiry because he had broken it when he clubbed his golf-bag by mistake. Seriously, are these people taking the mick? Mr Veale has now been made chief constable in Cleveland: a nice example of both individual and institutional incompetence.
 
I don’t know if Phil Gormley, a former Scottish chief constable, is a bully, as alleged, but I do think that when he resigned this year, effectively foreclosing the formal investigation that had been under way, one would not have expected him to pop up months later, appointed to a leading role with HM Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services, about to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of 12 police forces in the north of England.
 
I’m not sure whether (as the subsequent inquiry will consider) it was homophobia in the Met that led its investigators to make no connection between the three corpses found in the same London churchyard on different dates, or to overlook evidence offered to them, strongly suggesting a single, homophobic killer at large. But I do struggle to admire the mental processes of the officers concerned.
 
I don’t assume it was because Samson Makele was Eritrean that when in 2016 he was accused of rape in Hackney, the Met failed properly to examine his mobile phone where bedroom photographs proved that he and the complainant had had a consensual relationship, but I’m depressed that Mr Makele had to hire his own expert to retrieve the photos after the police said that his phone contained nothing of relevance. Just as I’m incredulous that after two years of mental torment Liam Allan was last year within a hair’s breadth of possible conviction for rape in Croydon because only at the last minute did the Met disclose text messages that caused the prosecution to drop the case against him. Mr Allan was neither black nor gay: his near-nemesis was not prejudice but crass incompetence.
 
You might remark that one could find similar flaws in any big organisation doing millions of things at once. But case after case brings me back to the police and points to a flawed institutional response to individual failure. There are four stages. Initial denial; subsequent inquiry; grudging apology; and then no serious consequences for the individual officers concerned.
 
All organisations have an urge to protect their own, but there’s a reason for this dominating instinct for mutual forgiveness among police officers. Almost all are doing a tough job in often adverse circumstances. So they bristle. But they shrink from the hardest word of all: mediocrity.
 
Our era has grown so strangely shy of confronting mediocrity that incompetence dare not speak its name. We take refuge in categories — racism, homophobia, misogyny, etc — but stupidity, general uselessness, “not up to the job” or “a bit lazy” are charges that so often lie beneath the indictments-by-category that are easier to make stick.
 
The biggest underlying thing wrong with Britain’s police is that they aren’t any good. And this brings me back to that interview yesterday with Ms Dick. She was asked about hate crime. She agreed with Sara Thornton, head of the National Police Chiefs’ Council, that it shouldn’t be a priority. Last week on this page I argued the same.
 
But what I can say, and Ms Dick cannot, is that our legislation on hate crime (though I question its necessity) would be perfectly operable if officers would just use their noddles. All but the most serious cases can be dealt with in ways short of arrest and charge. Instead, officers tick boxes; the box-ticking a substitute for intelligent understanding of the law’s purpose, and the individual and institutional confidence to apply it. To put it another way, officers who get tangled up pursuing nebulous complaints are either just being dim, or looking over their shoulders at dim superiors, or both.
 
Organisations can reach such a state of stupefaction that internally driven change, correction by correction, becomes impossible. Sometimes structures must be taken to pieces and rebuilt in another way; and I think we’ve reached that pass. Our policing needs remedy in three dimensions: the raw material; the systems-management; and the leadership.
Recruitment and entry should be at every level but that is no cure-all; and certainly not recruitment (as Lord Hogan-Howe, the last Met commissioner, suggested) from the military, one of Britain’s other great reservoirs of self-basting mediocrity. Entry standards should be higher, and for that, pay may need to increase.
 
Poor systems-management will never be flushed from its caves while semi-autonomous local constabularies exist: there should be a unified national police force for England and Wales, with a single, central command-structure. Leadership will find itself once there is something leadable to lead.
 
Cressida Dick worked her passage all the way up through the ranks, but I have no doubt she entered, after Oxford, with a dream in mind: the top rank. When all young recruits have been attracted by a great, unified, public service where there is scope for variety, diversity, mobility and expertise, we may begin to see again the outline emerge of the police service we once thought we had. First, though, must come the recognition that we don’t have it now.
 
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/comment/our-police-are-institutionally-incompetent-lvxwbzvj7

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Re: are our police institutionally competent?

Post by willowthewisp on 03.11.18 15:40

Hi DougD,thanks for the times article by Matthew Parris was rather tame in comparison to actual details the UK Police have been responsible for.

I do not know where to begin about the article,but if Leadership is supposed to come from the Top(Cressida Dick)then it has clearly failed by going back to the Police shooting dead of Mr Charles De Menzes,(apologies if spelt wrong) when Cressida Dick/Ian Blair was in Control?

The history of the Metropolitan Police Service goes back to many a year and during that time,they have become embroiled in many very sticky situations of Corruption,malpractice of the Laws of the UK from the 1950's upwards! 

Most of these Police Commanders or Commissioners now sit within the House of Lords on over £300.00 per day + expenses,overseeing Laws of the UK,which they failed to adhere to!

It is the entire"Establishment" thinking that needs to be changed from protecting the Guilty to protecting the innocent parties who have suffered at the hands of the Criminals.
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Re: are our police institutionally competent?

Post by sar on 07.11.18 0:34

It may be way to late if your asking "the" question

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Re: are our police institutionally competent?

Post by BlueBag on 07.11.18 8:15

Our Police are political tools.
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Re: are our police institutionally competent?

Post by Cmaryholmes on 07.11.18 12:04

@willowthewisp wrote:Hi DougD,thanks for the times article by Matthew Parris was rather tame in comparison to actual details the UK Police have been responsible for.

I do not know where to begin about the article,but if Leadership is supposed to come from the Top(Cressida Dick)then it has clearly failed by going back to the Police shooting dead of Mr Charles De Menzes,(apologies if spelt wrong) when Cressida Dick/Ian Blair was in Control?

The history of the Metropolitan Police Service goes back to many a year and during that time,they have become embroiled in many very sticky situations of Corruption,malpractice of the Laws of the UK from the 1950's upwards! 

Most of these Police Commanders or Commissioners now sit within the House of Lords on over £300.00 per day + expenses,overseeing Laws of the UK,which they failed to adhere to!

It is the entire"Establishment" thinking that needs to be changed from protecting the Guilty to protecting the innocent parties who have suffered at the hands of the Criminals.
Indeed. If I had been in charge of an operation which lead to the horrific death/murder of an innocent young man, I hope I would have the decency to take full responsibility and to step down, not calmly ,determinedly and shamelessly carry on with my career plan. The appointment of this woman to the top job was clearly a box ticking diversity exerciise.

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Re: are our police institutionally competent?

Post by skyrocket on 07.11.18 12:19

Yes, Cressida Dick - an interesting character.

Graduate of the British, shady (IMO), 'charity', Common Purpose - along with many other police officers.

https://www.cpexposed.com/graduates
https://www.cpexposed.com/

(Both links safe).

Common Purpose is probably worth a thread all of its own. The name sounds so innocuous and wholesome doesn't it......?
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