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What Really Happened to Stuart Lubbock? - book by Tony Bennett

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What Really Happened to Stuart Lubbock? - book by Tony Bennett

Post by Get'emGonçalo on 27.10.16 16:32

What Really Happened to Stuart Lubbock? - book by Tony Bennett  


The media is currently full of stories of Michael Barrymore being compensated by Essex Police for wrongful arrest. These stories continue to suggest that Stuart Lubbock died whilst swimming in Michael Barrymore's swimming pool.


But many years ago, founder-member of CMOMM Tony Bennett wrote a book on the case: "Not Awight: Getting Away With Murder". Tony, as most here will know, is also the author of the now-banned book: 'What  Really Happened to Madeleine McCann?"


In his book on the killing of Stuart Lubbock, Tony presents very strong evidence that Stuart Lubbock was never in Barrymore's swimming pool, but was subjected to a vicious rape which killed him, following which the perpetrators rapidly concocted a false accident scenario. The book includes the medical evidence from three top pathologists who were certain that Stuart died from multiple injuries, asphyxiation and a heart attack, not drowning.


Tony has also spent the past 9 years bringing to national prominence the killing in 2002 of Lee Balkwell, which his father maintains was a murder - covered up by creating another false accident scenario.


"Not Awight: Getting Away with Murder" is a comprehensive, 404-page analysis of how Stuart Lubbock was killed and of the cover-up which followed. Tony is now selling the book at the reduced price of £7.50 inc. postage etc.


Any sales will help Tony to offset the £125 a month he continues to be required to send to Carter-Ruck by Standing Order each month, and which he must pay until May 2023, when he will be nearly 76 years old.


If you would like to support Tony by buying one of his books then payments by cheque or PO can be sent directly to Anthony Bennett, 66 Chippingfield, HARLOW, Essex, CM17 0DJ.
 
Tel 01279 635789 or e-mail Tony at ajsbennett@btinternet.com
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Re: What Really Happened to Stuart Lubbock? - book by Tony Bennett

Post by Get'emGonçalo on 28.10.16 6:23

I just want to add a bit more to this thread after I looked on Amazon for Tony's book and found an horrendous list of prices ranging from an eye-watering £36.49 to a staggering £230.99 !! Shocked



Tony had this to say:

As explained to you by e-mail, it is not me trying to sell my book on Amazon, it will be someone called Harry Cichy.

For anyone not aware, I wrote the entire book, wrote up Terry Lubbock's story (first 4 chapters of my book), typed it all up myself, did all the negotiations, got all the photos together, l liaised with the printers all the way through - did everything in fact - even wrote Harry Cichy's foreword for him.

At the time the book was published, the book was the product of The Lubbock Trust, basically Terry Lubbock, a self-styled 'publicist', Harry Cichy, and myself. It was not a charity, by the way, and we never appealed for funds. 

When two leading newspapers (News of the World and Daily Mail) serialised my book, the money was shared equally as agreed.

A few weeks before publication, I said we needed to get an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) for it. Harry Cichy then piped up: "I've already got some ISBN numbers, you can use one of mine".

It sounded like a reasonable and honest offer - but it was part of a sting. 

We had agreed to price up the book at £9.99. We had plans for its sale and distribution.

When my book was ready to be delivered, however, Cichy and Terry Lubbock told me: "Harry is the sole publisher, you have no rights in the book". They wanted the Lubbock Trust wound up, which it was.  

I was truly stunned, knocked out by this.

So the sale of my book on Amazon has nothing whatsoever to do with me. I suspect Lubbock and Cichy (mainly Cichy) have made a lot of money out of it.

Neither Lubbock nor Cichy had any income apart from welfare benefits, so it was not worth the effort to sue them.

I did manage to get 300 books out of them to sell and the majority of those have gone by now.
 
They were two seriously ungrateful, greedy people.

I ask myself if it was all worthwhile when I read headlines like: 'BARRYMORE CLEARED OVER POOL DEATH" - having proved beyond doubt in my book, I think, that Stuart had never been in that outside pool on that cold, March night. 

But I think I got much, much closer to the truth than anyone else has ever done. UNQUOTE
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Re: What Really Happened to Stuart Lubbock? - book by Tony Bennett

Post by sar on 28.10.16 10:42

Hi Tony, my heart goes out to you.  Sounds like you have been treated awfully.  I have been in some terrible situations as a result of actions of friends, family and business associates.  Some of which I don't think I'll ever get over.  Sometimes I think there is little or nothing that can provide comfort.  Just "soldiering on" doesn't seem good enough - unless you signed up for the army??  For a number of years I have been rebuilding my life, much of it from scratch.  It has been a painful process but things are very slowly / cautiously improving.  I take comfort from things that usually don't cost much, like going for a walk, speaking to people, stroking a dog or a cat, helping people if I can, maybe going to an art gallery or watching a film.  (This forum has been a great source of interaction and stimulation) I have significantly pegged back my expectations of life and broadly speaking, this has lead to a much happier and less stressful frightening life.  I sincerely hope you continue your work and contributions as they are greatly needed and I'm sure appreciated by many.

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Re: What Really Happened to Stuart Lubbock? - book by Tony Bennett

Post by aquila on 28.10.16 15:24

@sar wrote:Hi Tony, my heart goes out to you.  Sounds like you have been treated awfully.  I have been in some terrible situations as a result of actions of friends, family and business associates.  Some of which I don't think I'll ever get over.  Sometimes I think there is little or nothing that can provide comfort.  Just "soldiering on" doesn't seem good enough - unless you signed up for the army??  For a number of years I have been rebuilding my life, much of it from scratch.  It has been a painful process but things are very slowly / cautiously improving.  I take comfort from things that usually don't cost much, like going for a walk, speaking to people, stroking a dog or a cat, helping people if I can, maybe going to an art gallery or watching a film.  (This forum has been a great source of interaction and stimulation) I have significantly pegged back my expectations of life and broadly speaking, this has lead to a much happier and less stressful frightening life.  I sincerely hope you continue your work and contributions as they are greatly needed and I'm sure appreciated by many.
I just want to say sar, huge respect from me to you.
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Re: What Really Happened to Stuart Lubbock? - book by Tony Bennett

Post by Verdi on 28.10.16 20:21

@sar wrote:Hi Tony, my heart goes out to you.  Sounds like you have been treated awfully.  I have been in some terrible situations as a result of actions of friends, family and business associates.  Some of which I don't think I'll ever get over.  Sometimes I think there is little or nothing that can provide comfort.  Just "soldiering on" doesn't seem good enough - unless you signed up for the army??  For a number of years I have been rebuilding my life, much of it from scratch.  It has been a painful process but things are very slowly / cautiously improving.  I take comfort from things that usually don't cost much, like going for a walk, speaking to people, stroking a dog or a cat, helping people if I can, maybe going to an art gallery or watching a film.  (This forum has been a great source of interaction and stimulation) I have significantly pegged back my expectations of life and broadly speaking, this has lead to a much happier and less stressful frightening life.  I sincerely hope you continue your work and contributions as they are greatly needed and I'm sure appreciated by many.
All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms;
And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lin’d,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper’d pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well sav’d, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion;
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

'As You Like It'  William Shakespeare

roses

____________________
The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made" - Groucho Marx
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Re: What Really Happened to Stuart Lubbock? - book by Tony Bennett

Post by Verdi on 28.10.16 20:40

@Get'emGonçalo wrote:

In his book on the killing of Stuart Lubbock, Tony presents very strong evidence that Stuart Lubbock was never in Barrymore's swimming pool, but was subjected to a vicious rape which killed him, following which the perpetrators rapidly concocted a false accident scenario. The book includes the medical evidence from three top pathologists who were certain that Stuart died from multiple injuries, asphyxiation and a heart attack, not drowning.


This brings me back to 'Autopsy - The Last Hours Of...' television production presented by Dr Richard Shepherd and Dr James Payne-James. 

For an inveterate cynic the production is not only fascinating but also shows how easy it is to produce the 'right' conclusion for the 'wrong' reason.  Every man has his price as they say - the battle field is fought on equal standing but trying to battle money is a whole different ball game.

I greatly admire Tony Bennett for his tenacity.

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The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made" - Groucho Marx
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Re: What Really Happened to Stuart Lubbock? - book by Tony Bennett

Post by sar on 29.10.16 23:32

@Verdi wrote:
@sar wrote:Hi Tony, my heart goes out to you.  Sounds like you have been treated awfully.  I have been in some terrible situations as a result of actions of friends, family and business associates.  Some of which I don't think I'll ever get over.  Sometimes I think there is little or nothing that can provide comfort.  Just "soldiering on" doesn't seem good enough - unless you signed up for the army??  For a number of years I have been rebuilding my life, much of it from scratch.  It has been a painful process but things are very slowly / cautiously improving.  I take comfort from things that usually don't cost much, like going for a walk, speaking to people, stroking a dog or a cat, helping people if I can, maybe going to an art gallery or watching a film.  (This forum has been a great source of interaction and stimulation) I have significantly pegged back my expectations of life and broadly speaking, this has lead to a much happier and less stressful frightening life.  I sincerely hope you continue your work and contributions as they are greatly needed and I'm sure appreciated by many.
All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms;
And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lin’d,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper’d pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well sav’d, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion;
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

'As You Like It'  William Shakespeare

roses
thanks Verdi, wonderful and greatly appreciated!

sar

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