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BBC Charter - OFCOM Rules - The Crimewatch broadcast 14 October 2013 - Truth, accuracy, fairness and impartiality in broadcasting

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BBC Charter - OFCOM Rules - The Crimewatch broadcast 14 October 2013 - Truth, accuracy, fairness and impartiality in broadcasting

Post by Tony Bennett on 08.10.13 7:56

On the subject of the BBC Charter, raised in PeterMac's letter 'Open Letter to Crimewatch', it's relevant to quote a few extracts from it:

1.2.1 Trust

Trust is the foundation of the BBC: we are independent, impartial and honest.  We are committed to achieving the highest standards of due accuracy and impartiality and strive to avoid knowingly and materially misleading our audiences.  

1.2.2 Truth and Accuracy

We seek to establish the truth of what has happened and are committed to achieving due accuracy in all our output.  Accuracy is not simply a matter of getting facts right; when necessary, we will weigh relevant facts and information to get at the truth.  Our output, as appropriate to its subject and nature, will be well sourced, based on sound evidence, thoroughly tested and presented in clear, precise language.  We will strive to be honest and open about what we don't know and avoid unfounded speculation.

1.2.3 Impartiality

Impartiality lies at the core of the BBC's commitment to its audiences.  We will apply due impartiality to all our subject matter and will reflect a breadth and diversity of opinion across our output as a whole, over an appropriate period, so that no significant strand of thought is knowingly unreflected or under-represented.  We will be fair and open-minded when examining evidence and weighing material facts.  

1.2.4 Editorial Integrity and Independence

The BBC is independent of outside interests and arrangements that could undermine our editorial integrity. Our audiences should be confident that our decisions are not influenced by outside interests, political or commercial pressures, or any personal interests.  

1.2.6 Serving the Public Interest

We seek to report stories of significance to our audiences.  We will be rigorous in establishing the truth of the story and well informed when explaining it.  Our specialist expertise will bring authority and analysis to the complex world in which we live.  We will ask searching questions of those who hold public office and others who are accountable, and provide a comprehensive forum for public debate.

1.2.7 Fairness

Our output will be based on fairness, openness, honesty and straight dealing.  Contributors and audiences will be treated with respect.  

1.2.10 Transparency

We will be transparent about the nature and provenance of the content we offer online.  Where appropriate, we will identify who has created it and will use labelling to help online users make informed decisions about the suitability of content for themselves and their children.

1.2.11 Accountability

We are accountable to our audiences and will deal fairly and openly with them.  Their continuing trust in the BBC is a crucial part of our relationship with them.  We will be open in acknowledging mistakes when they are made and encourage a culture of willingness to learn from them.

OFCOM Rules

Rules relating to due impartiality and due accuracy in news

Rule 5.1

News, in whatever form, must be reported with due accuracy and presented with due impartiality.

Guidance

1.7 Accuracy entails getting the facts right. In complying with the requirement to report news with ‘due accuracy’, broadcasters should refer to the clarification of ‘due’ set out in the meaning of ‘due impartiality’, as laid out above. For example, where a matter is of particular public interest, the requirement to present that matter with due accuracy will be correspondingly higher.

1.8 In terms of this section of the Code (i.e. the requirement for ‘due impartiality’ and ‘due accuracy’), news in whatever form would include news bulletins, news flashes and daily news magazine programmes. Just because material is broadcast on a ‘rolling news’ channel does not necessarily mean that the material would be characterised as ‘news’ content.

1.9 In accordance with a broadcaster’s right to freedom of expression, the broadcaster has the right to interpret news events as it sees fit, as long as it complies with the Code. However, broadcasters should take care before making any unequivocal interpretations or statements about contentious issues, which may be dependent on nuance and open to different interpretations e.g. statistical findings or ambiguous statements made by politicians.

1.10 Rule 5.1 is potentially applicable to any topic included in news programming, and not just matters of political or industrial controversy and matters relating to current public policy. There is no requirement on broadcasters to provide an alternative viewpoint in all news stories or all issues in the news. However, all news stories must be reported with due accuracy and presented with due impartiality i.e. impartiality adequate or appropriate to the subject.

1.11 Due impartiality in news might be achieved through broadcasting different viewpoints on a particular issue on successive days in a series of explicitly linked ‘special’ news reports which each separately focus on one particular viewpoint on a particular subject. Depending on the circumstances in each case, such an editorial approach might ensure compliance with Rule 5.1, as long as it was clearly signposted to the audience, in line with Rule 5.6 of the Code.

1.12 In reporting on particular news items, the broadcasters should take account of all relevant facts, including the nature of the coverage and whether there are varying viewpoints on a particular item. For example, if a news item includes criticism of individuals or organisations, then broadcasters should consider whether they need to reflect the viewpoints of the individuals or organisations being criticised, within their news output as appropriate and in a proportionate way and/or reflect any refusal to comment of that individual or organisation.

Guidance Notes

Issue Five: 21 March 2013

4 Whether news is presented with due impartiality will depend on all the relevant circumstances.

1.13 In its research, Ofcom has consistently found that audiences say that impartiality and accuracy in broadcast news is important to them. For example, Ofcom’s 2011 Media Tracker survey1 found that 94% of all respondents considered it important that television news is impartial, with the corresponding figure for radio news being 88%. Ofcom research has found that audiences consider it equally important that television and radio news is accurate.

1.14 Ofcom research has also demonstrated that there are greater expectations for news channels that are perceived to be aimed at a UK audience than there are for channels with a global audience.

1.15 Broadcasters can criticise or support the actions of particular nation-states in their programming, as long as they, as appropriate, reflect alternative views on such matters.

1.16 Broadcasters should take care to report surveys and statistics in context.

1.17 Where a broadcaster attempts to seek alternative views, but these are not readily available (for example, an individual or organisation declines to give an interview or give comments), there are a range of editorial techniques for maintaining due impartiality. For example, broadcasters could: seek alternative viewpoints from a range of sources; summarise with due objectivity and in context the alternative viewpoints, for example, through interviewees expressing alternative views; make clear with appropriate frequency and prominence that a broadcaster has sought alternative views from particular individuals or organisations; and/or ensure that the views expressed in a news item are challenged critically by presenters and reporters within the programmes. Broadcasters must not assume prior knowledge on the part of the audience of particular alternative views. However, overall, it is an editorial matter for the broadcaster as to how it presents news with due impartiality.

1.18 When reporting the news, presenters and reporters employed by a broadcaster must take care that they present the news with due impartiality and maintain the editorial independence of the channel they represent.

1.19 Ofcom’s previous decisions on these issues include:

ITV News, ITV 1:
http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/enforcement/broadcast-bulletins/obb79/issue79.pdf

News, Radio Ikhlas:
http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/enforcement/broadcast-bulletins/obb1941/obb195.pdf .

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                            "Maddie's Jammies. Where is Maddie?" - Amelie, May 2007 -  "Maddie's Jammies. Where is Maddie?"


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Re: BBC Charter - OFCOM Rules - The Crimewatch broadcast 14 October 2013 - Truth, accuracy, fairness and impartiality in broadcasting

Post by Tony Bennett on 08.10.13 10:45

From BBC Crimewatch's Home Page today:

Help us solve some of the UK's biggest cases. Join the team for dramatic reconstructions, CCTV footage and our wanted faces. Your call could be all it takes to put an offender behind bars.

Twitter: #Crimewatch to reveal significant new info from @metpoliceuk investigation into Madeleine McCann disappearance. Mon Oct 14th 9pm @BBCOne
14/10/2013

DURATION: 1 HOUR

In a world exclusive, Scotland Yard detectives reveal their latest findings in the search for Madeleine McCann. The then three-year-old was abducted from her family's holiday apartment in Praia da Luz, Portugal in May 2007.

Crimewatch, for the first time, reconstructs what the new British investigation tells us about that night, and Kirsty Young speaks to Kate and Gerry McCann about their renewed hopes of finding their daughter.

With unprecedented access to the Metropolitan Police investigation, Crimewatch hears from the lead officers who believe the crucial new leads could help finally uncover the truth of who took Madeleine.

[ Also featuring crimes caught on camera in Martin Bayfield's CCTV round-up and a new collection of wanted faces. Plus, all the latest news on arrests and convictions on previous cases resulting from your calls. ]

____________________

                            "Maddie's Jammies. Where is Maddie?" - Amelie, May 2007 -  "Maddie's Jammies. Where is Maddie?"


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Re: BBC Charter - OFCOM Rules - The Crimewatch broadcast 14 October 2013 - Truth, accuracy, fairness and impartiality in broadcasting

Post by pennylane on 08.10.13 10:51

Thanks Tony,

So there you have it folks. Please get writing everyone! hello 

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Re: BBC Charter - OFCOM Rules - The Crimewatch broadcast 14 October 2013 - Truth, accuracy, fairness and impartiality in broadcasting

Post by aquila on 08.10.13 10:51

A WORLD exclusive?

Has Portugal dropped off the planet this morning?

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Re: BBC Charter - OFCOM Rules - The Crimewatch broadcast 14 October 2013 - Truth, accuracy, fairness and impartiality in broadcasting

Post by jeanmonroe on 08.10.13 10:52

OFCOM 2.2
2.2 Factual programmes or items or PORTRAYALS of FACTUAL matters MUST NOT materially MISLEAD the AUDIENCE. (Note to Rule 2.2: News is regulated under Section Five of the Code.)

https://ssl.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006ppmq/contact

As TB has said get writing!

Then the BBC will NEVER be able to CLAIM they 'didn't know' they were going to 'mislead the audience' BEFORE their programme was broadcast.

They DID know because i and others told them!

If they say Madeleine was 'abducted' that is seriously 'misleading' UNLESS of course they have the PROOF to be able to prove that.
Just saying one of the former arguido/arguida 'friends' MIGHT have seen something is NOT proof!

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Re: BBC Charter - OFCOM Rules - The Crimewatch broadcast 14 October 2013 - Truth, accuracy, fairness and impartiality in broadcasting

Post by MRNOODLES on 08.10.13 11:55

Message sent spin in a straight to the point non abusive friendly manner. Pointing out their 'error'.

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