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ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

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agree

Post by marconi on 16.08.13 0:59

@davel wrote:Why would the govt spend millions on a whitewash, doesn't make sense
 especially because the parents were not seen and still aren't seen as suspects, in the UK.
the government want to get rid of the McCanns.
Besides, Rebekah Brooks blackmaild Cameron, on orde to put the Scotland Yard in the case.
Goal: selling more papers.

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wait

Post by marconi on 16.08.13 1:36

we have to be patient and to wait.
In six years, it is the first time that we get such a lot of information. If we would have depended on the PJ, we would have been in complete darkness till now, because of the Portuguese laws.
At least the Met police are talking, Redwood gave a good interview.
Imo, the pre-final step is about to happen: Algarve, and the answer will come from there. Somebody will tell what happened to the body.
 
Every police know how to interrogate.
 
Besides I still believe that at least one of the Tapas has told the truth and that will be enough to put the pressure on the rest.
 
The silence of the McCanns, the lack of new sightings, the disappearance of Kate say more than any interview does.
 
We dont know what is going on behind the scenes.
 
We have to wait.

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by Tony Bennett on 16.08.13 5:44

Back on topic, here is an assessment of Alison Saunders' career - made only last week - in the Law Gazette. The first part about the 'bullying culture' in the CPS is another concern about Saunders. Moreoever, lower down in the article we learn that the civil service department with the lowest morale of any of them is: the CPS.

Towards the end of this article is a very enthusiastic quote about Saunders from one Stephen Parkinson of Kingsley Napley. It was of course lawyers and barristers from Kingsley Napley who co-ordinated the array of legal help that the McCanns were able to call on during the days in September 2007 immediately following their return from Portugal.

As the book: 'madeleine' by Dr Kate McCann (p. 268) informs us:

"On Wednesday 12 September, Gerry was contacted by Edward Smethurst, a commercial lawyer. He represented a businessman called Brian Kennedy...A meeting with Edward and Brian was arranged for that Friday at the Kingsley Napley offices in Lndon. On Friday morning, Angus McBride [from Kingsley Napley] kindly drove to Rothley to pick us up and take us down to London..."

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Profile: Alison Saunders

Monday 05 August 2013 by Jonathan Rayner

Biog

BORN Aberdeen

UNIVERSITY graduated in law from Leeds University in 1982

JOBS called to the bar in 1983; pupil at 1 Garden Court; legal adviser at Lloyd’s of London; joined the CPS in 1986; will become DPP on 1 November

++++++++++++

Alison Saunders, the next director of public prosecutions (DPP), inherits a Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) whose lawyers have scant faith in its management and who feel that their work is under-valued, according to the latest Civil Service People Survey that was published in February.

Face to face, some CPS prosecutors are equally blunt. One senior member of the London team, who asked not to be named, told the Gazette that the management culture was centred on ‘fear, blame and bullying’. She said that as London’s chief crown prosecutor, Saunders must bear much of the responsibility for the development of such a culture: ‘If she can’t sort out London, why put her in charge of the entire CPS?’ It is not just members of staff who are unhappy. The CPS, still reeling from 27.5% budget cuts and a 7.5% reduction in lawyer numbers, stands accused by defence lawyers and the police of incompetence and delays in dealing with cases. All of which suggests that Saunders will face an uphill struggle to solve the ills of what is apparently a dysfunctional organisation.

So what, objectively, do we know about Saunders? She is a career prosecutor who joined the CPS upon its formation in 1986 and is the first internal candidate – and only the second woman since Dame Barbara Mills in the 1990s – to be appointed to the top job. She spent the early years of her career with the CPS prosecuting in south London before moving on to work on policy around child victims and witnesses. In 2001, she became chief crown prosecutor for Sussex and, among many hundreds of other cases, oversaw the prosecution of Roy Whiting for the abduction and murder of eight-year-old Sarah Payne. After a brief spell as deputy legal adviser to the attorney general, she returned to the CPS to set up its organised crime division, which deals with cross-border and domestic cases of human trafficking, drugs, counterfeiting, money laundering and other serious offences.

In 2009, she became chief crown prosecutor for London, where more than a quarter of all crimes nationally are committed. Since then, she has overseen the successful prosecution and jailing of two of the men who killed black teenager Stephen Lawrence in 1993. More controversially, she also oversaw the prosecution of thousands of people involved in the August 2011 riots in London, when heavy sentences were handed down for sometimes trivial offences.

The present incumbent, Keir Starmer, who is standing down at the end of October on the completion of his five-year term, is a hard act to follow. He has won praise for improving the CPS’s success rate in prosecuting rape and domestic violence cases, and has been an unswerving defender of the Human Rights Act. He is also credited with making the criminal justice system more focused on the needs of victims. Starmer was described by attorney general Dominic Grieve as ‘not just a formidable lawyer’, but one who ‘brought sound instinct and humanity to his role’. Grieve added that Starmer ‘can be proud of the reforms that he and his staff have led to keep our criminal justice system one of the best in the world’.

A hard act to follow, but the great and the good, including Grieve, were quick to rally behind Saunders when her appointment was announced. Grieve said: ‘Alison will make an excellent DPP and is the right person to help the CPS meet the challenges it will face in the coming years. I am particularly pleased that Alison is the first head of the CPS to be appointed from within its ranks as proof of the high quality of the professionals that work within the service.’

Criminal defence solicitors have been largely supportive, too. Anthony Edwards, senior partner at London firm TV Edwards, told the Gazette: ‘She has been a very safe pair of hands in dealing with major casework in London, particularly during the riots of 2011 [for which work she was made a Companion of the Order of Bath].

‘She has enormous experience and has demonstrated sound judgment. She also has casework and policy experience and understands the current issues facing the CPS. Prime among these is the effects of government budget cuts. In London this has meant serious failings in the handling of volume casework, with essential disclosure being a particular problem.’ Edwards adds that when she takes up her new role on 1 November, Saunders will be able to make government aware, ‘from first-hand experience’, of the problems that exist and identify ways forward – which is ‘almost inevitably reducing the volume of low-level divisional crime passing through the courts’.

Another criminal lawyer, solicitor-advocate Malcolm Fowler of West Midlands firm Dennings, says Saunders ‘breaks the mould’ in that she is not a human rights barrister direct from chambers: ‘But neither is she the “grizzled” prosecutor that some Tory MPs wanted as DPP to lock up criminals with little regard for their human rights. If some political elements think she will deliver human rights minus, they are going to be disappointed.’

A third criminal law practitioner, Stephen Parkinson, head of criminal law at London firm Kingsley Napley, says Saunders’ appointment was ‘tremendous news’. He adds: ‘She is a first-class lawyer with great experience and a thorough understanding of the way the CPS works. This appointment is not only good for Alison, but good for the CPS, too. It demonstrates you can join the CPS as a newly qualified solicitor and eventually become DPP. I wish her every success.’

But before we get carried away with unqualified praise of Saunders, there are still some dissenting voices. A second senior CPS prosecutor, who also requested anonymity, told the Gazette he has mixed views on Saunders’ appointment. ‘On the one hand, the attorney general has appointed an in-house career prosecutor rather than leading counsel from within the chambers system and the independent bar, which is a welcome break with the past. On the other hand, management is a big issue within the CPS and Alison is not popular among rank and file prosecutors.

She is seen as careerist and uninspiring. Her appeal for the “Dunkirk spirit” in the face of cutbacks was thought of as an inappropriate analogy.’ He adds that the CPS is a sizeable organisation with some 7,000 lawyers, so Saunders’ management experience is ‘a plus’. However, like Starmer and all the other DPPs, she is a barrister and, although the single largest employer of solicitors, the CPS has still to see a solicitor DPP, he notes.

‘I suspect that the attorney general was impressed by how CPS London stepped up to the plate during the 2011 London riots, for which Alison as chief crown prosecutor can claim much of the credit,’ he says. ‘Nonetheless, CPS London is seen as under-performing, and morale among solicitor prosecutors is low and made worse by budget cuts.’

The two senior CPS prosecutors who spoke to the Gazette are not isolated cases of malcontents, if the findings of the Civil Service People Survey are to be believed. This is an annual survey, carried out by the Cabinet Office, of all civil service departments. It puts around 100 questions to civil servants and collates the results to provide a ‘benchmark’ that is the average score across all departments. It also provides scores for individual departments that can be compared against the benchmark.

The Gazette downloaded the survey from the Cabinet Office website and used it to measure the CPS against the general benchmark, and against the scores registered by the Ministry of Justice. The CPS consistently recorded the lowest scores. On whether management motivates staff to be more effective in their jobs, the benchmark was 66%, the MoJ was 69% and the CPS just 54%. On confidence in management, the benchmark was 71%, the MoJ was 75% and the CPS only 59%.

This pattern was repeated across learning and development opportunities, inclusion and fair treatment, leadership and managing change, and employee engagement. In fact, it was repeated across all areas apart from discrimination and bullying and harassment, for both of which categories of question the CPS recorded higher figures – 14% and 12% respectively – than either the benchmark or the MoJ, which showed just 10%. This, of course, is not a distinction of which to be proud. It certainly seems that Saunders has a hill to climb if she is to turn the CPS around and make its service unite behind its mission to prosecute crime effectively. What are her most urgent in-tray challenges? Commentators are agreed that first and foremost she needs to get her staff onside and motivated to deliver improvements in back-office efficiency and the prosecution of volume crime, as opposed to high-profile, more serious crimes.

They call on her to bring the same high standards that the CPS achieves on these latter crimes to the great mass of smaller crimes that are heard in the Crown and magistrates’ courts. She also needs to rebuild morale after allegations of incompetence and inexperience have been directed at in-house CPS advocates who were introduced to save money spent on external counsel. The latter need more training and encouragement to continue taking cases to the Crown court, which will have the knock-on effect of helping recruitment and raising the status of CPS prosecutors. And finally, she will need the managerial strength to run a service that is under constant scrutiny and that must continually meet higher standards with less money.

Certainly, Saunders herself is bullish about her new role. When her appointment was made public, she was widely reported as saying: ‘I am delighted and privileged to be appointed as the next DPP. To lead an organisation of committed and professional staff is an honour.’


Jonathan Rayner is a reporter on the Gazette

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by plebgate on 16.08.13 6:20

Mixed reviews then Tony. As a general rule I would listen to the worker bees as opposed to the more senior bees who by and large have absolutely no idea what goes on day to day in a Department.

Re. the Hillsborough issue. Let us hope she has learned from past mistakes as one poster has said, but what a heck of a mistake to make, involving so many innocent people and their families. Sheesh.

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by davel on 16.08.13 6:23

Tony,
when are you going to realise you are just plain wrong.
You were totally wrong on the Holly Greig case and SY have all but proved you are wrong on the McCann case. They will eventually.
You have made an absolute idiot of yourself.

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by plebgate on 16.08.13 6:27

How has Tony made a fool of himself Kevin (sorry) Davel?

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by Tony Bennett on 16.08.13 6:43

It was Alison Saunders in her role as Head of London CPS, working closely with the Met Police, who stopped the trial of three men accused of murdering Daniel Morgan in 1987, in one of the longest-running police corruption cases ever.

One of the accused, Jonathan Rees, was very closely connected to Andy Coulson, former editor of the News of the World, and now facing charges of (I think) 'phone hacking and maybe perverting the couyrse of justice as well.

Andy Coulson was of course David Cameron's ill-fated choice as his Director of Communications 2009-2011, and for three months in 2010, in the run-up to the General Election of 2010, Clarence Mitchell was his Deputy.

Rebekah Wade/Brooks was of course Andy Coulson's boss as Rupert Murdoch's CEO of News Intetnational. She also faces similar charges to Coulson and is accused of perverting the course of justice by deleting e-mails to prevent the police from knowing what went on. IIRC she told her PA to throw some hard drives into her dustbin. It was Rebekah Brooks who ordered our Prime Minister to set up Operation Grange, on the very day that the Sun began serialising the book: 'madeleine' by Dr Kate McCann, which was published the very same day.

Daniel Morgan's brother Alastair has a website about the network of high-level police corruption that has covered up his brother's death. See also:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Morgan_(private_investigator)
https://twitter.com/AlastairMorgan
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Justice-for-Daniel-Morgan/237396839629908

Here is the CPS statement explaining why they were abandoning the prosecution of the alleged killers of Daniel Morgan:

+++++++++++++++

11/03/2011


CPS stops prosecution for 1987 killing of Daniel Morgan

We have decided that the prosecution of three men for the killing of private detective Daniel Morgan in 1987 cannot continue. Alison Saunders, Chief Crown Prosecutor for CPS London, said:

“Daniel Morgan was brutally killed 24 years ago. When we authorised charges against five men in April 2008 in relation to his death, we knew this would be a challenging prosecution because of both the passage of time and the amount of material, more than 750,000 pages, which needed to be considered for disclosure to the defence. Material that could assist the defence or undermine the prosecution must be disclosed.

“We were, until yesterday, satisfied that there was sufficient evidence for a realistic prospect of conviction. However, we must continuously review prosecutions to ensure that it is both fair and appropriate that they continue. We no longer believe this prosecution should continue.

“In December 2009, the police revealed a large amount of material to us that had not been considered for disclosure before. There was then considerable legal argument on whether it was possible for the case to proceed. Officers assured the court that there was no further unconsidered material. The judge was considering this matter when, on Friday 4 March 2011, the police revealed further material that had not been previously considered.

“We have decided that a prosecution cannot continue in these circumstances. We cannot be confident that the defence necessarily have all of the material that they are entitled to. This point would be raised by the defence during any trial, so we are no longer satisfied that there is sufficient evidence for a realistic prospect of conviction.

“This decision has been taken by the CPS with the advice of senior counsel. Daniel Morgan’s family was also consulted before this decision was taken. This has been a long and difficult ordeal for the family, and we have offered them our heartfelt sympathies.”

Background

• The CPS authorised charges against five men in April 2008 – a joint charge of murder against William (Jonathan) Rees, Glen Vian, Gary Vian and James Cook and a charge of perverting the course of justice against Sidney Fillery. However, the cases against Cook and Fillery had already been discontinued at an earlier stage in the proceedings.

• Three prosecution witnesses were subject to agreements under the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act (SOCPA) 2005.

• The case against Sidney Fillery relied entirely upon the evidence of a SOCPA witness that was ruled inadmissible by the court in February 2010. We then offered no evidence against him for perverting the course of justice.

• The case against James Cook relied upon the evidence of three witnesses, including the evidence of the SOCPA witness that the court had ruled inadmissible. We carefully considered whether it was possible to continue with the evidence of the other two witnesses, including another SOCPA witness, but decided it was not possible in November 2010.

• It emerged in December 2010 that material that could have assisted the defence concerning the prosecution’s remaining SOCPA witnesses and should have been disclosed by the police had been lost. Although we could no longer use this witness’s evidence against the remaining three defendants, we were satisfied the prosecution could continue.



"We are all in this together" - Brooks to Cameron

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by davel on 16.08.13 6:43

@plebgate wrote:How has Tony made a fool of himself Kevin (sorry) Davel?
 Holly Greig

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by plebgate on 16.08.13 6:51

in your opinion Davel.

How is Tony so completely wrong - are you not bothering to read his posts?

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by Guest on 17.08.13 20:49

DaveL, he certainly isn't the only one who doesn't believe the official Hollie (please note the spelling) Greig and McCanns stories.

Are you able to explain briefly why, despite all the glaring discrepancies in both of them, you do believe them?

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by davel on 18.08.13 19:08

No Fate Worse Than De'Ath wrote:DaveL, he certainly isn't the only one who doesn't believe the official Hollie (please note the spelling) Greig and McCanns stories.

Are you able to explain briefly why, despite all the glaring discrepancies in both of them, you do believe them?
it has been shown that the Hollie Greig case was founded on a load of lies told by her mother . I seem to remember that the story was featured on the madeleine Foundation website but all posts have now been removed

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by Guest on 18.08.13 21:20

There certainly is no doubt in my mind that the Hollie Greig story cannot be corroborated though as you will know from the separate topic there are still many people who believe it.

I remain unclear why you condemned Tony in particular for his comments both on that case and that of the McCanns when virtually everyone here has similar thoughts. If he is a fool, I shall gladly don my fool's cap too!

daft1 

Yes I think that the Greig case was on the Madeleine Foundation website some years ago but that was before all the doubts became more widely known. Tony is no longer involved in the running of that site, of course.

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priest

Post by marconi on 18.08.13 23:27

This whole saga is making me impatient. Everything is taking so long.  Sometime ago  we, believers members of our church, received a letter announcing the arrival of a new priest.
I don't often go  to church but, believing that I needed some meditation in order to calm down, I decided  to go to his Mass, yesterday.I was hoping for a good sermon.
His sermon was taking so long, that it made me think of Tony Bennet's posts and I left the church.
I'm sure the Pope will forgive me.

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by Who?What?Where? on 19.08.13 0:45

Mr Bennett in his original post, copied......"following my pupilage in a common law set"

What on Earth does that mean? I cannot remember ever having read that phrase before.

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by sallypelt on 19.08.13 1:04

@Who?What?Where? wrote:Mr Bennett in his original post, copied......"following my pupilage in a common law set"

What on Earth does that mean? I cannot remember ever having read that phrase before.
I believe it means to shadow a barrister within a barrister's chamber, but I'm sure someone will correct me if I am wrong

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by Who?What?Where? on 19.08.13 1:15

Thank's sallypelt,
So, we have a law that applies to the common people, or pleb's, as some refer to us, and another law that applie's to the, supposed, elite?

That would definitely fit in, with what I am seeing here. The Mccann's seem to have been subjected to a different set of rule's, compared to the majority.

Do as I say, not as I do, seem's to be the constant  mantra, of people who believe that they have some sort of power.

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by Tony Bennett on 19.08.13 7:08

@marconi wrote:This whole saga is making me impatient. Everything is taking so long. Sometime ago we, believer members of our church, received a letter announcing the arrival of a new priest. I don't often go  to church but, believing that I needed some meditation in order to calm down, I decided  to go to his Mass, yesterday. I was hoping for a good sermon. His sermon was taking so long, that it made me think of Tony Bennet's posts and I left the church...
At least I am in good company.

After receiving sustained opposition in Macedonia on one of his missionary journeys, St. Paul stopped over at Troas, on the north-western coast of modern-day Turkey, where the sheer length of his sermon caused a young man, Eutychus, to be literally bored to death. However, all is well that ends well, and Paul raised him back to life, one of eight resurrections recorded in the Bible:

Acts 20 vv 7-12:

And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight.
And there were many lights in the upper chamber, where they were gathered together.
And there sat in a window a certain young man named Eutychus, being fallen into a deep sleep: and as Paul was long preaching, he sunk down with sleep, and fell down from the third loft, and was taken up dead.
And Paul went down, and fell on him, and embracing him said, Trouble not yourselves; for his life is in him.
When he therefore was come up again, and had broken bread, and eaten, and talked a long while, even till break of day, so he departed.
And they brought the young man alive, and were not a little comforted.


By the way, if you went to a Mass, you were in the wrong church. As the great Protestant reformers said, the Mass is 'a blasphemous fable and a dangerous deceit'.

The Pope and his men claim that they have the magic power to transform the communion wafer into the actual body of Christ. A hoax, in other words.The Protestant reformers did as the believers at Troas did 2,000 years ago; they simply broke bread as an act of remembrance for their Saviour.

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sint paul

Post by marconi on 19.08.13 8:12

@Tony Bennett wrote:
@marconi wrote:This whole saga is making me impatient. Everything is taking so long. Sometime ago we, believer members of our church, received a letter announcing the arrival of a new priest. I don't often go  to church but, believing that I needed some meditation in order to calm down, I decided  to go to his Mass, yesterday. I was hoping for a good sermon. His sermon was taking so long, that it made me think of Tony Bennet's posts and I left the church.

(Acts 20 vv 7-12:

(And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight.
And there were many lights in the upper chamber, where they were gathered together.)
It is obvious that Sint Paul was a Fidel Castro's ancestral. I must say I learn every day.

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by davel on 19.08.13 22:38

@Tony Bennett wrote:
@marconi wrote:This whole saga is making me impatient. Everything is taking so long. Sometime ago we, believer members of our church, received a letter announcing the arrival of a new priest. I don't often go  to church but, believing that I needed some meditation in order to calm down, I decided  to go to his Mass, yesterday. I was hoping for a good sermon. His sermon was taking so long, that it made me think of Tony Bennet's posts and I left the church...
At least I am in good company.

After receiving sustained opposition in Macedonia on one of his missionary journeys, St. Paul stopped over at Troas, on the north-western coast of modern-day Turkey, where the sheer length of his sermon caused a young man, Eutychus, to be literally bored to death. However, all is well that ends well, and Paul raised him back to life, one of eight resurrections recorded in the Bible:

Acts 20 vv 7-12:

And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight.
And there were many lights in the upper chamber, where they were gathered together.
And there sat in a window a certain young man named Eutychus, being fallen into a deep sleep: and as Paul was long preaching, he sunk down with sleep, and fell down from the third loft, and was taken up dead.
And Paul went down, and fell on him, and embracing him said, Trouble not yourselves; for his life is in him.
When he therefore was come up again, and had broken bread, and eaten, and talked a long while, even till break of day, so he departed.
And they brought the young man alive, and were not a little comforted.


By the way, if you went to a Mass, you were in the wrong church. As the great Protestant reformers said, the Mass is 'a blasphemous fable and a dangerous deceit'.

The Pope and his men claim that they have the magic power to transform the communion wafer into the actual body of Christ. A hoax, in other words.The Protestant reformers did as the believers at Troas did 2,000 years ago; they simply broke bread as an act of remembrance for their Saviour.

Tony...isn't the story that the earth is only 6000 years old a similar hoax

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by Guest on 19.08.13 22:42

That's what creationists believe, isn't it? I wouldn't describe it as a hoax, just something that doesn't stand up to scientific evidence.

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by Guest on 19.08.13 22:51

Reportedly a Bishop's wife at the time in the 1880s when Charles Darwin was claiming that human beings were descended from monkeys, said to her husband: ‘My dear, let us hope it is not true; but, if it is true, let us hope it will not become generally known.’

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by whmon on 19.08.13 22:58

It was once thought that what separated humans from other apes was tool use. Then it was discovered that this is not true - what actually separates humans from other apes is consonants, as the other apes can only pronounce the vowels clapping lol!

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by Tony Bennett on 19.08.13 23:02

@davel wrote:Tony...isn't the story that the earth is only 6000 years old a similar hoax
marconi has driven this thread off topic with his.her meanderings about being bored in church.

The thread is about Alison Saunders - our next Director of Public Prosecutions, and one of two top CPS lawyers who recently went at taxpayers' expense to Portugal. The expert opinion on this forum was that she and her colleague could only legally have made that trip to Portugal if they had in mind possible charges in the Madeleine McCann case against someone in the jurisdiction of Englnd and Wales. I have raised the question of whether there is anything in her record which suggests that she would be unsuitable for the job.

No Fate Worse Than De'Ath wrote:That's what creationists believe, isn't it? I wouldn't describe it as a hoax, just something that doesn't stand up to scientific evidence.
I am quite happy to debate the age of the earth, but if someone wants to debate that, could they please start a thread in the Members Lounge.

davel wrote: "Isn't the story that the earth is only 6000 years old a similar hoax"

ANSWER: NO. Very much the reverse. A good starting point is Malcolm Bowden's "The Rise of the Evolution Fraud", Sovereign Publications,ISBN 0 9506042 2 4.

The theory of evolution is arguably the biggest hoax ever perpetrated on mankind (though the Roman Catholic Church might come a close second). But evolution theory is believed by great numbers of people. The scientific evidence is wholly in favour of special creation, not evolution. Similarly, the known scientific facts speak of a very young earth, yes, around 6,000 years old; there was no 'Big Bang' 13 to 15 billion years ago. No scientific fact contradicts a young earth. Down to the Members Lounge please if you want to debate that.


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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by Guest on 19.08.13 23:06

@ whmom
You should hear my youngest dog calling me with what he thinks is calling my name. And he almost got it right Mrs 

Spaß beiseite: I agree with Tony. Let's get back OT.

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Re: ALISON SAUNDERS - Senior CPS lawyer who went to Portugal in April - and will become the next Director of Public Prosecutions. Her track record examined.

Post by comperedna on 20.08.13 12:48

Tony. I agree this thread has gone off topic. Yes. Let's get back to Ms Saunders about whom I know very little except what I have read online. She will be a king-pin (queen-pin?) in any prosecution if there is one. I will not respond about evolution, except to express my surprise that you wrote what you wrote (!) Move on!

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