The Complete Mystery of Madeleine McCann™
Hi,

A very warm welcome to The Complete Mystery of Madeleine McCann™ forum.

Please log in, or register to view all the forums, then settle in and start chatting with us!

Enjoy your day,

Jill Havern
Forum owner

The end of an era

View previous topic View next topic Go down

The end of an era

Post by Guest on 20.11.12 21:30

UK's 'last typewriter' produced

A typewriter, which its makers say is the last to be built in the UK, has been produced at a north Wales factory.

Manufacturer Brother, which says it has made 5.9 million typewriters since its factory in Wrexham opened in 1985, has donated the last machine to London's Science Museum.

The museum said the piece represented the end of a technology which had been "important to so many lives".

Edward Bryan, a worker at the factory since 1989, made the last typewriter.

"If people ever ask me, I can always say now, as a strange question, that I've made the last typewriter in the UK," he told BBC Breakfast's Colin Paterson.

He said he had previously "tried and succeeded to make one with my eyes closed".

'Special place'

Brother said it had stopped making typewriters in the UK because demand had fallen sharply in this country. It said that it still had significant sales in the US but its factory in the Far East produces enough typewriters to serve this market.

The company will continue to use the factory to run a recycling scheme for printer cartridges as well as to make other office technology.

UK boss Phil Jones said the typewriter still held "a special place in the hearts" of members of the public.

"Because of this, and the typewriter's importance in the history of business communication, we felt that giving it a home at the Science Museum would be a fitting tribute," he said.

Typewriters were first mass produced by the Remington company in the 1870s
The Science Museum's assistant curator of technologies and engineering, Rachel Boon, said staff were excited to add the item "to our rich collection of typewriters" which numbers more than 200.

"This object represents the end of typewriter manufacture in the UK, a technology which has developed over the last 130 years and has been important to so many lives," she said.

"This model will enable us to tell the story of how technology has evolved in accordance with our communication needs."

The first known typewriter was invented in the US in 1830 by William Burt.

But typewriters did not become a commercial success until the 1870s when inventors Christopher Sholes - who also invented the Qwerty keyboard - and Carlos Glidden made a deal with the Remington company to mass produce their machines.

The typewriter is widely regarded as being instrumental in helping many women to enter paid work for the first time.

Typing classes became popular in the late 19th Century, and by 1901 there were 166,000 female clerks in Britain - up from 2,000 half a century before

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20391538





Anyone still use a typewriter. I learned touch typing on and old manual at college. There were two electric typewriters in the classroom amongs 30 manuals, we all fought over who would use the electric one. I always remember my little finger throbbing after using the manual one Those keys were bloody stiff

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by Guest on 20.11.12 21:44

Candyfloss, until not very long ago, I always kept one. Just in case electricity would fail ... Lost it in one of my international movements. I also always had [ still have] a sewing machine, which functions without same electricity, just in case ...

And you took me back to old memories, of having to have a "diploma" in typewriting to get a job. Of having to produce [in the short period I was working for a "boss", I went independent at 24] international shipments with invoices in 14-fold. No photocopy machines, so 14 very thin sheets of paper with 13 carbon sheets in between, and trying NOT to cut out the zero's and O's ... :-( One tiny little typing error taking minutes to correct, with small pieces of paper between the paper and carbon and using a stuff to get all 13 wrong ones out without leaving black traces ... OMG
And yes the "a" with your left little finger was the most difficult one to manage yes



Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by Guest on 20.11.12 21:52

Ah yes Châtelaine, the old carbon paper, I had forgotten about that, rubbing out all the errors on all those copies Ah good old days

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by littlepixie on 20.11.12 22:05

I loved the old typewriters. I took "exam" typing in school. Was something satisfying about the whack as the key hit the ribbon.

littlepixie

Posts : 1340
Reputation : 2
Join date : 2009-11-29

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by PeterMac on 20.11.12 22:52


____________________


PeterMac
Researcher

Posts : 10170
Reputation : 143
Join date : 2010-12-06

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by Woofer on 20.11.12 23:57


That creased me up - sent it to all my friends who transferred to computers in the 70s/80s.

Woofer

Posts : 3390
Reputation : 12
Join date : 2012-02-06

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by tigger on 21.11.12 6:25


I still miss the carriage return, the kindly colleague who would change the ribbon (I pretended I didn't know, who wants black fingers?) Tip-ex and the jolly little bell that told you the carriage had gone as far as it could.

When we first got computers at work, I'd already been working with them for years - a microsoft office was installed which had a diary on it.
It took at least two minutes to fill in a new entry, as opposed to a few seconds by hand - filling in forms took far longer than by typewriter or by hand too.

But nobody would see that, they loved to log in (1 to 2 minutes) the screen lighting up and a message saying 'Hello Fred, you have one appointment today'. Another minute or so and you would see your 10.15 at the dentist.....

Recently I said to a young nurse that I hardly ever use my mobile, certainly don't always have it with me. 'Ah, it's a generation thing' she said condescendingly. I pointed out that I was writing computer programmes and using complicated software before she was born and that imo mobiles have enslaved an entire generation.


____________________
Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'entrate.

tigger

Posts : 8112
Reputation : 24
Join date : 2011-07-20

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by T4two on 21.11.12 7:04

I remember vaguely that I used a 'Brother' in the '80s. It was a word processor with a tiny screen which one could use to spell check and make corrections - neither a typewriter nor a computer but a sort of in-between thing. I am frankly amazed that Brother have only just produced their last typewriter; I thought they went out yonks ago.

T4two

Posts : 166
Reputation : 3
Join date : 2012-01-22
Age : 68
Location : Germany

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by aquila on 21.11.12 7:28

Learning to type with the plastic caps to hide the letters, getting my finger frequently jammed between the A and Z, reciting 'Mary had a little lamb' to develop a typing rhythm does bring back memories. Those A and Z keys certainly caused a lot of ouches!

@tigger - I own a mobile phone and can't remember the last time I used it. They have their uses but I don't have the patience or the eyesight to use one as part of everyday life. If I hear it ring (that's a big if) I have to find it in my handbag (sometimes there's more chance of finding Lord Lucan in that bag) and by the time I've put my glasses on it's rung off. It's a generation thing for me. I just can't be bothered and I find I can live without being glued to one.

aquila

Posts : 7953
Reputation : 1174
Join date : 2011-09-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by Guest on 21.11.12 9:25

Does anyone remember typing the two phrases, during typing lessons, which use all the letters of the alphabet.........

'the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog'

and

'now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of the party'


Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by aquila on 21.11.12 9:28

candyfloss wrote:Does anyone remember typing the two phrases, during typing lessons, which use all the letters of the alphabet.........

'the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog'

and

'now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of the party'


Hi candyfloss

It was 'the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog's head' I am a mine of useless information.

aquila

Posts : 7953
Reputation : 1174
Join date : 2011-09-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by Guest on 21.11.12 9:33

@aquila wrote:
candyfloss wrote:Does anyone remember typing the two phrases, during typing lessons, which use all the letters of the alphabet.........

'the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog'

and

'now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of the party'


Hi candyfloss

It was 'the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog's head' I am a mine of useless information.

Hi aquila,

I don't remember that aquila, we had no punctuation in ours, just straightforward words for the early typing lessons as I quoted above, the wiki entry says the same............



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_quick_brown_fox_jumps_over_the_lazy_dog

"The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" is an English-languagepangram – a phrase that contains all of the letters of the English alphabet. It has been used to test typewriters and computer keyboards, and in other applications involving all of the letters in the English alphabet. Owing to its brevity and coherence, it has become widely known.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by Guest on 21.11.12 9:36

I bought a Brother word processor as recently as 2000 and it was a real godsend as, poor old soul, I could no longer write legibly.

As for mobile phones, I never thought I would get one as I am phone phobic - they are in my view to be used only for short calls on urgent matters that can't be dealt with any other way.

However, I finally got one about 5 years ago and, though I can safely say that I will never suffer from the glued-to-the-ear syndrome that so many people do, it has been invaluable in allowing me to check that my son is safe and not, as I would have imagined before, lying dead in a gutter somewhere!

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by PeterMac on 21.11.12 9:39

The Daisy wheel and the Golf ball typewriters must have been among the shortest lived inventions of the last century.
I know they linked them to word processors for a while until someone invented dot matrix and then ink jet printing, but still, how long did they last ?

____________________


PeterMac
Researcher

Posts : 10170
Reputation : 143
Join date : 2010-12-06

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by Guest on 21.11.12 9:40

****
ROFL!

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by Guest on 21.11.12 9:45

Châtelaine wrote:
****
ROFL!


Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by Guest on 21.11.12 9:57

One of the bigger improvements [for me] was the IBM typewriter with ball and correction ribbon. No dirty fingers changing ribbon, no crossing letterhands when going too fast, no typex, possibility to change fonts. Waw!

And then, late 70's, I bought my first computer. It was an IBM, second-hand costing "only" 5,000 Dutch guilders [± € 2,300, imagine how much with inflation that would have been now 30+ years later] with a HARD drive, whilst most others were still working with floppy discs. It had 5Mb and I seriously thought it was my first and last computer, which would serve me for the rest of my life ... big grin

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: The end of an era

Post by monkey mind on 21.11.12 12:05

Yes Candyfloss, battering away at the quick brown fox big grin

Because I couldn’t see the keys it was all rather confusing when learning to touch type, so I used the following mnemonic going down the rows and from left to right....

Quick As Zebra (left pinkie)

White Snowy Xmas (left ring)

Every Day Counts (left middle)

Rank Film Video (left index)

Time Goes By (left index)

Yams Help Nourishment (right index)

Uncle Jim’s Mad (right index)

I Key comma (right middle)

Oh Let’s stop (right ring)

Please (right pinkie)

monkey mind

Posts : 616
Reputation : 1
Join date : 2011-12-19

View user profile

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum