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Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

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Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by aquila on 11.04.13 18:41

Please read this link. David Cameron's speech to the Alzheimer Society. DC made dementia and alzheimers his priority. He doesn't like the stigma. He sat on a daytime tv sofa to tell the UK if I'm not mistaken.

Margaret Thatcher suffered from dementia/alzheimers. She was cared for around the clock by paid carers in comfortable surroundings. Good for her. I wish every sufferer the same comforts.

The point I'm getting at is that I doubt we will hear from DC's lips that the Iron Lady fell foul of this disease. The stigma will continue - it will not be said in the press that Margaret Thatcher suffered and died from dementia whilst the ceremonials are going on.

Here's DC's speech

http://www.politicshome.com/uk/article/49809/david_camerons_dementia_speech_in_full.html

Please read it.


Here is also a link to the Alzheimer's Society comment on Margaret Thatcher's death.

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/news_article.php?newsID=1541

Please read it.

Do you think that Margaret Thatcher's disease will ever be discussed publicly? or is dementia just for those not in positions of power.

In the end Margaret Thatcher was left in care with not many visitors. Those people will be at her funeral.

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Guest on 11.04.13 20:28

I remember that it also wasn't widely known that Harold Wilson had Alzheimer's Disease until after his death.

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by PeterMac on 11.04.13 22:13

Nor that Roosevelt used a wheelchair. No photos were permitted, and on the famous Pearl Harbour speech occasion he clamped himself into callipers and walked into Congress, his legs bleeding from the effort.
No trace of human frailty is permitted in politicians.
No trace of humanity from the press.

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by tigger on 12.04.13 6:39

@PeterMac wrote:Nor that Roosevelt used a wheelchair. No photos were permitted, and on the famous Pearl Harbour speech occasion he clamped himself into callipers and walked into Congress, his legs bleeding from the effort.
No trace of human frailty is permitted in politicians.
No trace of humanity from the press.

That is very interesting. It harks back to the Bronze Age and probably earlier where a leader should not have any physical flaws. It also has a parallel in the Arthurian myths, where the country suffers because the king is ill.
Richard the Third,( who was a far better king than any of the Tudors - certainly Richmond and Henry VIII) might have had a longer reign without his crooked back.


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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Guest on 12.04.13 9:38

Attitudes towards the disabled have in most cases changed over the years. It was customary for them to be hidden away.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2059831/The-Queens-hidden-cousins-They-banished-asylum-1941-left-neglected-intriguing-documentary-reveals-all.html

The Royal Family set a good example as ever!

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by PeterMac on 12.04.13 11:15

And remember the Kennedys who lobotomised their daughter, JFK's sister, because her behaviour was deemed unacceptable.
Placid and easygoing as a child and teenager, the maturing Kennedy became increasingly assertive in her personality. She was reportedly subject to violent mood swings. Some observers have since attributed this behavior to her difficulties in keeping up with siblings who were expected to perform to high standards, as well as the hormonal surges associated with puberty. In any case, the family had difficulty dealing with the often-stormy Rosemary, who had begun to sneak out at night from the convent where she was educated and cared for.

read this and weep for a girl who was probably no more than high spirited.

"We went through the top of the head, I think she was awake. She had a mild tranquilizer. I made a surgical incision in the brain through the skull. It was near the front. It was on both sides. We just made a small incision, no more than an inch." The instrument Dr. Watts used looked like a butter knife. He swung it up and down to cut brain tissue. "We put an instrument inside," he said. As Dr. Watts cut, Dr. Freeman put questions to Rosemary. For example, he asked her to recite the Lord's Prayer or sing "God Bless America" or count backwards. ... "We made an estimate on how far to cut based on how she responded." ... When she began to become incoherent, they stopped.

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Guest on 12.04.13 17:32

She sounds like a fairly normal teenager to me - though I don't think the word (teenager) was in common usage back then; a dreadful story.

It must be a nightmare growing up with parents for whom nothing but absolute perfection in everything is good enough.

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Guest on 12.04.13 20:25

No Fate Worse Than De'Ath wrote: [...]

It must be a nightmare growing up with parents for whom nothing but absolute perfection in everything is good enough.
***
Of course, one sleeping around and being President is much more acceptable in terms of perfection.

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Guest on 14.04.13 10:00

Just read Camaron's speech, he can talk the talk lets see if he can walk the walk by openly dicussing Maggies Alzimer/Dementia, I doubt he will he wouldn't want to tarnish her image. he will sweep it under the carpet, thereby keeping the brain desease stigmatized, shame on him.

Dementia has no respect for any part of society just like cancer hasn't, the elite think it won't affect them but as we know it does, however they have the money to keep it locked away, why are they so ashamed to say that it's happening in their family.

I remember watching a documentary on the life of Norman Wisdom, towards the end it took you to his Care Home on the Isle of Wight, he was suffering from Vasculer Dementia, a member of staff played the piano and Norman sang " Don't laugh at me cause I'm a fool" word for word just like he use to. His family had given permission for it to be shown to highlight Alzimers and the effect it has on the family. Norman died 4 October 2010

"There but for the grace of God go I"

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Guest on 15.04.13 9:38


Carol Thatcher's "A Swim on Part in the Goldfish Bowl: A Memoir,"


Book recounts Margaret Thatcher's decline



Margaret Thatcher's daughter says she first realized that her mother was having memory problems when the former prime minister struggled to distinguish between the 1982 Falklands War and the conflict in Bosnia.

In an excerpt from her memoir, due to be published next month, Carol Thatcher charts her mother's decline - and describes the day in 2000 that she first understood her mother was being robbed of her memory.

"I couldn't believe it," Carol said in a selection published by The Mail on Sunday. "She was in her 75th year, but I had always thought of her as ageless, timeless and 100 percent cast-iron damage-proof."

Carol said her mother - who is now 82 - used to have a memory "like a Web site," but that dementia, combined with a series of mini-strokes, had opened "a new and frightening chapter in our lives."

"What was most galling was that there was nothing I could do: this cruel disease takes its own course," she said.

Carol said her mother's memories of the time she spent as Britain's leader from 1979 to 1990 remained among the sharpest. Even as she had struggled to recall an article she had just read, she could still engage in a lively discussion about former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.

Carol said losing her father, Denis Thatcher, in 2003, was particularly hard on her mother, who kept forgetting he was dead.


"I had to keep telling her the bad news over and over again," she said.

Carol Thatcher says the disease has finally begun to eat away at her mother's memories of her time at top of British politics, too, but that her driver said she still perked up whenever he passed 10 Downing St., the official London residence of the British Priminister.


At the time Carol Thatcher was denouced by member's of her mother's political party and some commentators for invading her mothers privacy and dimminishing her dignity.

Mr. Reagan chose to disclose his Alzheimer’s disease in a handwritten open letter in 1994, accompanied by an explanatory letter from his doctors. He, too, had experienced memory loss for a couple of years, and once he got the Alzheimer’s diagnosis, he and Nancy Reagan considered how much to say.

“In opening our hearts, we hope this might promote greater awareness of this condition,” his letter said. “Perhaps it will encourage a clearer understanding of the individuals and families affected by it.”

Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, to this day, carry a stigma that most other diseases — heart failure, for example — do not.

Why didn't Thatcher follow her great political friend's example by talking about her illness ? Dementia is part of her story, it is not something we can ignore. Cameron should bring it out into the open, and so should all those who knew her. Dementia isn't what she will be remembered for is it ?










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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Lance De Boils on 15.04.13 17:38

It is one of the cruelest of illnesses. So very sad and difficult to deal with.

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Guest on 16.04.13 11:36

@Lance De Boils wrote:It is one of the cruelest of illnesses. So very sad and difficult to deal with.

It certainly is cruel and heartbreaking, the families are grieving the loss of their loved one long before they die.

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Snifferdog on 16.04.13 18:55

@tigger wrote:
@PeterMac wrote:Nor that Roosevelt used a wheelchair. No photos were permitted, and on the famous Pearl Harbour speech occasion he clamped himself into callipers and walked into Congress, his legs bleeding from the effort.
No trace of human frailty is permitted in politicians.
No trace of humanity from the press.

That is very interesting. It harks back to the Bronze Age and probably earlier where a leader should not have any physical flaws. It also has a parallel in the Arthurian myths, where the country suffers because the king is ill.
Richard the Third,( who was a far better king than any of the Tudors - certainly Richmond and Henry VIII) might have had a longer reign without his crooked back.

King Henry the v111 had syphilis which is why he could not produce a son despite having different wives. Male infants are generally weaker than female infants who are more able to withstand a syphiliptic infection. Naturally his wives had to take the blame for only being able to produce females.

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Guest on 16.04.13 19:21

Isn't it sad to lose your head, literally, for not producing a male heir. Count your blessings today, I say ;-)

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Snifferdog on 16.04.13 19:30

Yes things have improved somewhat for females since those days. I cant imagine why she wanted to stay married to him yeeuch! and lose her head because of him. I am so glad this family line of evil wicked murderers is not mine!

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Guest on 16.04.13 19:35

Good old King Hal did have one son who lived to be 15 (Edward VI) and another one who was illegitimate.

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Re: Margaret Thatcher, dementia and David Cameron's campaign

Post by Guest on 16.04.13 19:43

And Glorious Gloriana, let's not forget!

An example of prudent, honourable and reliable statemanship, if ever there was one.

A bit like abdicating Queen Beatrix I of the Netherlands.

Reliability. That's the word.

And so are Honour & Dignity

Dr. Amaral

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