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Amanda Knox's book - BBC actually read it !

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Amanda Knox's book - BBC actually read it !

Post by PeterMac on 02.05.13 14:14

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22351375
This is fascinating. Someone has read the book and compared it against her diaries and utterances from previous times. And has found they do not match.
A primetime television interview and a new book have put Amanda Knox's experience of prison life in Italy back under the spotlight. But do these accounts tally with what she said at the time?

In the weeks leading up to publication of Amanda Knox's memoir, Waiting to be Heard, descriptions of her four years in a Perugia women's prison as a "trauma in an Italian hellhole of sex and debauchery" - as the National Enquirer put it - have become increasingly lurid.
Knox's memoir is a vivid personal account of the difficulties of prison life in Italy, complete with claims about inappropriate behaviour by staff. But Knox herself once painted a different picture.
Other documents - including writings Knox penned in her own hand while incarcerated, case files and state department records - conjure up quite another impression of a very different Knox, one who was more sanguine about her experience.
"The prison staff are really nice," wrote Knox in her personal prison diary, which was eventually published in Italy under the title Amanda and the Others.
"They check in to make sure I'm okay very often and are very gentle with me. I don't like the police as much, though they were nice to me in the end, but only because I had named someone for them, when I was very scared and confused."
She described Italian prisons as "pretty swell", with a library, a television in her room, a bathroom and a reading lamp. No-one had beaten her up, she wrote, and one guard gave her a pep talk when she was crying in her cell.
Unlike the heavily-edited memoir, these are phrases she handwrote herself, complete with strike-outs, flowery doodles, peace signs and Beatles lyrics.
and again
She writes that she had a flashback to the interrogation, when she felt coerced into a false accusation. "I was weak and terrified that the police would carry out their threats to put me in prison for 30 years, so I broke down and spoke the words they convinced me to say. I said: 'Patrick - it was Patrick.'"

In her memoir, she describes in detail the morning that she put that accusation in writing, and says the prison guard told her to write it down fast. Yet in a letter to her lawyers she gives no hint of being rushed or pressured. "I tried writing what I could remember for the police, because I've always been better at thinking when I was writing. They gave me time to do this. In this message I wrote about my doubts, my questions and what I knew to be true."

And again
There is a similar contradiction a few paragraphs later, when she describes in harrowing terms the trauma of an examination at the police station.
"After my arrest, I was taken downstairs to a room where, in front of a male doctor, female nurse, and a few female police officers, I was told to strip naked and spread my legs. I was embarrassed because of my nudity, my period - I felt frustrated and helpless."
The doctor inspected, measured and photographed her private parts, she writes - "the most dehumanising, degrading experience I had ever been through"
But in the 9 November letter to her lawyers, she described a far more routine experience.
"During this time I was checked out by medics. I had my picture taken as well as more copies of my fingerprints. They took my shoes and my phone. I wanted to go home but they told me to wait. And that eventually I was to be arrested. Then I was taken here, to the prison, in the last car of three that carried Patrick, then Raffaele, then me to prison."

How very strange.
And how very similar to other cases where people have made statements to the police, some several times, and then have miraculously altered the details when writing a best seller. I am sure you can all think of a recent example.
But more to the point, do we now think that perhaps, just perhaps, someone at the Beeb has done the same thing with another book , diary, and police statements ?
They have shown they can.

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Re: Amanda Knox's book - BBC actually read it !

Post by ShuBob on 02.05.13 14:17

That was quick off the mark by the BBC! I live in hope they'll do the same with another book which was first released 2 years ago.

PM, for all we know the Beeb has done the same with the bestseller but for reasons which escape me, they are currently not allowed to publish it.

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Re: Amanda Knox's book - BBC actually read it !

Post by aiyoyo on 02.05.13 14:25

Good grief, can't believe the BEEB was that quick in making the comparison, drawing their conclusion, and going public with their observation. Something they havent done with Mc-bewk.
What is happening here?

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Re: Amanda Knox's book - BBC actually read it !

Post by ShuBob on 02.05.13 14:28

@aiyoyo wrote:Good grief, can't believe the BEEB was that quick in making the comparison, drawing their conclusion, and going public with their observation. Something they havent done with Mc-bewk.
What is happening here?

Injunctions, super or otherwise perhaps?

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