The Complete Mystery of Madeleine McCann™
Hi,

A very warm welcome to The Complete Mystery of Madeleine McCann™ forum.

Please log in, or register to view all the forums, then settle in and start chatting with us!

Enjoy your day,

Jill Havern
Forum owner

Chilcot Enquiry

Page 1 of 3 1, 2, 3  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Doug D on 18.08.15 8:41

I'm sure there must be a Chilcot Enquiry thread somewhere, but I can't find it this morning:


DOMINIC LAWSON: Sorry, Mr Blair, but this Iraq report farce won't save you from the verdict of history
 
By DOMINIC LAWSON FOR THE DAILY MAIL
 
PUBLISHED: 01:28, 17 August 2015 | UPDATED: 08:57, 17 August 2015
 
 
Few parents could fail to sympathise with the anger of those families of British soldiers killed in the Iraq war, who see no end in sight to the delays in publication of the report into the circumstances in which this country joined the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003.
 
This ‘UK Iraq Inquiry’ under Sir John Chilcot, a retired civil servant, was commissioned by Prime Minister Gordon Brown in June 2009, concluded its evidence-taking in February 2011, and was due to have published its findings by 2014 at the latest.
 
When that deadline passed, we were assured Chilcot’s conclusions would see the light of day before the 2015 General Election. Now we are told the report might not be produced before the end of 2016 - and Sir John is not prepared even to make that commitment.
 
During the six years in which this has dragged on, a number of the parents of the 179 British soldiers killed in that conflict have themselves died. One was Sally Keys, the mother of Lance Corporal Thomas Keys, killed at the age of 20 in what was described as a ‘mob ambush’.
 
Thomas’s father, Reg Keys, is one of 29 bereaved parents now threatening to take legal action against Sir John Chilcot, unless he promises to release his report by the end of this year. Interviewed in last Friday’s Mail, Mr Keys said his wife ‘had hoped answers into Tom’s death would provide a soothing balm. But she didn’t live to hear those answers’.
 
Delayed
The sad truth - hard though it would be to tell Mr Keys directly - is that this report was never intended to provide comfort to the bereaved, nor even to ‘name the guilty men’.
 
On the most cynical explanation, it conformed to what was described in the political satire Yes Minister as the purpose of Royal Commissions: ‘This problem is a bloody nuisance, but we hope that by the time a Royal Commission reports, four years from now, everyone will have forgotten about it.’
 
Following one or two phone calls, there is not much doubt in my mind that some of those involved in the decision to invade Iraq are deliberately holding things up, in the hope that the longer things are delayed, the less will be the impact of any adverse judgment against them in the report.
 
This is actually what a retired diplomat told me - and he worked with several of those involved in the events leading up to the invasion. But the Iraq war is not one of those events in which public interest will gradually wane.
 
The decision to commit troops to wars - leading not just to the loss of life but strategic consequences which might be incalculable - is quite different from other aspects of political decision-making. World War II, and more recently the Falklands War, continue to excite the most intense passions - and in those, unlike Iraq, we were not the invader.
 
Those whose reputations hang on the report’s conclusions are deluding themselves if they think mere passage of time will diminish its impact.
 
The mechanism causing the delay is so-called Maxwellisation. This ugly term is given to the procedure in which those responsible for a public inquiry are required to give anyone their report is intending to criticise advance sight of the conclusions. The subject of those criticisms is then entitled to present arguments designed to persuade the report’s authors to amend or even reverse them.
 
In the case of the Chilcot Inquiry, it seems at least 150 individuals have received notice of criticism of their conduct in the report. And, according to my ex-diplomat friend, the process has been made still more interminable by the way letters have gone backwards and forwards many times over, between those criticised (or their lawyers) and the report’s author. He argues — and I would agree — that Sir John must now tell them: enough is enough.
 
Similar behaviour is also causing unconscionable delay in the publication of the official report into the £21 billion collapse of Halifax Bank of Scotland, which required taxpayers to bail out the vast corporation in 2008.
 
No fewer than 1,425 representations have been sent back from 35 people who are thought to have been criticised in the draft report — such as HBOS’s former chairman Lord [Dennis] Stevenson.
 
A former private shareholder in the failed bank, Philip Meadowcroft, complained last week: ‘There seems to be little appetite in Whitehall to resolve the absurd consequences of Maxwellisation as they have been played out in both the Chilcot and HBOS inquiries.’
 
But there is something still more absurd in respect of the Chilcot Inquiry: we already know as much as we need to pass judgment on those involved in the decision to invade Iraq — not least because of an official inquiry which took place 11 years ago.
 
I am referring to the Review of Intelligence on Weapons of Mass Destruction, chaired by Lord (Robin) Butler, previously the country’s most senior civil servant. His committee also included one John Chilcot.
 
Dodgy
The Butler Review - as it became known - was damning, even though it did not blame any specific individuals. It pointed out that, although Tony Blair had told Parliament the government had ‘extensive, detailed and authoritative intelligence’ that Saddam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction, he had in fact been told of the limited and patchy nature of such intelligence.
 
It also concluded that the government’s statements had stretched what it could base on that intelligence ‘to the outer limits’. That is civil service-ese for ‘completely dodgy’, if not ‘making things up’. By the way, Lord Butler’s entire Inquiry, from start to finish, took five months - yes, months.
 
For a long time, too, we have known that the then government’s chief legal officer, Lord Goldsmith, had told Blair that any invasion without a fresh United Nations resolution would be illegal, but then was invited to go away and come up with a revised legal opinion - which duly declared that invasion would be legal.
 
In other words, it has long been known that 179 British soldiers - and vastly more Iraqis - were killed as a result of a war of choice based on a false prospectus.
 
Whatever Chilcot’s interminably deferred conclusions, nothing can bring those lives back. And no amount of delaying tactics can reduce the culpability of those responsible.
 
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-3200425/Sorry-Mr-Blair-Iraq-report-farce-won-t-save-verdict-history.html

Doug D

Posts : 2147
Reputation : 639
Join date : 2013-12-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Doug D on 18.08.15 8:42

Peer heaps pressure on Chilcot over delay
 
Laura Pitel Political Correspondent
Last updated at 12:01AM, August 18 2015
 
A retired High Court judge has questioned the “inordinate” delay to the Chilcot inquiry into the Iraq war.
Baroness Butler-Sloss, a former head of the family division of the High Court, joined a chorus of criticism over the six-year wait for the report on the 2003 British invasion of Iraq.
In a letter to The Times, the crossbench peer has asked why the process of consulting senior figures censured in the report was taking so long.
 
‘When I chaired the Cleveland child abuse inquiry in 1987, my report was critical of a number of witnesses. I sent each a copy of the relevant chapter and asked for comments. I also gave a deadline within which the replies were to be returned to me. I completed my report on more than 120 children removed from their homes on unsatisfactory medical evidence of serious sexual abuse within 11 months of starting to hear evidence.
 
I assume the evidence in the Chilcot inquiry is enormous and the task of writing the report a daunting one, but I fail to……………….’
 
Continues behind paywall.
 
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/politics/article4530319.ece

Doug D

Posts : 2147
Reputation : 639
Join date : 2013-12-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

chilcot inquiry

Post by willowthewisp on 18.08.15 9:10

Hi DougD,
Thanks for the article on Chilcot debacle.
The next time the MSM are enthroned around teflon Tony about the next Labour party leader, they would best served asking teflon Tony, as to the delay in the report and what he would like redacted from within it's contents, this would put the report down to one page,"Chilcot Official report"?

willowthewisp

Posts : 1357
Reputation : 514
Join date : 2015-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Blair is worth 60 million

Post by tigger on 18.08.15 9:37

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/tony-blair/11670425/Revealed-Tony-Blair-worth-a-staggering-60m.html


Tony Blair and his family have quite an extensive property portfolio Photo: Adam Dean/Bloomberg

By Luke Heighton

5:30PM BST 12 Jun 2015

Tony Blair’s fortune now stands at some £60 million – three times the amount he has previously claimed, detailed analysis by the Telegraph has found.

Despite receiving tens of millions of pounds in fees from private clients around the world, his financial affairs can appear as complex and opaque as his global influence is remarkable.

• In pictures: Tony Blair's £25m property empire

The former prime minister, his wife Cherie and older children Euan, Nicky and Kathryn, now control a property empire covering some 10 homes across England and worth in excess of £25 million.

____________________
Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'entrate.

tigger

Posts : 8112
Reputation : 24
Join date : 2011-07-20

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Blair worth £60 Million

Post by willowthewisp on 18.08.15 10:03

Wonder if Teflon Tony wrote in to "Jim'll fix it"?
I wonder if he is happy and content, as it seems not judging by his mannerism over the Labour party leader debacle, they just want to keep the masses down trodden and in their place, cannon fodder?
Now that he has joined the upper Echelons of society, No he was born with a "Silver spoon in his mouth", take a look at his cronies, Lords Falconer, Mandelson, Goldsmith?
Remember the "Scars down my back quotes" he soon ditched the Clause 4 from the Labour party, stating they could not be elected to government with clause 4 in statue, Labour through and through, I doubt it, only looking after number one!!

willowthewisp

Posts : 1357
Reputation : 514
Join date : 2015-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Doug D on 19.08.15 13:58

Set a date to publish your report, Chilcot's right-hand man urges his boss
 
•   Senior figure working on Chilcot Inquiry backed calls for ‘definite timetable’
•   Sir Lawrence Freedman said he shared 'frustrations' of families of soldiers
•   Admitted he wouldn't have taken job if he had known how long it would be
•    
By LARISA BROWN and INDERDEEP BAINS and EMINE SINMAZ FOR THE DAILY MAIL
 
PUBLISHED: 00:33, 19 August 2015 | UPDATED: 07:28, 19 August 2015
 
One of the most senior figures in the Chilcot Inquiry last night backed calls for a ‘definite timetable’ on publishing the long-overdue report into the Iraq War.
 
Sir Lawrence Freedman, one of three panelists working alongside Sir John Chilcot, also admitted that he would never have accepted the job if he had known how long it would take.
 
The history professor said he shared the ‘frustrations’ of the families of British soldiers who died in the conflict, who say they have been left in a ‘terrible limbo’ as they wait for Sir John to publish the report.
 
Last week, 29 grieving families launched unprecedented legal action in a bid to force publication by December. But despite growing anger at the delays, the chairman and his entire panel failed to turn up at the inquiry’s Westminster office yesterday.
 
The Daily Mail tracked down all three panellists to their respective London homes, where they were spotted relaxing in casual clothing.
 
Sir Lawrence, 66, said he had just returned from a family holiday and would only be in the office two days this week.
 
His colleague, Sir Roderic Lyne, 67, was spotted sauntering towards his million-pound Richmond home yesterday afternoon wearing sports gear and trainers.
 
Final panellist Baroness Prashar, 67, returned home just after lunchtime wearing jeans and open-toed wedges. Neighbours near her semi-detached home in Worcester Park, south-west London, said they did not believe she had been to work.
 
Sir Lawrence dismissed claims that Sir John is on holiday and said he was still working – but the chairman was not seen entering the office yesterday.
 
The examination of the reasons why Britain took part in the disastrous 2003 invasion of Iraq has so far cost the taxpayer £10million and lasted more than six years. Sir John is paid £790 per day for his work on the inquiry and the rest of the panellists are paid £565 for each day they work.
 
Last night Reg Keys, whose son Lance Corporal Thomas Keys was killed by an Iraqi mob in 2003, said the fact the panel were not in the office was an ‘insult’.
 
‘When those British troops and my son went into Iraq they weren’t working part-time,’ he said. ‘They gave their lives to a full-time commitment, the inquiry should do likewise. Given the public outcry, they should have been there at 9am on the doorstep this morning.’
 
Rose Gentle, whose 19-year-old son Gordon was killed in Iraq in 2004, said: ‘You’d think the pressure they have been put under would inspire them to turn up to work.’
 
Last week Julian Lewis, Tory chairman of the Commons Defence Select Committee, said ‘anyone with a conscience’ would have ensured the report was published quickly for the sake of the relatives.
 
The delays have been blamed on the controversial process of ‘Maxwellisation’, in which those who are criticised in the report are notified and allowed to respond before publication.
 
Sir John has not been seen since the Mail revealed how families had given him a two-week ultimatum to set a date for releasing the report, or they will fight him in the courts.
 
Speaking at his Wimbledon home, Sir Lawrence said: ‘I’m a panelist, it’s not a full-time job and it doesn’t have full-time pay. While I was away the work of the inquiry continued ... We carry on throughout the summer and hold weekly meetings. ‘I’m going into the office on Wednesday and Thursday.’
 
When asked about the lengthy delays he admitted they were ‘frustrating’. ‘It is not because people are not working hard,’ he said. ‘It’s just the process is very long and complicated.’
 
He admitted a ‘definite timetable was needed’ for publication. Asked if he knew the inquiry would end up taking so long, he said: ‘No of course I didn’t, I wouldn’t have got involved if I did.’
 
Sir Roderic declined to comment yesterday and no one answered the door of Baroness Prashar’s home.
 
An inquiry spokesman said a timetable for publication would be provided once the Maxwellisation process is complete.
 
They added: ‘Sir John and his colleagues have worked, and will continue to work, throughout the summer, supported by the Inquiry Secretariat.’
 
 
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3202907/Set-date-publish-report-professor-Chilcot-panel-tells-boss-Senior-figure-says-shares-frustrations-families-never-accepted-job-known-long-inquiry-take.html

Doug D

Posts : 2147
Reputation : 639
Join date : 2013-12-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Chilcot inquiry

Post by willowthewisp on 20.08.15 11:13

Hi Dougd, thanks for the link to the Daily mail article.
So the three main protagonists are still receiving over £2,000 per day as a way of remuneration and they may have been caught off guard in the expose of their invovlement over the Chilcot Inquiry, using the Tax payer as a cash cow for themselves in the process?
Scurrying around London like scared rats looking for the rat run back to home, whilst supposedly working on the Inquiry, working under cover?

willowthewisp

Posts : 1357
Reputation : 514
Join date : 2015-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Concerned ex pat on 29.08.15 11:33

Have a read of "Beware of Chilcot" Craig Murray. A concise comment on the Chilcot committee members.

Concerned ex pat
Guest


Back to top Go down

Chilcot inquiry

Post by willowthewisp on 12.09.15 13:25

Well Done Jeremy Corbyn, what a great speech.
I do not think we will see the report quite soon as when you are on such a retainer as the inquiry panel the minutiae must be done accordingly?
Chilcot report to be published with the SP documentary 2016+?
I don't suppose Tony and Gordon sent a congratulations to Jeremy Eh?

willowthewisp

Posts : 1357
Reputation : 514
Join date : 2015-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Doug D on 09.11.15 9:51

Cameron said he is ‘disappointed’ there would be another eight or nine month delay:

Falklands hero Simon Weston says Iraq Inquiry delays an "insult to every person that died"


            12:32, 8 NOV 2015
            UPDATED 12:33, 8 NOV 2015
            BY JASON BEATTIE
 
Simon Weston says Iraq Inquiry chief Sir John Chilcot should be "ashamed" of report delay
 
Falklands veteran Simon Weston has blasted the delays to the Iraq War inquiry as “an insult to every single person that died.”

Mr Weston said the inquiry chief Sir John Chilcot should be “ashamed” at the length of time it has taken to produce his report.

Sir John announced last month that the £11million inquiry would report by June or July next year - seven years after he started and 13 years after Tony Blair ordered the invasion.

Mr Weston, who suffered 46% burns when his ship Sir Galahad was attacked in the 1982 Falklands conflict, told the BBC: “It is an insult to the memories of every single person that died, every single family that suffered because of injury and because of death of their loved ones over there.”

He added: “Whether Mr Chilcot can look at himself in the mirror in the morning and not feel ashamed, I don’t know, but I think he should.”
 
The war hero also said the inquiry had been “one of the worst episodes of political interference for any inquiry.”

His comments follow claims that officials and politicians delayed releasing documents, including those between Mr Blair and President George W Bush, that would shed light on the 2003 military invasion.

Families of those who died in Iraq recently accused Sir John of “twisting the knife” by delaying publication until next summer.
 
Reg Keys, father of one of the 179 British military personnel killed in the war, said: “It’s twisting the knife...ridiculous, it is not good enough.”

His son, Lance Corporal Thomas Keys, died aged 20 in a 2003 ambush.

Mr Keys added: “We’ve waited so long for this. We need answers, we need to move this black cloud of Iraq that has hung since 2003 when Tom was killed.”

Rose Gentle, who lost her Royal Highland Fusilier son Gordon, 19, in a 2004 Basra bomb attack, said: “They have everything they need. It’s another let-down. Another few months to wait and suffer.”

Sir John told the Prime Minister on October 29 he “estimated” the text of the report will be completed in the week beginning 16 April next year.

Its two million-plus words will then have to be checked to ensure they do not compromise national security when they are published.

That will take a while - because it is four times longer than War and Peace and ten times longer than Crime and Punishment.
 
Mr Cameron has said he was “disappointed” there would be another eight or nine month delay, while Jeremy Corbyn said the time taken was “getting beyond ridiculous.”

Sir John’s letter said: “The Inquiry will obviously seek to ensure no such [national security] breach might occur, but I entirely understand that a checking process is necessary and is normal procedure in inquiries which have considered a large volume of sensitive material, as we have.

“The very considerable size of our report - more than two million words in total - means that it will take some weeks to prepare the report for printing and publication.”
 
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/falklands-hero-simon-weston-says-6792059

Doug D

Posts : 2147
Reputation : 639
Join date : 2013-12-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by aiyoyo on 09.11.15 20:26

Waste of taxpayer money.  Nothing will come out of this.

Look at Hack Inquiry...even bleedy Murdoch got off scot free....and Rebecca Brook is back in business.

aiyoyo

Posts : 9611
Reputation : 318
Join date : 2009-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Doug D on 03.07.16 3:44

Chilcot Report due out on Wednesday.
 
Urgent need for ‘them’ to get Corbyn out before then, or is there?
 
Cue the spinners/strategists.
 
Is it better to have Corbyn still in place so they can try to spin any criticism of Blair into pacifism/sour grapes or get him out of the way first?
 
Is there anyone in HoC likely to go out on a limb and try and defend the indefensible or is it going to be an all out ‘reaching for the jugular’, with plenty of distancing, ‘I didn’t know’, ‘Nothing to do with me guv’.
 
Chilcot Inquiry: MPs seek to impeach Tony Blair using ancient law
 
Move could be made because of Labour leader’s alleged misleading of Parliament over Iraq War
 
Peter Yeung 9 hours  ago
 
A number of MPs are seeking to impeach former prime minister Tony Blair using an ancient Parliamentary law.
 
The move, which has cross-party support, could be launched in the aftermath of the Chilcot Inquiry report because of the Labour leader’s alleged role in misleading Parliament over the Iraq War.
 
MPs believe Mr Blair, who was in office between 1997 and 2007, should be prosecuted for breaching his constitutional duties and taking the country into a conflict that resulted in the deaths of 179 British troops.
 
Not used since 1806, when Tory minister Lord Melville was charged for misappropriating official funds, the law is seen in Westminster as an alternative form of punishment if, as believed, Mr Blair will escape serious criticism in the Chilcot Inquiry report.
 
Triggering the process simply requires an MP to propose a motion, and support evidence as part of a document called the Article of Impeachment.
 
If the impeachment attempt is approved by MPs, the defendant is delivered to Black Rod ahead of a trial.
 
A simple majority is required to convict, at which point a sentence can be passed, which could, in theory, involve Mr Blair being sent to prison.
 
Last year, current Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the former prime minister could be made to stand trial for war crimes, saying that he thought the Iraq War was an illegal one and that Mr Blair "has to explain that".
 
He added: “We went into a war that was catastrophic, that was illegal, that cost us a lot of money, that lost a lot of lives.
 
“The consequences are still played out with migrant deaths in the Mediterranean, refugees all over the region.”
 
It is believed the 2.6 million-word report, due to be published in July, will not make “any judgements on the legality [of the Iraq War]or anything like that, that is not the purpose”.
 
Chilcot will instead focus on the decision making behind the conflict and whether any lessons can be learned. Launched by the US with strong UK backing, the war lead to the deaths of between 150,000 and 600,000 Iraqis over four years.
 
Earlier this year, Alex Salmond, the former leader of the Scottish National Party, said the report will show that Mr Blair committed to the invasion of Iraq in private with President George Bush before 2003.
 
He said: “If, as I believe... Chilcot finds that there was a prior commitment from Blair to Bush at Crawford ranch [Bush’s Texas home] in 2002, that would provide the reason for pursuing the matter further.”
 
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/tony-blair-chilcot-inquiry-iraq-war-report-impeach-law-a7115266.html

.............................

No-one has yet managed to carry out a public 'citizens arrest' of Blair for war crimes in spite of the reward offered for doing so, due mainly to the diligent work of his minders, I believe.

Doug D

Posts : 2147
Reputation : 639
Join date : 2013-12-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by plebgate on 03.07.16 8:25

Can't wait to see what happens although I suspect Teflon Tone will bounce back.  His cronies will make sure of that - establishment to the core - CHAMPAGNE SOCIALIST OF THE HIGHEST ORDER.

____________________
Judge Judy to shifty  witnesses   -    LOOK AT ME  -   Um is not an answer.

If I forget to add it to a post everything is In My Opinion and I don't know anything for sure.
Rolling Eyes

plebgate

Posts : 5445
Reputation : 1160
Join date : 2013-02-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re; Chilcot Inquiry

Post by willowthewisp on 03.07.16 10:50

Hi DougD, one of the "Minders" is he related to Kate and Gerry,"I could be so good for you"

willowthewisp

Posts : 1357
Reputation : 514
Join date : 2015-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Tony Bennett on 03.07.16 13:33

OBTAINING A PECUNIRY ADVANTAGE BY DECEPTION

[ Section 16(2) Theft Act, 1968 ] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obtaining_pecuniary_advantage_by_deception


This might be stretching the strict meaning of the criminal law more than a tad, but according to this man:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JR9AGdKOLb4

...Tony Blair gained a pecuniary advantage (to wit, £6 million via J P Morgan)...

...by the deception of lying about Saddam Hussein having 'weapons of mass destruction.

Maybe somebody should bring a private prosecution against him, on this or some other ground

____________________

                            "Maddie's Jammies. Where is Maddie?" - Amelie, May 2007 -  "Maddie's Jammies. Where is Maddie?"


Tony Bennett
Researcher/Moderator

Posts : 13972
Reputation : 2147
Join date : 2009-11-25
Age : 69
Location : Harlow, Essex

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by joyce1938 on 03.07.16 14:44

I have read an article where it stated that it will not be covering mr tony Blair actions about the war at all ,its about other things like can prossicute some actions of soldiers etc. what astate of affairs, why did it take so many years then ? what the hell else was there to look at ?sickening ,is the word we mostly will feel .joyce1938

joyce1938

Posts : 805
Reputation : 86
Join date : 2010-04-20
Age : 77
Location : england

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by aquila on 06.07.16 11:00

Sky News live Chilcot Inquiry begins 11am GMT


http://news.sky.com/story/1722268/live-updates-pistorius-sentenced-for-murder

(the link shows pistorius - it's still the same live update for Chilcot)

aquila

Posts : 7953
Reputation : 1174
Join date : 2011-09-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by plebgate on 06.07.16 11:23

I was watching earlier on before the report was officially released and I think the only way the soldiers' families might get justice is through the courts.

Too many people already making excuses and putting it (trying to at least) on the security services.

Looks like Teflon Tone deserves his name imo.

Farce - thus far at least.

____________________
Judge Judy to shifty  witnesses   -    LOOK AT ME  -   Um is not an answer.

If I forget to add it to a post everything is In My Opinion and I don't know anything for sure.
Rolling Eyes

plebgate

Posts : 5445
Reputation : 1160
Join date : 2013-02-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Equity on 06.07.16 12:10

Seven years and £11 million pounds to state the bleeeding obvious?

Little in his report that hasn't been known and discussed for years.

Lawyers may try to use it to obtain compensation for bereaved relatives of soldiers (whilst lining their own pockets) but unless the Chilcot enquiry contains an unredacted 'Smoking Gun' document it will make it no easier to launch a private prosecution against Blair than it would have been years ago.

Hell will freeze over before Blair apologises or accepts he was wrong in anyway shape or form.
.

Equity

Posts : 51
Reputation : 95
Join date : 2016-05-24

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Doug D on 06.07.16 13:00

For those who haven’t got the time to read 2.5m odd pages, Robert Peston’s briefer commentary:
 
Robert Peston
1 hr ·
Facebook Mentions
·
There may be some who will deride the Chilcot report as a whitewash, because it does not contain tabloid-style indictments of Tony Blair or Jack Straw.
 
But in its very British, factual, understated way, its 2.6m words are a devastating critique of Blair and his government - of a failed and unnecessary war that cost countless and mostly civilian Iraqi lives, sent British soldiers to their deaths, destroyed any hope of stability in Iraq and made Britain more vulnerable to terrorism.
 
At a time when our national self-confidence is being sorely tested by the realisation we are a long way from having a detailed plan for how to thrive outside the EU, Chilcot is another shattering blow to our international reputation and our pride
.
How to put this into context?
 
Well 60 years ago the Suez crisis engendered a deep sense of national shame, that scarred us and conditioned our politics for many years.
Our Iraq adventure, combined with our failure to prepare in detail for Brexit, may be as bad for us or worse.
 
Later today, Jeremy Corbyn will apologise for the misguided actions of a Labour government in taking the UK to war in March 2003. Tony Blair will again refuse to concede he made a terrible mistake.
 
In the circumstances of Labour's deep division between its leader Corbyn allied with its members on the one hand and Labour MPs on the other, Chilcot may in fact be the hammer that destroys the party in any recognisable form.
 
If you are feeling strong enough, let's go through Chilcot's critique that we were wrong to go to war when we did, and we were appallingly negligent in our failure to prepare for the aftermath of conflict.
 
Here are the main findings:
1) when we went to war in March 2003, "there was no imminent threat from Saddam Hussein;
 
2) "the strategy of containment could have been adapted and continued for some time";
 
3) the UK military role in Iraq "ended a very long way from success";
 
4) "the circumstances in which it was decided that there was a legal basis for UK military action were far from satisfactory";
 
5) by going to war the UK was "undermining the [UN] Security Council's authority", in that most members of the council were rightly unconvinced that peaceful options to disarm Iraq had been exhausted;
 
6) there was a grotesque and systematic absence of proper cabinet oversight of almost all the important Iraq decisions, with far too much power residing in Blair;
 
7) policy on Iraq was made on the basis of "flawed intelligence and assessments", which should have been challenged, such as that Iraq possessed significant stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction, the means to deliver them and the capability for further build up;
 
8) Blair was correctly warned "that military action [in Iraq] would increase the threat from Al Qaida to the UK and to UK interests" - which was at odds with his statement to MPs that the threat from Saddam's arsenal posed a clear danger to British citizens;
 
9) Blair's view that we had to stand shoulder to shoulder with the US is derided by Chilcot, who points out that the decision of France and Germany to oppose the war has not done significant damage to their respective relationships with the US;
 
10) cabinet "did not discuss the military options or their implications";
 
11) Chilcot disagrees with Blair that "the difficulties encountered in Iraq after the invasion could not have been known in advance" - and says that "the risks of internal strife in Iraq, active Iranian pursuit of its interests, regional instability and Al Qaida activity in Iraq were each explicitly identified before the invasion";
 
12) "ministers were aware of the inadequacy of US plans" to deliver stability in post-invasion Iraq;
 
13) Blair "did not establish clear ministerial oversight of UK planning and preparation" and "did not ensure that there was a flexible, realistic and fully resourced plan that integrated UK military and civilian contributions, and addressed the known risks";
 
14) the British government's preparations "failed to take account of the magnitude of the task of stabilising, administering and reconstructing Iraq, and of the responsibilities which were likely to fall to the UK";
 
15) "the scale of the UK effort in post-conflict Iraq never matched the scale of the challenge" and "Whitehall departments and their ministers failed to put collective weight behind the task";
 
16) the ministry of defence was "slow in responding to the threat from Improvised Explosive Devices" and "delays in providing adequate medium weight patrol vehicles should not have been tolerated";
 
17) UK defence resources were chronically overstretched by their deployment in both Afghanistan and Iraq;
 
18) it was "humiliating that the UK" made a bargain with Basra militias to end the targeting of our forces for the exchange of detainees.
 
The lessons of the tragic Iraq intervention are legion. Some have already been learned. Others the government will learn.
 
But for most readers of Chilcot there are two overwhelming emotions: national regret and national shame.

Doug D

Posts : 2147
Reputation : 639
Join date : 2013-12-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Verdi on 06.07.16 13:01

@Equity wrote:Seven years and £11 million pounds to state the bleeeding obvious?

What could be worse - oh yes I know, Operation Grange, nine years and 12 million + to state the bleeding obvious.

____________________
The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made" - Groucho Marx

Verdi

Posts : 3550
Reputation : 2065
Join date : 2015-02-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by aquila on 06.07.16 13:05

Peston the Pundit speaks.

aquila

Posts : 7953
Reputation : 1174
Join date : 2011-09-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Verdi on 06.07.16 13:05

Chilcot 'does not say there was a deliberate attempt to mislead people' - PM


House of Commons

Parliament

Posted at 11:51

David Cameron says Sir John Chilcot's report does not give a view on the legality of the Iraq War, but "Sir John is highly critical of the processes" through which the then-government's legal advice was arrived at.

Mr Cameron says Tony Blair gave commitments to US President George that were not discussed openly in cabinet.

However, "at no stage does he explicitly say that there was a deliberate attempt to mislead people", the current PM adds

____________________
The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made" - Groucho Marx

Verdi

Posts : 3550
Reputation : 2065
Join date : 2015-02-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Verdi on 06.07.16 13:10

'I take full responsibility' - Tony Blair



Posted at 11:29


Tony Blair will set out a full response to the report later, but for now says that he acknowledged the Chilcot report made "real and material criticisms" of "preparation, planning, process and of the relationship with the United States".  
I will take full responsibility for any mistakes without exception or excuse. I will at the same time say why, nonetheless, I believe that it was better to remove Saddam Hussein and why I do not believe this is the cause of the terrorism we see today whether in the Middle East or elsewhere in the world.

Above all I will pay tribute to our armed forces. I will express my profound regret at the loss of life and the grief it has caused the families, and I will set out the lessons I believe future leaders can learn from my experience."

____________________
The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made" - Groucho Marx

Verdi

Posts : 3550
Reputation : 2065
Join date : 2015-02-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Chilcot Enquiry

Post by Verdi on 06.07.16 13:14

David Cameron addresses MPs on Chilcot report



House of Commons
Parliament
Posted at 11:42

David Cameron, whose statement will be followed by Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, says he hopes relatives who lost loved ones in Iraq can find "some comfort from knowing we will never forget the incredible sacrifice".

They "gave everything for their country", the PM adds.

Mr Cameron argues that the report would have been ready sooner if an inquiry had begun when MPs, including him, first called for it in 2006

Hissyfit  - What time does Corbyn take the stage?

____________________
The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made" - Groucho Marx

Verdi

Posts : 3550
Reputation : 2065
Join date : 2015-02-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Page 1 of 3 1, 2, 3  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum