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Fake News

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Fake News

Post by Verdi on 22.01.18 12:48

This is more of a 'fake news' topic..

The (almost) complete history of 'fake news'


By Mike Wendling BBC Trending 22 January 2018

In record time, the phrase morphed from a description of a social media phenomenon into a journalistic cliche and an angry political slur. How did the term "fake news" evolve - and what's next in the world of disinformation?

It was mid-2016, and Buzzfeed's media editor, Craig Silverman, noticed a funny stream of completely made-up stories that seemed to originate from one small Eastern European town.

"We ended up finding a small cluster of news websites all registered in the same town in Macedonia called Veles," Silverman recalls.

He and a colleague started to investigate, and shortly before the US election they identified at least 140 fake news websites which were pulling in huge numbers on Facebook.

The young people in Veles may or may not have had much interest in American politics, but because of the money to be made via Facebook advertising, they wanted their fiction to travel widely on social media. The US presidential election - and specifically Donald Trump - was (and of course still is) a very hot topic on social media.

The city getting rich from fake news

And so the Macedonians and other purveyors of fakery wrote stories with headlines such as "Pope Francis Shocks World, Endorses Donald Trump for President" and "FBI Agent Suspected in Hillary Email Leaks Found Dead in Apparent Murder-Suicide".

They were completely false. And thus began the modern - and internet-friendly - life of the phrase "fake news".

Nothing new here

Misinformation, spin, lies and deceit have of course been around forever. But what Silverman and others uncovered was a unique marriage between social media algorithms, advertising systems, people prepared to make stuff up to earn some easy cash and an election that gripped a nation and much of the world.

In the wake of President Trump's victory, BBC Trending delved into the huge world of pro-Trump Facebook groups. Inside those hyper-partisan spaces there were some outright falsehoods circulating.

But most of the content was more traditional political communication: puffery, drumbeating, and opponent-slagging. There were memes showing Trump as a fearless leader, support for his pledges to deport illegal immigrants, and potted biographies describing the candidate as "the very definition of the American success story." It was hardly balanced stuff - but nor did much of it qualify as "fake news".

But pundits scrambling to explain the shock result (and in many cases, their own follies) turned to "fake news" as one possible explanation.

Enter politics

The phrase now evokes much more than those get-rich-quick Macedonian teenagers. President Trump even gave out "Fake News Awards" to reporters who had made errors or poor predictions - with a special nod to all reporting on the ongoing and very real investigations into collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

But to say that President Trump was the first politician to deploy the term would itself be, well, "fake news".

On 8 December 2016, Hillary Clinton made a speech in which she mentioned "the epidemic of malicious fake news and false propaganda that flooded social media over the past year."

"It's now clear that so-called fake news can have real-world consequences," she said. "This isn't about politics or partisanship. Lives are at risk… lives of ordinary people just trying to go about their days, to do their jobs, contribute to their communities."

Some journalists at the time interpreted her remarks as a reference to "Pizzagate", a bonkers conspiracy theory which sprouted and grew to tremendous proportions online.

It started with a rumour that sex slaves were being held under a Washington pizza restaurant, and ended a couple of days before Clinton's speech, when a man entered the busy family-friendly restaurant with a rifle. Nobody was injured, and the man was arrested and sentenced to four years in jail.

But in that speech, Clinton also asked her audience to help "protect our democracy". Other reporters interpreted that more broadly as a reference to the election.

President-elect Trump took up the phrase the following month, in January 2017, a little over a week before taking office. In response to a question, he said "you're fake news" to CNN reporter Jim Acosta. Around the same time he started repeating the phrase on Twitter.

"That signalled to the many people out there who were supporting Trump and running websites supportive of him, that he was saying 'OK, we're going to take this term and make it ours'," Silverman says.

The fake news horse had not just bolted from the stable, it was off and running.

Useless words?

Since then phrase has been used more or less continuously by Trump and other world leaders, as well as by countless political operatives, journalists and ordinary people. As a rough guide, a Google News search of "fake news" throws up 5 million results, and already in 2018 the phrase has been used about two million times on Twitter.

And, contrary to the conventional wisdom, it's no longer a stream of falsehoods eagerly swallowed solely by Trump supporters and/or those with little education. By April 2017, Trending was reporting on the phenomenon of left-wing, anti-Trump fakery. Experts say highly-educated people can be duped by lies as well - and can often be more stubborn when presented with information that challenges their views.

But within months the sheer ubiquity of the phrase "fake news" had perhaps rendered the term meaningless. All sorts of things - misinformation, spin, conspiracy theories, mistakes, and reporting that people just don't like - have been rolled into it.

How fake news plagued 2017

"We did this to ourselves, and by 'we', I mean the media," says Alexios Mantzarlis, director of the Poynter Institute's International Fact-Checking Network. "Right after the election, in editorials, in news articles, we started calling 'fake news' a bit of everything.

"We should be conscious that our industry is partly to blame for the confusion we're at."

And some experts with huge experience in the field have started to back away from the fake news fire altogether.

"The reason I don't like the phrase now is it's used as a term to describe everything," says Clare Wardle of First Draft News, a truth-seeking non-profit based at Harvard's Shorenstein Centre. "Whether it's a sponsored post, an ad, a visual meme, a bot on Twitter, a rumour - people just use it against any information they don't like."

"This is a really complex problem," she says. "If we're going to start thinking of ways we can intervene, we're going to have to have clear definitions."

Wardle says that an obsession with the phrase (and yes, this story admittedly might be a part of that) is actually hurting the credibility of otherwise credible news outlets.

"My concern now is the kind of reporting we see on disinformation," says Clare Wardle. "People are saying, 'I don't know who to believe or who to trust, everything's broken.' My concern is the way that we're talking about some of these issues is actually doing more than the original misinformation did in the first place."

Mantzarlis says that while he's concerned about language creep, he isn't ready to abandon it altogether - although he would like to see "fake news" restricted to descriptions of spammy made-up stories wrecking Facebook news feeds.

"Just because someone else is using the term to mean something different doesn't mean it loses its value," he says. "If someone starts calling a telephone a banana, and has a very big megaphone, doesn't mean that the rest of us should stop calling a telephone a telephone."

Going viral

Clearly the enabler of the modern form of "fake news" - or, if you like, misinformation - has been the explosive growth of social media.

"In the early days of Twitter, people would call it a 'self-cleaning oven', because yes there were falsehoods, but the community would quickly debunk them," Wardle says. "But now we're at a scale where if you add in automation and bots, that oven is overwhelmed.

"There are many more people now acting as fact-checking and trying to clean all the ovens, but it's at a scale now that we just can't keep up."

So what to do about it? Fact-checking works, says Alexios Mantzarlis, but automated solutions are probably not the answer.

"We're been heralding robotic fact checking for about 20 years and we're nowhere near it," he says. "What we can do is help humans and journalists find fishy claims faster, and get access to the stats that they need to verify a claim faster."

"I see an enormous potential in technology as an assistant and turbocharger of fact-checking," he says. "I see very little use in technology as a one-size-fits all universal fixer of this problem."

But all the fact-checking institutions in the world will never be able to beat down every rumour or fake "fact". And while some media reports have cast doubt on the efficacy of fact-checking, Mantzarlis is convinced that his work has an impact.

"What we've seen over the past two years is that consistently, across the board, regardless of partisanship, when people get told a falsehood and get presented with a correction, their belief in the falsehood goes down," he says.

People might be "fact resistant", but very few are "fact immune", he says.
The future of fake

In the future, the term "fake news" might come to be seen as a relic of a febrile 2017 (if we're lucky). But the fight against misinformation won't go away. Companies and governments are now starting to take concrete action, the consequences of which will be felt for some time.

"Google and Facebook have both said that they are going to be hiring a lot of people to review content and enforce their terms of service and keep fake and illegal stuff off their platform. I'm interested to see how that is actually done," Buzzfeed's Silverman says.

"The opaqueness of these platforms and their power and the fact that so much speech has moved on to them is something that we need to pay attention to and make sure that we don't turn them from places where misinformation is running rampant to places that are so locked down that they are inhibiting speech," he says.

Alongside worries about the power of the social media companies, the experts also have concerns about the power of governments.

"Sometimes well-intentioned but ill-informed legislators will overreach and do more harm that the problem they are trying to fix, with legislation on fake news," Mantzarlis says, noting that legislation is being proposed in several countries across Europe.

The most sweeping such legislation came into effect on 1 January in Germany. The law demands that social media sites quickly remove hate speech, fake news and illegal material or face fines up to 50m euro (£44.3m, $61.1m).

And beyond viral political text news stories, there are new frontiers which fact-checkers are trying to delve into.

"I really think we need to be thinking of visuals more. Visuals are very powerful vehicles of disinformation," Claire Wardle says.

Often photos are travelling with rapid speed on closed messaging apps such as WhatsApp or Viber. And while the discussion about "fake news" has focused on the West, a lot of misinformation like this is circulating about health, religion and society outside of the US, in developing countries.

"The power of something like WhatsApp is that it's travelling between very close networks of peers who are much more likely to trust each other," Wardle says.

Impact?

There's one essential question - what impact does misinformation really have in the minds of voters? Ever since the debate over the issue really took off a little over a year ago, there's been enormous disagreement as to whether false stories spread online actually have any impact on people's politics or voting patterns.

In one of the first academic studies about the consumption of fake news, researchers at Princeton, Dartmouth and the University of Exeter estimated that about 25 percent of Americans visited a fake news website in a six-week period around the time of the 2016 US election.

But the researchers also found that the visits were highly concentrated - 10% of readers made 60% of the visits. And crucially, the researchers concluded "fake news does not crowd out hard news consumption."

"The reach was relatively wide, but not so deep," Mantzarlis says. "It's quite a big step further to say, are people voting on this, making decisions on it."

"To say it's poisoning our democracy or it won this guy or the other guy an election, we need a lot more research to be able to say that."

http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-42724320

I sense a new government department coming on.  'The Ministry of Misinformation', - otherwise known as 'The Media Misinformation Monitoring Unit'.

Clarence - come out come out wherever you are !!!

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Re: Fake News

Post by BlueBag on 22.01.18 13:09

"Fake news" has morphed into anything the Political classes don't want us to hear.

Some of it is fake news (created by who? it's a dirty game).

Some of it is alternative views and opinions - not fake.

What will happen is more internet control and more official fake news.
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Re: Fake News

Post by sar on 22.01.18 17:53

+1 BB

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Re: Fake News

Post by BlueBag on 23.01.18 18:33

It begins.

Government announces anti-fake news unit

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-42791218
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Re: Fake News

Post by Verdi on 23.01.18 21:19

big grin   Not often wrong but right again specs

I suggest a redesignation .... The Ministry of Silly Talks.

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Re: Fake News

Post by loopzdaloop on 24.01.18 2:27

Fight all censorship. Fake News helped Mr Blair take us to war, and this was the establishment. There was a release from the secret files how the intelligence agencies were planting Sadam is bad type stories in the media in order to make a case for war and gain control of the oil. This is the same media lies that resulted in a good man (Dr David Kelly) being found dead.
Is there a thread on here about Dr David Kelly and peoples views on this case? I can't recall.
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Re: Fake News

Post by BlueBag on 24.01.18 8:56

@BlueBag wrote:It begins.

Government announces anti-fake news unit

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-42791218

Jesus had a saying.... "physician, heal thyself".
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Re: Fake News

Post by BlueBag on 24.01.18 9:06

The penny just dropped.

This is actually the Government setting up a "Ministry of Truth".

It's even doublespeak.

It's real.
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Re: Fake News

Post by Jill Havern on 24.01.18 9:30

@loopzdaloop wrote:Fight all censorship. Fake News helped Mr Blair take us to war, and this was the establishment. There was a release from the secret files how the intelligence agencies were planting Sadam is bad type stories in the media in order to make a case for war and gain control of the oil. This is the same media lies that resulted in a good man (Dr David Kelly) being found dead.
Is there a thread on here about Dr David Kelly and peoples views on this case? I can't recall.
There are three threads:

Ten years ago (yesterday), Dr Kelly's body was found. The subsequent cover-up is one of the great scandals of our age

Dr. David Kelly -

The baffling death of Dr David Kelly - Why does so much remain hidden?
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Re: Fake News

Post by Mark Willis on 24.01.18 10:50

@BlueBag wrote:The penny just dropped.

This is actually the Government setting up a "Ministry of Truth".

It's even doublespeak.

It's real.
Yes. And we have walked into it under the surveillance of more CCTV cameras per capita than any other nation.
No more specific genders, no paying of compliments without being deemed some sort of "-ist", everything you were once taught in your formative years transformed into melting snowflakes...
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Re: Fake News

Post by Verdi on 24.01.18 12:01

The BBC are getting well and truly stuck in - well, they would know all about it wouldn't they..

While some conspiracy theories are largely harmless, others have damaging ripple-effects. With new insights, researchers are getting closer to understanding why so many people believe things which are not true.

By Melissa Hogenboom

24 January 2018

In certain pockets of America, measles diagnoses have been spreading at previously unprecented rates.

In 2017 there were 58 confirmed cases of the illness in Minnesota – the largest outbreak the state had seen in 30 years. Similarly, in 2008, a large outbreak occurred in California, which was thought to originate from a seven-year-old boy, who had not been vaccinated.

Less than a decade earlier, measles had been largely eliminated in the US. The gradual resurgence can, researchers say, be directly attributed to people who were not vaccinated.

Before measles vaccinations were introduced in 1963, the illness could be deadly. In the 1960s, there were several million cases, thousands of hospitalisations and 500 deaths per year. Meanwhile in Australia, a 2016 report concluded that 23 deaths from a host of diseases could have been prevented by vaccination between 2005 and 2014. And what’s more, such vaccinations were readily available.

   Lies, propaganda and fake news: A challenge for our age
   The labs that protect against online warfare
   How to avoid falling for lies and fake news

Those that do not vaccinate often choose not to. They are called “anti-vaxxers” and they largely believe that vaccinations are harmful – and, often, that pharmaceutical companies (and others) cover up damaging effects of vaccinations. It is but one of many conspiracy theories that flies in the face of scientific evidence – a quick internet search throws up hundreds.

Similarly, climate change deniers are convinced that the Earth is not warming, and some say that scientists are tweaking evidence to make it appear so. Those that believe in one conspiracy, are in turn more susceptible to believing others.

While some conspiracy theories are relatively harmless – the argument that Nasa faked the Moon landing, or bizarrely, that Beatle Sir Paul McCartney died long ago with a doppelganger taking his place ever since – others have damaging ripple-effects.

With new insights, researchers are getting closer to understanding more of the factors involved. This will, they hope, help mitigate some of the very real dangers and societal divides that conspiracy theories encourage.

There is nothing new about conspiracy theories. As early as the 3rd Century BC, a once-lost Gospel of Philip purported that Jesus and Mary Magdalen were married, a myth which has been perpetuated in popular fiction, such as The Da Vinci Code. Some trace the mysterious brain-washing Illuminati conspiracy to a secret society in 1776, but that society was nothing like the ‘Illuminati’ of today. More recently, some even deny that the Holocaust happened. Despite the harrowing evidence, they maintain that the Nazis did not kill six million Jews during World War Two.

The question psychologists like Karen Douglas, a professor at the University of Kent, ask themselves is why do such beliefs persist?

There is no simple answer. Considering the range of conspiracy theories that abound and the fact that up to half of all US citizens believe at least one of them, there is no immediate set of unifying traits that makes up a “profile” of such a person. Who hasn’t at some point wanted to believe that a deceased favourite artist might still be alive? Elvis Presley and Tupac Shakur have both been subjects of such debate.

“On some level, we are all predisposed to be suspicious or mistrustful of government,” says Douglas. That we are wary of groups or people we do not understand makes sense from an evolutionary perspective. “In some ways, it is quite adaptive to be suspicious of other groups for your own personal safety,” she says.

But when Douglas probed a little deeper, she started to uncover a smorgasbord of explanations for why some people are more drawn to conspiracies than others. For one, they seem to have an intrinsic and almost narcissistic need for uniqueness, one study showed. This is the idea that a person feels like they have access to scarce information or alternative ‘secret’ explanations about certain world events, such as the January 2015 Charlie Hebdo shootings in Paris. As the scholar and author Michael Billig put it in 1984: “The conspiracy theory offers the chance of hidden, important, and immediate knowledge, so that the believer can become an expert, possessed of a knowledge not held even by the so-called experts.” Douglas’ work has now shown what Billig alluded to.

Other studies reveal that conspiracy theories help people make sense of the world when they feel out of control, are anxious or feel powerless if their needs are threatened. People can find it difficult to accept that we live in a world where random acts of violence, such as mass-murder, can take place. That is why, says University of Bristol professor of psychology Stephan Lewandowsky, it can be psychologically comforting for some to believe that “powerful people” are behind random events. People are literally “addicted to answers,” according to one study.

Take the 2017 Las Vegas shooting, the deadliest mass-shooting in US history in which 58 people were killed. It has been blamed on Muslim terrorists, the violent group Antifa, and it has been suggested it was  part of an Illuminati blood-sacrifice ritual. The fact-checking website Snopes has a longer list of falsehoods it has debunked. “We do not like the idea that out of the blue something terrible can happen, therefore, it is psychologically comforting for some people to believe in a well-organised conspiracy of powerful people who are responsible for those events,” says Lewandowsky.

Upbringing may also play a role in world beliefs. Individuals who grew up insecurely attached to their parents – where they experienced a negative relationship with one or both of them, also seem to be more likely to support conspiracy theories. That’s according to a study being published in April 2018 in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.

“These people exaggerate threats compared to others,” explains Douglas, in part because they use an inflated perception of global threats as a coping mechanism. “They help people explain or justify their anxieties." Whether or not it works is another matter. The current evidence at least, suggests it does not help with anxiety. It might even make people feel less in control. In fact, conspiracy theories can make people feel more uncertain, powerless, and disillusioned. Once in that state, they are then also more likely to continue believing them.

That so many people do choose to believe conspiracy theories, comes with potentially dangerous consequences, despite the fact that some are absurdly silly or even comical.

People who are party to them feel more disengaged politically and are therefore less likely to vote. Climate sceptics are also less inclined to reduce their carbon footprint and support the politicians who promise to do so. Similarly, anti-vaxxers contribute to the spread of disease, which can harm and even kill the very young or those with compromised immune systems. These are the very real effects of an age where there is a “blizzard of misinformation” out there, says Lewandowsky, where the nobility of truth itself is being undermined.

There does not seem to be an easy way for the truth to rule supreme. Frustratingly for scientists, presenting accurate facts which “disprove” a conspiracy theory does not usually help. In fact, it can even make a false belief stronger. Lewandowsky found that the stronger a person believes in a conspiracy, the less likely they are to trust scientific facts. It is more likely they will think the person attempting to reason with them is in on it. “What that means is that any evidence against a conspiracy theory is reinterpreted as evidence in favour of it.” The rejection of science is, in part, fuelled by conspiracy theorists, he further found.

One study looking at how conspiracy theories spread online, revealed that there is no overlap between those who share scientific news, and those who share conspiracies or fake news. “We are living in separate echo chambers,” says physicist David Grimes, from Queens University, Belfast. He was so frequently trolled by conspiracy theorists in his science writing that he developed an algorithm to show how unlikely it is that big secrets can be kept for any significant length of time. The more people involved in a cover-up, the quicker it would unravel, he showed.

“We all share a single world, and the consequences of what we decide from a policy or ethics perspective, affect all of us. If we cannot even agree on basic science, things that shouldn’t even be controversial, we [will] have serious problems making decisions,” says Grimes.

While there may not be a single solution, research looking into the psychology behind conspiracy theory participation is a start. We now know that a person’s ideology is often related to their beliefs. The strongest predictor of climate denial, for instance, is a free-market ideology, Lewandowsky discovered. Through the work of Douglas and others, we now also know many of the traits that make people more susceptible to believing something without evidence. We need to realise that we are “drawn to patterns,” even when there are none, says Grimes. “The reality is, we live in a stochastic Universe. It’s tempting to draw a narrative, but there’s no narrative, there are no waves, we are joining dots in the sand,” says Grimes.

Although technology has created the many echo chambers and filter bubbles we see today, it could also help overcome them. One pioneering experiment in Norway introduced a quiz to make sure the person understood what they had read before they were able to comment on an article. This might help people “calm down” before distributing random noise, says Lewandowsky, but at the same time it is not censoring anyone from having a voice.

Another strategy that could help is educating people to better understand trusted sources, as well as holding public figures to account when they spread misinformation. Several fact-checking websites and journalists already attempt to do this, but it doesn’t always work. Grimes has found that people set in their beliefs are unlikely to change their opinions, but those who “aren’t fully committed” can be swayed when presented with evidence. That, he hopes, means we can overturn many conspiracies if people are provided with compelling, fact-based evidence.

Lastly, we can all look more closely at what we share on social media ourselves. People often share a clever-sounding headline without actually reading the contents of the article.

“We’ve got the information of the world at our finger tips and yet we’re obsessed with empty fictions,” says Grimes. That’s exactly how misinformation and conspiracy theories can so easily spread.

This means that we really cannot always believe what we read and hear. If something sounds peculiar or contrived, chances are it might well be. If you are aware of just how many conspiracy theories circulate, then you are already ahead of the game in preventing them from spreading further.

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180124-the-enduring-appeal-of-conspiracy-theories

Where would the world be today if not for the probing mind of the conspiratorial contemporary psychologist.  They who know bugger all about how the human mind really works but can still waffle on with their theorizing ad-infinitum.  It's no wonder so many folk are a bit unhinged - I blame the psychologist but that's probably just a conspiracy theory I heard over the garden fence  smilie .

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Re: Fake News

Post by Verdi on 24.01.18 12:16

@Mark Willis wrote:
@BlueBag wrote:The penny just dropped.

This is actually the Government setting up a "Ministry of Truth".

It's even doublespeak.

It's real.
Yes. And we have walked into it under the surveillance of more CCTV cameras per capita than any other nation.
No more specific genders, no paying of compliments without being deemed some sort of "-ist", everything you were once taught in your formative years transformed into melting snowflakes...

Take solace in the fact there has been no mention of a 'Think Tank'.

I believe this current trend of being an ist'ist stems from the feminist movement and the consequent uprising of lesbianism - that by the way is an 'ism.

These nefarious influences, woman has forgotten what it's like to be woman - the be feminine and totally comfortable with their sex and identity. I can remember a time when women loved to be admired by the opposite sex, they dressed to attract the opposite sex (still do, only the reaction differs). So what if a bloke working on a building site wolf whistles a passing female - so what if a passing female eyes up the bloke working on the building site?

Harmless flirting - It makes the world go round. What's with these people, I wish someone, just one, would eye me up sad .

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Re: Fake News

Post by BlueBag on 24.01.18 12:29

What we are seeing is totally Orwellian.

It's like watching Mao's Cultural Revolution creeping towards us.
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Re: Fake News

Post by Mark Willis on 24.01.18 12:33

@Verdi wrote:
@Mark Willis wrote:
@BlueBag wrote:The penny just dropped.

This is actually the Government setting up a "Ministry of Truth".

It's even doublespeak.

It's real.
Yes. And we have walked into it under the surveillance of more CCTV cameras per capita than any other nation.
No more specific genders, no paying of compliments without being deemed some sort of "-ist", everything you were once taught in your formative years transformed into melting snowflakes...

Take solace in the fact there has been no mention of a 'Think Tank'.
Good point. That would require a thought process likened to that of a normal human being.

I believe this current trend of being an ist'ist stems from the feminist movement and the consequent uprising of lesbianism - that by the way is an 'ism.
Ism-schism. Since when did we allow all these refugees from Lesbos?

These nefarious influences, woman has forgotten what it's like to be woman - the be feminine and totally comfortable with their sex and identity.  I can remember a time when women loved to be admired by the opposite sex, they dressed to attract the opposite sex (still do, only the reaction differs).  So what if a bloke working on a building site wolf whistles a passing female - so what if a passing female eyes up the bloke working on the building site?
You know, if we translated ourselves from the 60s and 70s into today we would be had up on so many thought police felonies they'd throw away the key.

Harmless flirting - It makes the world go round.  What's with these people, I wish someone, just one, would eye me up sad .
I know you. You'd just stoop down, pick that eye up, and roll it right back to her.  winkwink
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Re: Fake News

Post by Mark Willis on 24.01.18 12:36

@BlueBag wrote:What we are seeing is totally Orwellian.

It's like watching Mao's Cultural Revolution creeping towards us.
Orwell. Prophetic. All so fanciful when he wrote that.
To have it realised in my lifetime is dispiriting, to say the least.
We had glimpses early on when kids took charge of the classroom.
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Re: Fake News

Post by Verdi on 24.01.18 15:40

Well I never, a class act from his Paypalness. Never far from the bandwagon..

Pope says serpent temptation in Bible 'first fake news'

Pope Francis has denounced the "snake tactics" of those who spread fake news, saying the first case of misinformation is in the Bible when Eve is tempted by the serpent to eat the forbidden fruit.

The episode showed the "dire consequences" that fake news can have, the Pope warned in a document.

Francis also said it led only to the spread of arrogance and hatred.

He urged social media users and journalists to unmask manipulative tactics that foment division.

Read on - if you must..

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-42802295

As Bluebag suggested up-page - physician heal thyself!

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The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made" - Groucho Marx
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Re: Fake News

Post by Mark Willis on 24.01.18 17:48

You know what? I reckon my first inclination something wasn't quite kosher would have been when a snake started talking to me.
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Re: Fake News

Post by BlueBag on 24.01.18 18:52

@Mark Willis wrote:You know what? I reckon my first inclination something wasn't quite kosher would have been when a snake started talking to me.
Nope.

You see you didn't know what good and evil was until after you ate the apple.

At which point God punished you.

Even though you couldn't know it was bad.

This was before God created logic of course (or rainbows).
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Re: Fake News

Post by Mark Willis on 24.01.18 19:13

@BlueBag wrote:
@Mark Willis wrote:You know what? I reckon my first inclination something wasn't quite kosher would have been when a snake started talking to me.
Nope.

You see you didn't know what good and evil was until after you ate the apple.

At which point God punished you.

Even though you couldn't know it was bad.

This was before God created logic of course (or rainbows).
Good point. Bit mean on God's part, you ask me. Given the snake is one of God's all creatures.
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Re: Fake News

Post by polyenne on 25.01.18 12:41

I'll add this to Fake News.....seems appropriate  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3GMAYEaI-0

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Re: Fake News

Post by polyenne on 13.02.18 16:32

So, in the news today......
Trumps daughter-in-law, Vanessa, opens an envelope sent to her husband 
A white powder comes out
She felt “nauseous” after opening the envelope
She & another person were taken to a local hospital “as a precaution”
A team, trained in hazardous materials and decontamination procedures is sent in
It was cornflour

Vanessa has obviously not cooked in her 40 years on a God’s Earth

Move along now, nothing to see here......

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Re: Fake News

Post by BlueBag on 13.02.18 21:16

If I was in American politics and I opened an envelope with white powder in it I would feel ill and would want precautions taken.

You know.. you might think it was Osama Bin Laden again (back from the dead for the second time) up to his 9/11 tricks...

No wait... that was military grade Anthrax made in a US lab.

Silly me.

The 9/11 Investigation managed to forget all about the Anthrax stuff and so should we because we are good sheep citizens.
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Re: Fake News

Post by polyenne on 13.02.18 21:37

It was cornflour, it should have given her a lift !!

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Re: Fake News

Post by polyenne on 26.02.18 13:48

An interesting video if you've 40 minutes or so to spare...............https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWXAQpPR4PQ

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Re: Fake News

Post by MayMuse on 26.02.18 14:17

@polyenne wrote:An interesting video if you've 40 minutes or so to spare...............https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWXAQpPR4PQ
Do you mean this one.... I've watched it before , it's an excellent video.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-459316/Madeleine-Is-Robert-Murat-suspect-scapegoat.html

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